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Study: Some Undersea Worms Like It Really, Really Hot
Cambridge, Massachusetts - Apr 13, 2006 18:09 EST

Scientists have found that worms dwelling at deep-sea hydrothermal vents opt for temperatures of 45-55 degrees Celsius (113-131 degrees Fahrenheit) when given a choice of conditions, giving them the highest thermal preference of any animal studied to date. This unique...
 
Scientists: Harmless River Bacteria Creates World's Strongest Superglue
Bloomington, Indiana - Apr 12, 2006 18:33 EST

The glue one species of water-loving bacteria uses to grip its surroundings may be the strongest natural adhesive known to science. If engineers can find a way to mass-produce the material, it could have uses in medicine, marine technology and...
 
Researchers trawl the origins of sea fishing in Northern Europe
York, United Kingdom - Apr 12, 2006 18:09 EST

For decades the study of fish bones was considered one of the most esoteric branches of archaeology, but now it is helping to reveal the massive significance of the fishing trade in the Middle Ages. New research co-ordinated by archaeologists at...
 
Technology that measures sea level, helps predict EL Nino events, improved by new modeling
Durham, New Hampshire - Apr 11, 2006 18:50 EST

A paper published today in the American Geophysical Union's Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans shows a method to recover valuable data from the primary tool used for measuring global sea level -- satellite radar altimetry. Altimeter data are used, among other...
 
Group: Kiwi Sea Lion 'Kill Quota' Increase Unjustified
Wellington, New Zealand - Apr 11, 2006 18:28 EST

The 55% mid-season increase in the number of NZ sea lions that the squid fishing industry will be allowed to kill this season is unjustified, Forest & Bird said today. "There is no new scientific evidence to justify the Minister's 55%...
 
Group: Farm Subsidy Reform Key to Restoring Gulf of Mexico "Dead Zone"; Programs Said to Subsidize Pollution
Washington, D.C. - Apr 11, 2006 17:17 EST

Each year, an average of $270 million worth of wasted fertilizer flows down the Mississippi River into the Gulf of Mexico, creating a "Dead Zone" of more than 5,000 square miles that is completely devoid of marine life. Now, a...
 
Study: Shellfish Back on the “Good” List; Actually Low in Cholesterol, High in Omega-3's
- Apr 11, 2006 17:10 EST

If you enjoy shellfish but are reluctant to eat it because of worries about cholesterol, take heart. Blue mussels, broiled scallops or a fine Maine lobster are actually heart-healthy protein sources. Most shellfish are not only low in cholesterol, but...
 
Divers find gold near sunken treasure ship off Florida Keys
Key West, Florida - Apr 11, 2006 12:25 EST

Divers have found two gold bars and 15 silver coins, which had been buried beneath the ocean floor off this island city for almost 400 years. The objects are believed to be from the shipwreck of the Nuestra Senora de Atocha,...
 
Endangered Species in a Can? 'Lions and Tigers of the Sea' Being Fed to Children
Forest Knolls, California - Apr 10, 2006 18:10 EST

It's common knowledge that we are running out of oil. What's not so well known is that we are also running out of big fish, argues Robert Ovetz. The harsh realization that catches of big fish—marlin, sharks, swordfish and tuna—are declining...
 
Scientists: Carp Found to Hold Its Breath for Months
Oslo, Sweden - Apr 7, 2006 17:51 EST

How long can you hold your breath? Scientists at the University of Oslo have recently discovered how the Crucian Carp, a close relative of the goldfish, is able to live for months without oxygen. The researchers hope that understanding how...
 
Researchers: Contaminants May Play Role in Apparent Decline of White Sturgeon in Columbia River
Corvallis, Oregon - Apr 6, 2006 21:35 EST

White sturgeon populations in the Columbia River may be declining due to the presence of elevated amounts of foreign chemicals including DDT and polychlorinated biphenyls in their bodies, according to new studies by researchers at Oregon State University. The research by...
 
Study: Albatrosses Show Regional Differences in Ocean Contamination; 'These Contaminants have Long-term Effects'
Santa Cruz, California - Apr 6, 2006 21:19 EST

As long-lived predators at the top of the marine food chain, albatrosses accumulate toxic contaminants such as PCBs, DDT, and mercury in their bodies. A new study has found dramatic differences in contaminant levels between two closely related albatross species...
 
Malaysia Bans Flippers in Marine Parks
Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia - Apr 5, 2006 22:34 EST

The use of flippers by snorkellers is to be banned at all marine parks in Malaysia. Resort operators have been given one week to notify their guests of the directive. The move follows a recommendation from the Fisheries Department that the use...
 
Scientists: Anti-freeze Gene in Fish Evolved from 'Junk' DNA
Springfield, Illinois - Apr 4, 2006 19:33 EST

Scientists at the University of Illinois have discovered an antifreeze-protein gene in cod that has evolved from non-coding or 'junk' DNA. Since the creation of these antifreeze proteins is directly driven by polar glaciation, by studying their evolutionary history the...
 
Research: Salmon OK After Going Veggie; Canola Oil Viable Alternative for Feed
Lancaster, U.K. - Apr 4, 2006 19:07 EST

Salmon, like humans, require omega-3 fatty acids in their diet to function healthily. But as the fish farming industry expands, feeding salmon and other aquatic species with pellets containing fishmeal and oil derived from processing wild-caught marine fish is unsustainable...
 
Study: Alaska seal pup diet may hold key to decline of population
Fairbanks, Alaska - Apr 4, 2006 17:32 EST

Female harbor seal pups whose blubber falls below average levels may be at higher risk of delayed sexual maturation or death, even if they get enough fat in their diets later on, according to a new study sponsored by The...
 
Scientist: Jesus Walked on a Isolated Patch of Floating Ice; 'Springs Ice'
Tallahassee, Florida - Apr 4, 2006 17:26 EST

The New Testament story describes Jesus walking on water in the Sea of Galilee but according to a study led by Florida State University Professor of Oceanography Doron Nof, it's more likely that he walked on an isolated patch of...
 
Scientists: Some Cod Like It Hot, Some Not
Canterbury, U.K. - Apr 3, 2006 19:36 EST

Scientists at CEFAS (UK) have found that the migration pattern of wild cod is much less restricted by environmental temperature than laboratory studies suggest. Previously, research in the lab indicated that the preferred temperature range of cod was between 11-15ÂșC....
 
Researcher: Fish larvae don't swim well because they lack control
Lancaster, U.K. - Apr 3, 2006 18:57 EST

Do you remember learning to swim? Thrashing around, floundering, until suddenly it all clicks into place and a few feeble strokes of doggy-paddle propel you away from your parent's arms. Surely, you think, fish must be born as expert swimmers....
 
Sierra Leone Angler Catches 'Man Eating' Shark Responsible for Four Fisherman's Deaths
Freetown, Sierra Leone - Mar 29, 2006 18:05 EST

An amateur angler in Sierra Leone has caught a 300 kg (660 lb) shark that local fishermen say killed four of their colleagues at sea off the impoverished West African country. Riad Hassan, a 61-year-old jeweller, said he caught the shark...
 
Scientists: Lack of Oxygen in Ocean 'Dead Zones' Trigger Sex Changes in Fish, Posing Extinction Threat
Washington, D.C. - Mar 29, 2006 14:33 EST

Oxygen depletion in the world’s oceans, primarily caused by agricultural run-off and pollution, could spark the development of far more male fish than female, thereby threatening some species with extinction, according to a study published today on the Web site...
 
French Diver Condems Indonesia Over Detention in Archeological Salvage Operation; 'Incomprehensible and Scandalous'
Jakarta, Indonesia - Mar 28, 2006 20:03 EST

A French professional diver on Monday condemned Indonesian authorities for detaining him over allegedly taking part in what they say was an illegal archeological salvage operation. "It is incomprehensible and scandalous. It concerns disrespect of freedom and of human rights," Jean-Paul...
 
Study: Ultrasound, Algae Team Up to Clean Up Mercury from Contaminated Sediment
Columbus, Ohio - Mar 28, 2006 18:59 EST

Ultrasound and algae can be used together as tools to clean mercury from contaminated sediment, according to an Ohio State University study. This research could one day lead to a ship-borne device that cleans toxic metals from waterways without harming fish...
 
Republic of Kiribati Creates World's Third Largest Marine Reserve; 'A Major Milestone'
Curitiba, Brazil - Mar 28, 2006 17:47 EST

A small Pacific Islands nation has distinguished itself on the global conservation map with the declaration today that it is creating the third largest marine protected area in the world, conserving an archipelago of some of the planet's most pristine...
 
Report: Environmentalists' 'marine reserve' proposals for North Sea misguided
Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom - Mar 27, 2006 19:14 EST

Proposals by environmentalists to declare small areas of the North Sea as 'no-fishing' zones would not save our flagging fish stocks, suggests a new report by Newcastle University for the British Government's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. (DEFRA). Marine...
 
Satellite making first direct measurements of ocean surface velocities
Bergen, Norway - Mar 27, 2006 18:50 EST

For more than a decade space-based radar instruments have been routinely observing ocean surface phenomena including wind, waves, oil slicks, even the eyes of hurricanes. Now – employing the same principle as police speed guns – satellite radar has also...
 
Researcher: Seagrass in decline worldwide; human activity is to blame
Durham, North Carolina - Mar 27, 2006 18:45 EST

Around the world, seagrass beds – shallow-water ecosystems that are important habitats, food sources, and sediment stabilizers – are in decline, says Frederick Short, research professor of natural resources and marine science at the University of New Hampshire. And as...
 
Scientists discover interplay between genes and viruses in tiny ocean plankton
Cambridge, Massachusetts - Mar 25, 2006 11:26 EST

New evidence from open-sea experiments shows there's a constant shuffling of genetic material going on among the ocean's tiny plankton. It happens via ocean-dwelling viruses, scientists report this week in the journal Science. Conducted by biological oceanographers Sallie Chisholm and her...
 
Study: Ocean virus identified in human blood samples; effects unclear
Eugene, Oregon - Mar 23, 2006 18:30 EST

A virus of ocean origin that can cause a range of diseases in several animal species has been found in human blood samples. The virus, or antibodies to it, was found most often in the blood of individuals with liver...
 
Lebanese Diver 'Threatened with Death' for Calling Out Dynamite Fishermen; 'The Situation is Worsening'
Sidon, Lebanon - Mar 23, 2006 18:19 EST

Replying to the fishermen's denial that they were using dynamite to fish, Lebanese Professional Divers' Association president Mohammad Sareji said he was "threatened with death" by one of the fishermen because he called for putting an end for this method. In...
 
Tests: Red Tide Caused Sea Turtle Die-off in El Salvador
San Salvador, El Salvador - Mar 23, 2006 18:12 EST

A “Red Tide” event that occurred off the coast of El Salvador late last year directly caused the deaths of some 200 sea turtles, according to test results released today by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and other organizations. Responding to...
 
Research: Polar Melting May Raise Sea Level Sooner than Expected; 20 Feet by 2100
Tucson, Arizona - Mar 23, 2006 17:47 EST

The Earth's warming temperatures are on track to melt the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets sooner than previously thought and ultimately lead to a global sea level rise of at least 20 feet, according to new research. If the current warming...
 
Study: Deep-sea Fish Populations Boom Over the Last 15 Years
San Diego, California - Mar 23, 2006 17:42 EST

The largest habitats on Earth are located in the vast, dark plains at the bottom of the ocean. Yet because of their remoteness, many aspects of this mostly unexplored world remain mysterious. New research led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at...
 
Scientists: 'Supramolecules' Could Cleanup Mercury in Latin America's Rivers
Surrey, United Kingdom - Mar 22, 2006 19:16 EST

Mercury pollution is poisoning many Latin American rivers. The Argentinean, Brazilian, Peruvian, British, Swedish and Spanish researchers working on the Mercury project are now tackling this specific problem with the aid of some remarkable supramolecules. "Latin America could experience a disaster...
 
British Invester Wants to Build Giant Aquarium in Bali
Denpansar, Bali - Mar 22, 2006 19:07 EST

British investor Newman Bio Marine Pte Ltd wanted to build a giant aquarium in popular tourist resort in Sanur area on Bali Island, a British businesswoman said. The company wished to make a large aquarium in Sanur since the area`s underwater...
 
Four Scuba Divers Adrift Over 48 Hours in the Philippines after Boat Breaks Down; SOS Ignored
Panglao, The Philippines - Mar 22, 2006 19:02 EST

Four scuba divers, three of which are foreigners, including three pumboat crew were rescued after the pumpboat they were riding developed engine trouble mid-sea between Bohol and Camiguin islands. Elmer Loreno, boat captain, from Sunrise, Tawala, Panglao told the Chronicle during...
 
13-year old Deaf and Dumb Boy Becomes India's Youngest Scuba Diver
Port Blair, India - Mar 22, 2006 18:46 EST

A 13-year old deaf and dumb boy from Andaman and Nicobar islands has become India's youngest scuba diver. Gaurav Baidya became the youngest scuba diver when he received the Pacific Area Diving Institute (PADI) certificate, the international scuba body certificate, after...
 
Researchers: Warbling Whales Speak a Language All Their Own; 'Elements of Language' in Songs
Cambridge, Massachusetts - Mar 21, 2006 19:34 EST

The songs of the humpback whale are among the most complex in the animal kingdom. Researchers have now mathematically confirmed that whales have their own syntax that uses sound units to build phrases that can be combined to form songs...
 
Fiji Surfer Says Shark Bite Won't Deter Career; 'I'm Sure This Would Make Him Stronger'
Sigatoka, Fiji - Mar 20, 2006 18:25 EST

A surfer who was bitten by a shark on Sunday is not going to give up on his surfing career when he recovers. Paul Chong Sue, 21, of Kulukulu in Sigatoka was saved by his friends who distracted the shark when...
 
Scientists use satellites to detect deep-ocean whirlpools
Newark, Delaware - Mar 20, 2006 17:58 EST

Move over, Superman, with your X-ray vision. Marine scientists have now figured out a way to "see through" the ocean's surface and detect what's below, with the help of satellites in space. Using sensor data from several U.S. and European satellites,...
 



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