Subscription Services: Subscribe | Change | Unsubscribe | RSS
Advertising Media Kit: Introduction | Rates | Testimonial | Contact
Miscellaneous: Reference Desk | Sitemap

Scientists Complete First Broad-Scale Maps Of Life On The Australian Sea-Shelf; 'We Identified 37 Environmental Factors'

print this print      Bookmark and Share   RSS 2.0 feed

HOBART, Tasmania -- Marine scientists from five research agencies have pooled their skills and resources to compile a directory of life on Australia's continental shelf.

They examined the shelf seascape during a three-year program of the Commonwealth Environment Research Facilities (CERF) Marine Biodiversity Hub.

Hub director, Professor Nic Bax of CSIRO and the University of Tasmania, says the program developed and applied a consistent, national approach to biodiversity mapping.

"The program compiled existing biological survey datasets, mapped 1868 square kilometers of seabed with multibeam sonar, recorded 171 km of underwater video, and collected nearly 1000 samples of seabed sediments and marine life," Professor Bax said.

"At a national level we identified 37 environmental factors that shape seabed life, such as depth, oceanography, the type of seafloor, food availability, and the strength of currents and waves.

"Statistical modeling was then used to predict seabed biodiversity, at a scale of one km2, across more than two million km2 of the continental shelf.

"Genetic techniques examined the links between biodiversity in different areas, and economic studies examined new options for biodiversity management."

Professor Bax said the new maps and knowledge highlight the complex patterns of biodiversity across Australia's shelf habitats, while emphasizing how much more we need to know.

Some of the maps have already been used by the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (SEWPaC) to improve its understanding of Australia's oceans as part of the marine bioregional planning process.

All of the new information will be incorporated into the Australia Ocean Data Network and the Atlas of Living Australia to improve access to essential information on Australia's biodiversity.

The program also completed finer scale mapping of previously unknown areas of the seabed in four important areas around Australia: Jervis Bay, Lord Howe Island, Southern-eastern Tasmania and Carnarvon Shelf.

"These studies have helped local marine managers to fine-tune reserve design, and will assist in monitoring individual marine reserves," Professor Bax said.

The Marine Biodiversity Research Hub brought together the University of Tasmania, CSIRO, Geoscience Australia, the Australian Institute of Marine Science and Museum Victoria under the Commonwealth Environment Research Facilities program. The CERF program is administered by SEWPaC.

The final report of the CEF Marine Biodiversity Hub is available at: www.marinehub.org.

Views expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect those of UnderwaterTimes.com, its staff or its advertisers.


bottom_left
bottom_right
Privacy Policy     © Copyright 2019 UnderwaterTimes.com. All rights reserved