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Research: Sea Coral's Trick Helps Scientists Tag Cells, Follow Individual Proteins within Cells
Chevy Chase, Maryland - Mar 19, 2006 19:53 EST

The glow emitted by a variety of sea coral helped Russian scientists harness the protein that generates the light to create a tiny fluorescent tag that responds to visible light. The two-color tag should help researchers follow individual proteins as...
 
Seoul Museum Buys Shark in Formaldehyde for $4m; 'The Wrath of God'
Seoul, South Korea - Mar 19, 2006 19:29 EST

The Samsung Museum in Seoul has bought Damien Hirst’s The Wrath of God (2005), a new version of the artist’s shark suspended in formaldehyde, for $4m from the Galeria Hilario Galguera in Mexico City. The Korean corporate museum has also...
 
Shark Attacks Surfer off Fiji Islands; 'The Shark Kept Circling the Area'
Sigatoka, Fiji - Mar 19, 2006 19:23 EST

Quick thinking by several surfers and intervention by a foreign nurse saved the life of a national surfing representative after a shark attacked him on Saturday evening. Paul Chong Sue of Kulukulu in Sigatoka was out training with friends close to...
 
Report: Filipino Fishermen Having a Blast, Scaring Whales, Destroying Coral
Babuyan Islands, The Philippines - Mar 19, 2006 19:04 EST

Fishermen in the once tranquil Babuyan Islands in Cagayan province are literally having a blast. Local fishermen, citing poor catch in recent months, have resorted to dynamite blasting to salvage metal from shipwrecks surrounding the islands, according to the World Wildlife...
 
New Zealand Takes Action to Ban Global Fish Subsidies
Geneva, Switzerland - Mar 19, 2006 19:01 EST

New Zealand has unveiled proposed new international trade rules to stop governments paying massive subsidies to fishermen to exploit the world’s already over fished oceans. “The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation has stated that 75 per cent of world fisheries...
 
Scientists: Radar Altimetry Revolutionizing the Study of the Ocean
Cambridge, Massachusetts - Mar 15, 2006 18:20 EST

Imagine a space tool so revolutionary it can determine the impact of climate change, monitor the melting of glaciers, discover invisible waves, predict the strength of hurricanes, conserve fish stocks and measure river and lake levels worldwide, among other scientific...
 
Indonesian Navy Seizes Ship Containing Artifacts Looted from Ancient Shipwrecks
Jakarta, Indonesia - Mar 13, 2006 19:59 EST

The Navy says it seized a ship loaded with pottery artifacts in waters near the Thousand Islands on Saturday. This follows last week's seizure of four ships loaded with similar artifacts in the South China Sea and the arrest of two...
 
Geologist: 'Mini tsunami' likely along Thai coast in the next 50 years
Bangkok, Thailand - Mar 13, 2006 19:46 EST

Geologists have forecast that Thailand's Andaman coast could face a "mini tsunami" in the next 50 years, and warned that the area's "improper" land use could put local residences in real danger if a worse-case scenario occurs. The magnitude of the...
 
DAN Fires Back at Chamber Operator, Denies Any Suspicious Activity with Insurance Subsidiary
Durham, North Carolina - Mar 13, 2006 19:05 EST

In a news release dated March 13, 2006, Divers Alert Network (DAN) US has responded to the recent news that numerous hyperbaric chambers operated by the SSS Network will no longer honor the insurance offered by DAN America. Chambers...
 
Aussie Scientists Discover Underwater Ant; 'We Were Sort of Dumbfounded'
Townsville, Australia - Mar 12, 2006 21:31 EST

Australian scientists have discovered what they think is the only species of ant that can live under water. Researchers at Townsville's James Cook University said Sunday that the newly discovered species - polyrhachis sokolova - nest in submerged mangroves and hide...
 
DAN Responds to Chamber Lockout, Vows to Fully Reimburse for Any Diving Accident Expenses
Durham, North Carolina - Mar 10, 2006 18:43 EST

In a statement dated March 10, Divers Alert Network (DAN) has responed to a notice from numerous chamber operators that they will no longer accept DAN insurance. Here is the text of DAN's statement: We can assure you that DAN members will...
 
DAN America Insurance Dumped at 10 Popular Dive Destinations; Cozumel, Belize, Bahamas, Galapagos...
Durham, North Carolina - Mar 9, 2006 19:33 EST

In a news release dated March 9, 2006, hyperbaric chamber operators from some of the world's most popular dive destinations have announced they will no longer accept DAN America insurance. The destinations include The Bahamas, Baja California, Belize, Cancun,...
 
Researchers: Bering Sea ecosystem changing 'from arctic to sub-arctic'
Arlington, Virginia - Mar 9, 2006 18:50 EST

Physical changes--including rising air and seawater temperatures and decreasing seasonal ice cover--appear to be the cause of a series of biological changes in the northern Bering Sea ecosystem that could have long-range and irreversible effects on the animals that live...
 
Scientists: Salmon Can Churn Entire Riverbeds from End to End; 'Little Rototillers'
Seattle, Washington - Mar 9, 2006 18:11 EST

Like an armada of small rototillers, female salmon can industriously churn up entire stream beds from end to end, sometimes more than once, using just their tails. For decades ecologists have believed that salmon nest-digging triggered only local effects. But a...
 
Research: Scattered Stones Makes Hatchery-Reared Fish Brains Grow Larger
Davis, California - Mar 8, 2006 19:34 EST

Hatchery-reared steelhead trout show increased growth of some parts of the brain when small stones are scattered on the bottom of their tank, according to a new study by researchers at UC Davis. The brains of those young fish were...
 
Winners from the Divephotoguide.com & Wetpixel.com International Photo Contest Released
The Meadowlands, New Jersey - Mar 8, 2006 08:55 EST

Wetpixel.com and DivePhotoGuide.com teamed up to celebrate the beauty and delicacy of the marine environment by developing the first instance of a new, annual, international underwater photography competition. For our inaugural event, only digital entries were accepted (images taken from...
 
Scientist warns of threat to last stronghold of endangered turtle
Exeter, UK - Mar 7, 2006 19:37 EST

A major conservation effort, led by Dr Brendan Godley of the University of Exeter, has just got underway to help protect endangered leatherback turtles which nest in Gabon, West Africa. The region is thought to be the animals' last global...
 
Researchers find ways heat-loving ocean microbes create energy; clues to the origin of life
St. Louis, Missouri - Mar 6, 2006 17:38 EST

Curiosity about the microbial world drove Jan Amend, Ph.D., associate professor of earth and planetary sciences in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, to Vulcano Island, Italy, a shallow hydrothermal Shangri-la near Sicily. There, Amend and his collaborators...
 
$500 for Fins: Tiger Shark Pregnant with 40 Young Snared, Slaughtered by Fisherman off Brunei
Jerudong, Brunei - Mar 3, 2006 18:39 EST

It was the catch of the day for two Indonesian fishermen, Muji and Kastan, when they hauled back a 500-kilogramme pregnant Tiger Shark to Jerudong shore from Champion 7. The large and ferocious warm-water shark with stripped body measured at 14...
 
Report: Pesticides Rampant in U.S. Streams, Ground Water; Concentrations Likely Not Harmful to Humans
Washington, D.C. - Mar 3, 2006 17:23 EST

The U.S. Geological Survey has just released a report saying pesticides linked to cancer, birth defects and neurological disorders contaminate almost all of the nation's rivers and streams and most fish found in them, but seldom at concentrations likely to...
 
New Shark Species Discovered in the Sea of Cortez; 'Mustelus hacat'
Mexico City, Mexico - Mar 2, 2006 19:26 EST

A Mexican marine biologist has discovered a new shark species in the murky depths of Mexico‘s Sea of Cortez, the first new shark find in the wildlife-rich inlet in 34 years. Postgraduate student Juan Carlos Perez was on a fishing boat...
 
Scientists: Tahiti coral fossils yield 'treasure trove' of climate records
Aix-en-Provence, France - Mar 2, 2006 19:03 EST

An international team of scientists, supported by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, reunited at the University of Bremen to analyze a trove of coral fossil samples retrieved from Tahitian waters during October and November 2005. Two weeks ago, led by...
 
The Big Deep: Behind the Scenes of the World's Deepest Wreck Dive
Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt - Mar 2, 2006 09:47 EST

I checked in at Gatwick Airport on Saturday, the third of December, with three very large dive bags containing all the necessary equipment to make a descent, hopefully, to the deepest wreck ever dived. Astraeus flights and Red Sea.com were more...
 
US Military Developing Remote-Control 'Spy' Shark with Neural Brain Implant
Hawaii - Mar 1, 2006 18:16 EST

Imagine getting inside the mind of a shark: swimming silently through the ocean, sensing faint electrical fields, homing in on the trace of a scent, and navigating through the featureless depths for hour after hour. We may soon be able to...
 
Scientists Confirm Massive Flood Triggered by Climate Change 8,200 Years Ago
New York, New York - Feb 28, 2006 18:12 EST

Scientists from NASA and Columbia University, New York, have used computer modeling to successfully reproduce an abrupt climate change that took place 8,200 years ago. At that time, the beginning of the current warm period, climate changes were caused by...
 
New Ocean Bottom Seismometer May Help Scientists Understand Seafloor Earthquake Mechanics
Falmouth, Massachusetts - Feb 28, 2006 08:35 EST

Hundreds of earthquakes occur every day around the world, most of them underneath the oceans, while the vast majority of instruments used to record earthquakes are on land. As a result, advances in understanding basic earthquake processes have been limited...
 
Man Loses Wedding Ring, Arm to Crocodile; 'They Never Brush Their Teeth'
Limpopo Province, South Africa - Feb 27, 2006 19:56 EST

Pieter Abrahamse has an original excuse for a lost wedding ring: a crocodile ate it, along with the arm it was attached to. "He took my wedding ring, I suppose he ate it up," Abrahamse told Reuters by telephone from his...
 
Researcher: Mangroves More Important to Oceans Than Previously Thought; 'Unexpected Role in the Global Carbon Cycle'
Washington, D.C. - Feb 27, 2006 19:52 EST

Mangroves, the backbone of the tropical ocean coastlines, are far more important to the global ocean's biosphere than previously thought. And while the foul-smelling muddy forests may not have the scientific allure of tropical reefs or rain forests, a team...
 
Beluga Whale 'Aliya' Learns to Blow Bubble Rings at Japanese Aquarium
Hamada City, Japan - Feb 26, 2006 19:19 EST

A Beluga whale at an aquarium in Japan has been wowing spectators with her new trick, blowing bubbles. The whale, named Allya by the Russian researcher who captured her, has been charming the crowds by aiming the bubbles at spectators as...
 
Biologist's Device Teases Out Individual Sounds from Underwater Racket
Seattle, Washington - Feb 24, 2006 18:36 EST

While biologists sort out what levels of noise go unnoticed, are annoying or cause harm to marine mammals, physical oceanographer Jeff Nystuen is giving scientists and managers a way to sift through and identify the sounds present in various marine...
 
Brother, Sister Plan Record Swim Across Malaysian Strait, 'God Willing'
Lumut, Malaysia - Feb 24, 2006 18:00 EST

Nine-year-old Salman Ali Shariati Abdul Halim and his sister, Zahra Ma'soumah, 13, are confident of establishing a record by swimming a distance of 8.9 kilometres from Pangkor Island to Lumut in about four hours on Sunday. The siblings said they did...
 
Expert: Disentangling Whales Perilous; 'Interpreting What a Whale Does is Difficult'
Cape Town, South Africa - Feb 23, 2006 19:15 EST

Whales may be intelligent, but they’re not human – so don’t expect them to behave in a human-like way when they’re entangled in ropes, lobster pots or buoys, says a visiting expert. Whale entanglement authority Bob Bowman, who works for the...
 
Scientists: Benefits of Seafood Outweigh Contamination Risks; '4-7 Times a Week'
Corvallis, Oregon - Feb 23, 2006 17:54 EST

Though some species of fish around the world's are likely to be contaminated with mercury, PCBs and other toxins, the benefits of eating seafood continue to outweigh the risks, a panel of scientists recently said at the annual meeting of...
 
Florida Scientists to Track Grouper Using Acoustic Beacons
Miami, Florida - Feb 22, 2006 20:25 EST

Florida researchers will embark on state-of-the-art research at the end of February to track black and red grouper in the Dry Tortugas National Park to develop a better understanding of species’ movement and habitat require-ments, so they can help more...
 
Scientists: Unlovable jawless lamprey holds clues to skeletal evolution
Gainesville, Florida - Feb 22, 2006 19:40 EST

It turns out lampreys, long thought to have taken a different evolutionary road than almost all other backboned animals, may not be so different after all, especially in terms of the genetics that govern their skeletal development, according to findings...
 
Midnight in the Marianas: Ancient Mystery Surrounding the Spawing Site of Japanese Eels Solved
Tokyo, Japan - Feb 22, 2006 18:55 EST

An ancient mystery surrounding the Japanese eel, a species as prized by fishermen for its high price as it is by chefs for its delicate flesh, has been explained at last. Like its Atlantic cousins, the Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) matures...
 
Changes in reef latitude; Is pollution causing regional coral extinctions?
Ft. Pierce, Florida - Feb 22, 2006 18:35 EST

Since the 1980s, researchers have hypothesized that nutrient levels rather than temperature are the main factor controlling the latitudinal bounds of coral reefs, but the issue remains controversial. New results from an extensive survey of reefs in South Florida by...
 
New Coral Reef Discovered off Thai Coast; 'The Reef Needs Special Protection'
Bangkok, Thailand - Feb 22, 2006 18:29 EST

A new coral reef discovered in Phang Nga’s Tai Muang area covers some four square kilometres and accounts for about 5 per cent of all the coral areas in the Andaman Sea. Lying around five kilometres offshore are more than 30...
 
Report: 70% of the Oceans Shark Free; All Populations 'Within the Reach of Human Fisheries'
Aberdeen, Scotland - Feb 22, 2006 18:22 EST

Marine scientists have discovered that the deepest oceans of the world would appear to be shark free. In a paper published today, an international team of researchers, led by the University of Aberdeen, reveal that sharks have failed to colonise at...
 
Researchers Use Beached Beaked Whale to Test Hearing and Sonar Sensitivity
Tampa, Florida - Feb 21, 2006 18:03 EST

Two scientists, Mandy L.H. Cook and David Mann, from the University of South Florida College of Marine Science, and colleagues at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution, have investigated the issue of whether sonar can be correlated with the stranding of beaked...
 



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