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Americas Newswire

Group: Half the World's Penguin Species Marching Towards Extinction; 'The Planet is in Denial'
Washington, D.C. - Nov 28, 2006 18:01 EST

The Center for Biological Diversity, (Center), a non-profit conservation organization, filed a formal petition today requesting that 12 species of penguins worldwide be added to the list of threatened and endangered species under the United States Endangered Species Act. Abnormally...
 
Scientists: Prehistoric Fish had Bite Stronger than a T-rex; 'Able to Devour Anything'
Chicago, Illinois - Nov 28, 2006 17:00 EST

It could bite a shark in two. It might have been the first “king of the beasts.” And it could teach scientists a lot about humans, because it is in the sister group of all jawed vertebrates. Dunkleosteus terrelli lived...
 
Europe's First Captive-born Beluga Dead at 25 Days; Rejected Whale 'Never Adapted to Artificial Milk'
Valencia, Spain - Nov 28, 2006 09:45 EST

A baby beluga whale born in a Spanish marine park--the first beluga whale born in captivity in Europe--has died at the age of 25 days. Officials at the Oceanographic park in Valencia said Tuesday that the whale had died the previous...
 
A Giant Among Minnows: Zebrafish Versus Giant Danio DNA Could Yield Abilities to Grow Muscle
Bethesda, Maryland - Nov 27, 2006 17:22 EST

Two fish that share much in common genetically appear to have markedly different abilities to grow, a finding that could provide a new way to research such disparate areas as muscle wasting disease and fish farming, a new study shows....
 
Scientists Lose Deep Sea Instruments, Gain First Look at Seafloor Formation
New York, New York - Nov 23, 2006 20:12 EST

Ordinarily, losing almost all of one's instruments would be considered a severe setback to any scientist. But when Maya Tolstoy, a marine geophysicist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, a member of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, recently learned that...
 
Research: Dramatic Shift from Simple to Complex Marine Ecosystems Occurred 250M Years Ago at Mass Extinction
Chicago, Illinois - Nov 23, 2006 20:06 EST

The earth experienced its biggest mass extinction about 250 million years ago, an event that wiped out an estimated 95% of marine species and 70% of land species. New research shows that this mass extinction did more than eliminate species:...
 
Autopsy: Coast Guard Divers Suffered 'Uncontrolled Descent' to 189 Feet and Suffocated
Seattle, Washington - Nov 22, 2006 20:21 EST

One of two Coast Guard divers who mysteriously perished during a training dive in the Arctic last summer plunged toward the ocean floor in an uncontrolled descent, suffocated and developed lung trauma during a rapid rise to the surface, according...
 
Scientists: Size and Shape of Corals Key Factor for Survival in Increasingly Angry Oceans; 'Colony Shape Factor'
Santa Barbara, California - Nov 22, 2006 19:19 EST

Size and shape may predict the survival of corals around the world when the weather churns the oceans in the years to come, according to a new model that relies on engineering principles. The increasing violence of storms associated with global...
 
Scientists Make, Mate Robot Tadpoles to Prove Propulsion Theory
Poughkeepsie, New York - Nov 21, 2006 19:34 EST

A team of scientists thinks our ancient predecessors developed vertebrae and a backbone to stiffen their bodies so they could swim more powerfully and has developed robot tadpoles to help prove the theory. The far-distant forebearers of humans and other vertebrates...
 
Report: Coast Guard Arctic Diver Died of Trauma to the Lungs; Rapid Ascent Suspected
Seattle, Washington - Nov 21, 2006 19:10 EST

One of the two Coast Guard divers who perished in the Arctic last summer died of trauma to the lungs — a condition caused by rapid ascent — and possibly had dived deeper than planned, her father said Tuesday. William...
 
No Valid Bids During eBay Auction for Key West Artificial Reef Naming Rights; 'None Were Serious'
Key West, Florida - Nov 21, 2006 16:29 EST

None of three bids posted on an eBay auction for naming rights to a proposed artificial reef project off Key West are valid, but the project will move ahead, organizers said Tuesday. The bids ranged from $900,000 to $900,200. "We checked the...
 
Researchers: Male Crayfish Seen Performing Elaborate 'Pseudocopulatory' Rituals of Dominance and Submission
Atlanta, Georgia - Nov 21, 2006 08:01 EST

Like dogs mounting one another or rolling onto their backs, US researchers say crayfish act out elaborate rituals of dominance and submission. They say it is the first time an invertebrate species had been seen to display such "humping" behaviour, common...
 
Study: Humpback Whales Capable of Emanating 622 Social Sounds; 'Wops' and 'Yaps'
Washington, D.C. - Nov 20, 2006 19:09 EST

A new study has revealed that humpback whales are capable of emanating as many as 622 social sounds. Scientists believe the whales' broad vocal repertoire enables them to communicate with their fellow whales, like summoning their young or even wooing...
 
Scientists Press Japan to Stop Dolphin Drive Slaughter; 'An Abominable Violation... of Animal Welfare'
Atlanta, Georgia - Nov 20, 2006 18:46 EST

With the annual dolphin drive hunts in full swing in the Japanese villages of Taiji and Futo, a consortium of scientists and zoo and aquarium professionals continues its public awareness campaign to end the practices and is now appealing to...
 
World Record Hammerhead Shark Goes on Display; 'Awe-Inspiring in Size'
Sarasota, Florida - Nov 17, 2006 18:10 EST

Mote Marine Laboratory has announced that a full-scale fiberglass model of the world record great hammerhead shark donated by a recreational fisherman in May of this year will be added to the shark exhibit area at Mote Aquarium. The...
 
Scientists: Mega-Tsunami Hit Earth 10,000 Years Ago; 'Chevrons are Everywhere, Everywhere'
Washington, D.C. - Nov 16, 2006 20:20 EST

Scientists from Australia, New Zealand and the United States have come up with evidence of massive objects having struck the Earth's oceans thousands of years ago, causing tsunamis that dwarf the ones experienced in recent times. There have been up...
 
Florida Fisherman Penalized for Shark Finning; $68,000 Fine, 100-day Permit Sanction
Miami, Florida - Nov 15, 2006 16:40 EST

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has issued a $68,000 civil penalty and a 100-day permit sanction to the owner and operator of the fishing vessel Sea Angel for multiple violations of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. According...
 
A New Target for Painkillers: Snail Toxins Show the Way; 'A New Way to Treat Chronic Pain'
Salt Lake City, Utah - Nov 13, 2006 19:59 EST

A brand new approach to treating severe nerve pain – by aiming drugs at a previously unrecognized molecular target – has been discovered by University of Utah scientists who study the venoms of deadly, sea-dwelling cone snails. “We found a...
 
Phosphorus Found to be Another Culprit in Gulf of Mexico's 'Dead Zone'; System 'Out of Balance'
New Brunswick, New Jersey - Nov 13, 2006 19:48 EST

Nitrogen is flowing down the Mississippi River and into the Gulf of Mexico faster than it can be consumed by floating microscopic plants called phytoplankton, increasing the size of the "dead zone" off the Louisiana coast. The findings, based on...
 
Scientist: Millions of 'Sea-Level Refugees' Could Flee Rising Oceans
Nairobi, Kenya - Nov 9, 2006 18:57 EST

Nations must make plans to help tens of millions of "sea level refugees" if climate change continues to ravage the world's oceans, German researchers said on Thursday. Waters are rising and warming, increasing the destructive power of storms, they said, and...
 
Philippines President Enacts New Conservation Policy to Protect Southeast Asia's 'Coral Triangle'
Batangas City, Philippines - Nov 9, 2006 18:18 EST

President Gloria Arroyo has enacted a new national conservation policy for the Philippines to protect the archipelagic country's unique and rich nature, with initial focus on the heart of Southeast Asia's Coral Triangle. "It is the policy of the state to...
 
Researchers Link Ocean Organisms with Increased Cloud Cover and Potential Climate Change
Atlanta, Georgia - Nov 7, 2006 17:20 EST

Atmospheric scientists have reported a new and potentially important mechanism by which chemical emissions from ocean phytoplankton may influence the formation of clouds that reflect sunlight away from our planet. Discovery of the new link between clouds and the biosphere...
 
Email Campaign Initiated Against China's 'Irresponsible' Alibaba.com Over Shark Fin Marketplace
Miami, Florida - Nov 6, 2006 18:04 EST

The Ocean Realm Society will join an email campaign opposing the business practice of the online trader Alibaba.com to allow the posting of shark parts for purchase and sale. According to the company web site, Alibaba.com Corporation is China's leading...
 
Straitjacket Can’t Hold Underwater Escape Artist, But the Police Will
Key West, Florida - Nov 4, 2006 10:13 EST

He escaped from a straitjacket, but not the long arm of the law. Michael Anthony Patrick, a 55-year-old street performer, was charged with negligence Wednesday after his act prompted a massive harbor search. Authorities said the longtime Key West performer regularly escapes...
 
Research: How Fish Mend a Broken Heart May Lead to Human Cures
Durham, North Carolina - Nov 2, 2006 21:03 EST

New evidence to explain how a common tropical fish mends a broken heart may suggest methods for coaxing the damaged hearts of mammals to better heal, researchers report in the November 3, 2006 issue of Cell, published by Cell Press. The...
 
Scientists: Managing Other Stressors Key to Saving Coral, Mangroves Threatened by Climate Change
Geneva, Switzerland - Nov 1, 2006 18:51 EST

Survival strategies for coral reefs and mangroves threatened by climate change are outlined by scientists of IUCN-World Conservation Union and the Nature Conservancy in two new publications launched today. The strategies rely on managing stressors other than global warming so...
 
New Species and New Records of Marine Species Discovered in NW Hawaiian Islands
Honolulu, Hawaii - Oct 31, 2006 19:40 EST

A three-week scientific expedition to French Frigate Shoals in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine National Monument returned to Honolulu on Sunday with the discovery of many new species and a better understanding of marine biodiversity in the Hawaiian Archipelago. An...
 
Galapagos Marine Patrols Gain Speed on Seafaring Outlaws; WWF Overhauls Boat to Protect Marine Life
Washington, D.C. - Oct 30, 2006 18:16 EST

A former U.S. Coast Guard cutter, overhauled and refitted by World Wildlife Fund, began patrolling the waters of the Galapagos today as the first National Park Service vessel fast enough to outrun and catch poachers at sea. With the arrival of...
 
Geologists: Ancient Lake Tahoe Tsunami Discovered; 'A Great Pile of Sediment Uplifted'
Sacramento, California - Oct 26, 2006 18:27 EST

A giant underwater landslide that gouged the bottom of Lake Tahoe thousands of years ago sent a tsunami coursing across the lake and left huge ripples of rock that remain today, geologists have discovered. Three scuba divers, a robot submarine...
 
NASA Looks at Sea Level Rise, Hurricane Risks for New York City
Greenbelt, Maryland - Oct 26, 2006 17:17 EST

New York City has been an area of concern during hurricane season for many years because of the large population and logistics. More than 8 million people live in the city, and it has hundreds of miles of coastline that...
 
California Angler Snags Record 13-foot, 1,175-pound Shortfin Mako Shark; 'Chewed the Motor'
Los Angeles, California - Oct 25, 2006 17:36 EST

When Chris Podesto hooked into a huge shortfin mako shark off Catalina Island he watched in awe as the powerful gamefish ran and jumped wildly like nothing he's ever seen in his life. The 13-foot mako was leaping 30 feet in...
 
Research: 'Living Fossil' Blood-Sucking Lamprey 'Parasitic for 360 Million Years'
Chicago, Illinois - Oct 25, 2006 17:18 EST

Scientists from the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, and the University of Chicago have uncovered a remarkably well-preserved fossil lamprey from the Devonian period that reveals today's lampreys as "living fossils" since they have remained largely unaltered for...
 
New 'Revolutionary' Underwater Breathing Device Revealed; 'The Greatest Thing In the Industry In a Long Time'
San Diego, California - Oct 24, 2006 18:04 EST

Homeland Security Group International, Inc. announced today that its newest product, Neptune EBD1, has been re-designed to extend the breathing time to fifty-five minutes. The new breathing device measures approximately 13 inches long, 4 1/2 inches wide with a weight...
 
U.S. Fishery Proposes Ban on Shark Feeding for Sight-Seeing, Not Shark Fishing, in Federal Waters
Honolulu, Hawaii - Oct 23, 2006 18:13 EST

Federal fishery managers have banned shark feeding for sight-seeing operations in federal waters, which are located beyond three miles from shore. The measure, voted on last Thursday, would not apply to fishermen who harvest sharks or other marine life, according to...
 
Research: Tiny 'Housekeeper' Crab Keeps Coral Healthy; 'We Do Know That They are 'Picky''
Santa Barbara, California - Oct 23, 2006 17:52 EST

The story of the relationship between the crab and the coral is described in the November 2006 issue of the journal Coral Reefs and is now available on-line. The coral provides a home and protection for the crabs. The crabs...
 
Research: Rising Seas, Silt Making Every U.S. Gulf Coast Bay Vulnerable to Significant Flooding
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - Oct 23, 2006 17:43 EST

New research finds that every U.S Gulf Coast bay in Texas and Louisiana is vulnerable to significant flooding and expansion within the coming century due to a combination of rising seas and reduced silt flowing from dammed up rivers. "Looking back...
 
Scientists Discover Bacteria That Use Radiated Water as Food; 'A Completely Different World'
Bloomington, Indiana - Oct 20, 2006 09:38 EST

Researchers from Indiana University Bloomington and eight collaborating institutions report in this week's Science a self-sustaining community of bacteria that live in rocks 2.8 kilometers below Earth's surface. Think that's weird? The bacteria rely on radioactive uranium to convert water...
 
Study: Beaked Whales Perform Extreme Dives to Hunt Prey; Decompression Mystery Lingers
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Oct 19, 2006 16:57 EST

A study of ten beaked whales of two poorly understood species shows their foraging dives are deeper and longer than those reported for any other air-breathing species. This extreme deep-diving behavior is of particular interest since beaked whales stranded during...
 
Big Food: Consumer Reports Should Withdraw Fish Advisory for Pregnant Women
Washington, D.C. - Oct 18, 2006 19:14 EST

In light of yesterday's thoughtful conclusions about seafood and health from the Institute of Medicine (IOM), the nonprofit Center for Consumer Freedom is urging the Consumers Union of the United States (publisher of Consumer Reports magazine) to withdraw its recommendation...
 
Researcher: Great White Sharks Travel Far; California to Hawaii and Back
Monterey, California - Oct 18, 2006 19:06 EST

A great white shark is back along the Central Coast after deep ocean travels as far as Hawaii. Sean Van Sommeran, executive director of the Pelagic Shark Research Foundation, said satellite tracking devices picked up the shark off Ano Nuevo Island...
 

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