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Malaysian Minister Threatens to Close Sipadan to Diving in Response to 'Exaggerated' Damage Claims
Koto Kinabalu, Malaysia - May 18, 2006 22:11 EST

Deputy Chief Minister of Sabah Tan Sri Chong Kah Kiat Thursday said that he was seriously considering closing Sipadan Island if people were so concerned about the environmental damage to the island and its surrounding areas of late. It was reported...
 
Report: Barge That Destroyed Sipadan Coral Part of New Scuba Tourism Project; National Icon 'Damaged'
Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia - May 18, 2006 20:59 EST

The giant barge that apparently beached and scraped off pristine corals at Sipadan's famous Dropoff Point was bringing in materials and heavy equipment to build a RM5 million tourism facility comprising a restaurant-cum-clubhouse, scuba shop, office and staff quarters, sources...
 
A Story in Pictures: The Sinking of the Mighty Oriskany Off Pensacola Florida
Pensacola, Florida - May 18, 2006 20:44 EST

The ex-Oriskany, a decommissioned aircraft carrier, became the largest ship intentionally sunk as an artificial reef May 17 when it was sunk approximately 24 miles off the coast of Pensacola, Fla. After 25 years of service to the Navy in operations...
 
Kenyan Officials Recover Stolen 'Koranic' Tuna from Unscrupulous Traders
Mombasa, Kenya - May 18, 2006 20:31 EST

National Museums of Kenya (NMK) officials have recovered the rare fish with Arabic inscriptions after it was stolen by people posing as officials from the department. The fish, caught off the Vanga coast in Kwale District last week, was recovered from...
 
Study: Governments Have Failed to Stop Overfishing; Quotas, Scientific Advice Ignored
Gland, Switzerland - May 18, 2006 20:02 EST

Around the world, governments are failing to prevent over-fishing on the high seas. Many are ignoring scientific advice and increasing catches rather than enforcing wise management, reveals a new report from WWF and TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring network. Regional Fisheries...
 
Drug Discovery Team to Explore Newly Discovered Deep-Sea Reefs
Fort Pierce, Florida - May 17, 2006 22:17 EST

Last December, University of Miami researchers using advanced sonar techniques discovered new deepwater reef sites 2,000 to 2,900 feet deep in the Straits of Florida between Miami and Bimini. From May 22-30, Harbor Branch scientists will work with Miami colleagues...
 
Report: Sipadan Marine Paradise Destroyed by Grounded Construction Barge
Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia - May 17, 2006 21:58 EST

A giant barge has apparently flattened corals at Sipadan's legendary Dropoff Point inflicting "incalculable" damage, according to a report containing pictures of what are believed to be the damaged section posted on the Internet by Fins Magazine Associate editors Andrea...
 
Study: Coral reef reveals history of fickle weather in the central Pacific
Chicago, Illinois - May 16, 2006 23:02 EST

Close examination of coral reef reveals that when the rest of the world was experiencing warm weather, the Pacific was cold. And during a period of cold weather elsewhere in the world, the Pacific was warm and stormy For more than...
 
Study: Exxon Valdez oil found in tidal feeding grounds of ducks, sea otters
Prince William Sound, Alaska - May 16, 2006 22:45 EST

Seventeen years after the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Alaska’s Prince William Sound, compelling new evidence suggests that remnants of the worst oil spill in U.S. history extend farther into tidal waters than previously thought, increasing the probability that the...
 
Small Whale Stoned to Death in Manila Harbor After Being Mistaken for a Shark
Manila, The Philippines - May 16, 2006 21:55 EST

A small whale stranded Tuesday in the polluted shallow waters of Manila Bay died after seaside residents, who mistook it for a shark, pelted the marine mammal with rocks. Local residents in a fishing "Floating Village" in suburban Paranaque City said...
 
Report: Salton Sea May Become Environmental Hazard without Restoration
Oakland, California - May 16, 2006 21:49 EST

The Salton Sea is shrinking, and without a restoration project it will transform from California's largest lake into an economic, health, and environmental hazard. The Sea's 75-year crash-course is detailed in a report released today by the Oakland-based Pacific Institute,...
 
President Bush Urged to Create World's Largest Marine Sanctuary; 'Marine Equivalent of Yellowstone National Park'
Washington, D.C. - May 15, 2006 22:10 EST

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich in a letter to President Bush called attention to "a marvelous opportunity to leave a historic mark on U.S. and world conservation history." In the letter sent earlier this year, Gingrich urged the...
 
Study: Global Warming May Have Damaged Coral Reefs Forever
Newcastle upon Tyne, UK - May 15, 2006 21:53 EST

Global warming has had a more devastating effect on some of the world's finest coral reefs than previously assumed, suggests the first report to show the long-term impact of sea temperature rise on reef coral and fish communities. Large sections of...
 
Kenyan Authorities to Preserve Fish Carrying Koranic Message; 'God is Communicating with His People'
Mombasa, Kenya - May 14, 2006 18:41 EST

The Kenyan fisheries department has taken the fish with a Koranic message caught off the Mombasa coast on Friday for preservation at its Liwatoni cold house. At the same time, the National Museums of Kenya said it would document it for...
 
New 'Allah' Fish Discovered by Kenyan Fisherman; Tuna Inscribed with 'God is the Provider'
Mombasa, Kenya - May 13, 2006 17:01 EST

A fisherman off Kenya's south coast's Vanga area early yesterday morning caught a unique fish with patterns on one side that resembled Islamic calligraphic inscriptions. The two-kilo tuna species was discovered at a Mombasa Old Town fish outlet ‘Takaungu Fish Shop’...
 
Precision Biochemistry Tracks DNA Damage in Fish; 'Very Sensitive Biomarkers'
Seattle, Washington - May 12, 2006 16:43 EST

Like coal-mine canaries, fish DNA can serve as a measure of the biological impact of water and sediment pollution--or pollution clean-up. That's one of the conclusions of a new study by researchers from the Pacific Northwest Research Institute (PNRI), Woods...
 
750-lb Hammerhead Shark Caught Off Florida Coast May Be World Record
Fort Myers, Florida - May 12, 2006 16:18 EST

A potential world record hammerhead shark was caught on Wednesday in Boca Grande Pass. Capt. Andy Whitbread of Fort Myers captured a 13 foot, 4 inch, 750-pound hammerhead. Whitbread used an estimated 12- to 15-pound live crevalle jack as bait and...
 
Shark-Saving Magnets Pull in $25,000 Prize for American from International Smart Gear Competition
Washington, D.C. - May 11, 2006 21:43 EST

A New Jersey inventor today was awarded the grand prize in the International Smart Gear Competition for a fishing gear innovation that could save thousands of sharks a year from dying accidentally on fishing lines, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and...
 
Scientists Reveal Fate of Earth's Oceans; Seawater Absorbed Into the Deep Earth
Manchester, UK - May 10, 2006 21:14 EST

Scientists at The University of Manchester have uncovered the first evidence of seawater deep inside the Earth shedding new light on the fate of the planet's oceans, according to research published in Nature (May 11, 2006). For years geologists have debated...
 
Researchers: Nanosecond-scale release of stinging jellyfish nematocysts 'fastest cellular processes in nature'
Frankfurt, Germany - May 8, 2006 22:05 EST

By using an electronic ultra-high-speed camera, researchers have characterized the explosive discharge of stinging jellyfish nematocytes and show that this event represents one of the fastest cellular processes in nature. The research is reported by Thomas Holstein of the University...
 
Study: Caribbean Leatherback Sea Turtles Stage Comeback
St. Croix, Virgin Islands - May 8, 2006 21:39 EST

The first week in May marked the emergence of the first hatchlings from leatherback turtles nesting on Sandy Point, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. If this year follows recent trends, it will continue one of the most positive turns for...
 
Thai Fishermen Break Ranks, Vow to Resume Hunt of Endangered Mekong Catfish; 'We Need to Make A Living'
Chang Rai, Thailand - May 4, 2006 17:40 EST

Two fishermen who joined in a landmark promise to help preserve the endangered giant catfish in the Mekong river and not catch them any more have returned to the hunt. ''We need to make a living,'' said Ban Hat Krai...
 
Diverse Sea 'Bugs' Revealed on Landmark Atlantic Cruise to Census Zooplankton
Charleston, South Carolina - May 4, 2006 17:27 EST

Census of Marine Life scientists trawled rarely explored tropical ocean depths between the southeast US coast and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge to inventory and photograph the variety and abundance of zooplankton – small sea "bugs" that form a vital link in...
 
The Secret Life of the Not So Sluggish Sea Slug; 'Nature's Gift to Neurobiologists'
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - May 3, 2006 18:08 EST

It turns out that the sea slug isn't really that sluggish after all. So says the first broad field study of this charismatic orange creature's behavior in the wild, which was just published in the April 2006 issue of The...
 
Historic Schooner Shipwrecks Added to National Register of Historic Places
Scituate, Massachusetts - May 2, 2006 10:39 EST

The wrecks of the coal schooners Frank A. Palmer and Louise B. Crary, which rest on the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary seafloor, have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the nation's official list of cultural resources...
 
DAN America, Chamber Operator Reach Settlement; Insurance Again Accepted at All SSS Chambers
Durham, North Carolina - Apr 27, 2006 12:28 EST

In a news release dated April 26, 2006, Divers Alert Network (DAN America) and clinic members of the SSS Network of Recompression Chambers (SSS) announce that they have reached a settlement in the recent legal action over billing practices. Representatives of...
 
Research: Tiny Polyps Gorge Themselves to Survive Coral Bleaching
Columbus, Ohio - Apr 26, 2006 17:23 EST

Certain species of coral have surprised researchers by showing an unexpectedly successful approach towards survival when seriously bleached. Their innovative strategy is gluttony. The discovery, derived from experiments on coral reefs in Hawaii, provides new insights into how these tiny animals face...
 
Experts: 'No Fishing Zones', Marine Reserves Needed to Protect Gulf of Mexico Turtles
Houston, Texas - Apr 24, 2006 18:29 EST

The world’s top sea turtle experts are calling on both the United States and Mexico to provide more protection for the Kemp’s ridley sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico. A resolution passed in Crete earlier this month at the...
 
Research: Cuttlefish are Masters of Disguise Despite Colorblindness
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Apr 20, 2006 17:29 EST

Cuttlefish are wizards of camouflage. Adept at blending in with their surroundings, cuttlefish are known to have a diverse range of body patterns and can switch between them almost instantaneously. New research from MBL Marine Resources scientists, to appear in...
 
Geologists: Ancient Fish Teeth Provide Clues to Beginning of Antarctic Cooling
Gainsville, Florida - Apr 20, 2006 15:42 EST

Ancient fish teeth are yielding clues about when Antarctica became the icy continent it is today, highlighting how ocean currents affect climate change. University of Florida geologists have used a rare element found in tiny fish teeth gathered from miles below...
 
Plans to Drill Into Deep Antarctic Lakes Called into Question Over Contamination Fears
London, United Kingdom - Apr 19, 2006 15:02 EST

Plans to drill deep beneath the frozen wastes of the Antarctic, to investigate subglacial lakes where ancient life is thought to exist, may have to be reviewed following a discovery by a British team led by UCL (University College London)...
 
For some young fish, early gene expression is a clear harbinger of fated lifestyle
Bern, Switzerland - Apr 17, 2006 19:47 EST

Large swaths of the genome are controlled by the choice of a sedentary versus migratory future As juveniles, individuals of many fish species face a developmental choice that will profoundly affect their future: whether to adopt a sedentary or migratory lifestyle....
 
Colombian Biologist Claims World's Largest Shrimp: Almost 16 Inches
Cartagena, Colombia - Apr 17, 2006 19:28 EST

Colombian biologist Edilberto Flechas has bought what he claims to be the largest shrimp ever seen. He bought the massive shrimp from a fisherman for the equivalent of $800. "This is the biggest species ever known here or even in literature," said...
 
German, French Diver Accused of Looting Shipwreck In Indonesia Freed on Bond; '100% Innocent'
Jakarta, Indonesia - Apr 13, 2006 19:32 EST

Police have released German and French divers accused of looting Indonesian shipwreck after their employers promised to pay Rp 700 million (US$77,777.78) bond should they run away or destroy evidence. Lawyer of the two divers Yudhistira said that his clients were...
 
Scientists: Unprecedented Number of Walrus Calves Stranded by Melting Sea Ice
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Apr 13, 2006 18:19 EST

Scientists have reported an unprecedented number of unaccompanied and possibly abandoned walrus calves in the Arctic Ocean, where melting sea ice may be forcing mothers to abandon their pups as the mothers follow the rapidly retreating ice edge north. Nine lone...
 
Study: Some Undersea Worms Like It Really, Really Hot
Cambridge, Massachusetts - Apr 13, 2006 18:09 EST

Scientists have found that worms dwelling at deep-sea hydrothermal vents opt for temperatures of 45-55 degrees Celsius (113-131 degrees Fahrenheit) when given a choice of conditions, giving them the highest thermal preference of any animal studied to date. This unique...
 
Scientists: Harmless River Bacteria Creates World's Strongest Superglue
Bloomington, Indiana - Apr 12, 2006 18:33 EST

The glue one species of water-loving bacteria uses to grip its surroundings may be the strongest natural adhesive known to science. If engineers can find a way to mass-produce the material, it could have uses in medicine, marine technology and...
 
Researchers trawl the origins of sea fishing in Northern Europe
York, United Kingdom - Apr 12, 2006 18:09 EST

For decades the study of fish bones was considered one of the most esoteric branches of archaeology, but now it is helping to reveal the massive significance of the fishing trade in the Middle Ages. New research co-ordinated by archaeologists at...
 
Technology that measures sea level, helps predict EL Nino events, improved by new modeling
Durham, New Hampshire - Apr 11, 2006 18:50 EST

A paper published today in the American Geophysical Union's Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans shows a method to recover valuable data from the primary tool used for measuring global sea level -- satellite radar altimetry. Altimeter data are used, among other...
 
Group: Kiwi Sea Lion 'Kill Quota' Increase Unjustified
Wellington, New Zealand - Apr 11, 2006 18:28 EST

The 55% mid-season increase in the number of NZ sea lions that the squid fishing industry will be allowed to kill this season is unjustified, Forest & Bird said today. "There is no new scientific evidence to justify the Minister's 55%...
 



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