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Europe Newswire

Research: Oil Spills Raise Arsenic Levels In The Ocean; 'Could Create A Toxic Ticking Time Bomb'
London, England - Jul 2, 2010 19:08 EST

Oil spills can increase levels of toxic arsenic in the ocean, creating an additional long-term threat to the marine ecosystem, according to research published today in the journal Water Research. Arsenic is a poisonous chemical element found in minerals and...
 
Electrolux Launches 'Vac From The Sea' Initiative To Turn Plastic Islands Into Vacuum Cleaners
Stockholm, Sweden - Jun 30, 2010 18:29 EST

The Pacific Ocean is polluted with the largest floating garbage islands in the world. Electrolux intends to gather plastic from the world's oceans and turn it into a number of vacuum cleaners. The initiative – "Vac from the Sea" –...
 
New Insights Into Volcanic Activity On The Ocean Floor; Broken Crust Does Not Always Produce Volcanic Eruptions
London, England - Jun 16, 2010 17:22 EST

New research reveals that when two parts of the Earth's crust break apart, this does not always cause massive volcanic eruptions. The study, published today in the journal Nature, explains why some parts of the world saw massive volcanic eruptions...
 
Study Begins On Air-Sea Exchanges And Their Influence On Climate; 'These Exchanges Are Not Well Understood'
Southampton, U.K. - May 28, 2010 17:56 EST

A two-year project, which will provide vital information on the interaction between the ocean and the atmosphere and its influence on climate, begins this month. Scientists at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC), University of Leeds, and the British Antarctic Survey...
 
European Space Agency: Satellite Images Provide Clear Evidence Gulf Oil Spill In The Loop Current
Strasbourg, France - May 19, 2010 21:26 EST

Scientists monitoring the US oil spill with ESA's Envisat radar satellite say that it has entered the Loop Current, a powerful conveyor belt that flows clockwise around the Gulf of Mexico towards Florida. "With these images from space, we have visible...
 
Scientific Team Makes First Detailed Underwater Survey Of Huge Volcanic Flank Collapse Deposits
Southampton, U.K. - May 5, 2010 22:10 EST

A scientific team led by Dr Peter Talling of the UK's National Oceanography Centre (NOC) is currently aboard the Royal Research Ship James Cook to map extremely large landslide deposits offshore from an active volcano on Montserrat in the Lesser...
 
British Scientific Expedition Discovers World'S Deepest Known Undersea Volcanic Vents; 'Awe-Inspiring'
Southampton, U.K. - Apr 12, 2010 20:35 EST

A British scientific expedition has discovered the world's deepest undersea volcanic vents, known as 'black smokers', 3.1 miles (5000 meters) deep in the Cayman Trough in the Caribbean. Using a deep-diving vehicle remotely controlled from the Royal Research Ship James...
 
Report: Mangrove Forests In Worldwide Decline, One In Six Face Extinction
Gland, Switzerland - Apr 9, 2010 18:36 EST

More than one in six mangrove species worldwide are in danger of extinction due to coastal development and other factors, including climate change, logging, and agriculture, according to the first-ever global assessment on the conservation status of mangroves for the...
 
Researchers: Medicine Residues May Threaten Fish Reproduction; 'We Are Finding These Levels In Treated Waste Water'
Gothenburg, Sweden - Apr 6, 2010 21:24 EST

Researchers at Umeå University and the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg have discovered that traces of many medicines can be found in fish that have been swimming in treated waste water. One such medicine, the hormone levonorgestrel, was...
 
Researchers Equip Robot Sub With Sensory System Inspired By Blind Fish; 'Snookie' Features Artificial Lateral-Line System
Munich, Germany - Mar 29, 2010 21:07 EST

Clever as a blind fish, the underwater robot "Snookie" can orient itself in murky waters with an artificial sensory organ inspired by the so-called lateral-line system, found in fish and some amphibians. The experimental vehicle was developed by researchers at...
 
Research: Human Introduction Of Non-Native Fish Increased The Average Body Size Of Fish, Altering Aquatic Ecosystems
Paris, France - Mar 27, 2010 18:01 EST

New research has shown that human introduction of fish into rivers over the past 150 years have modified the average body size of fish in many areas of the world. A study conducted by researchers from CNRS, the University of...
 
Atlantis? Oceanographers Find Signs Of Atlantic Disaster 2,000 Years Ago
Kiel, Germany - Mar 25, 2010 14:20 EST

Scientists said Thursday they have discovered evidence that a major natural disaster occurred in the Atlantic Ocean around 2,000 years ago - possibly triggering a monster tsunami. The edge of the African continental shelf broke off and scattered debris over 150,000...
 
Iceland Illegally Exporting Whale Meat To The European Union; 'Riding Roughshod Over International Law'
London, England - Mar 18, 2010 19:54 EST

Icelandic government records state that the country is exporting meat from slaughtered whales to Latvia and Denmark, as well as Japan - in defiance of international law and a global whaling ban. Data from Statistics Iceland, the source for official Icelandic...
 
Jaws B.C.: 4 Million-Year-Old Shark Attack Reconstructed; 'The Only Evidence To Go On Was The Bite Marks'
Pisa, Italy - Mar 17, 2010 19:00 EST

It might sound like a mashup of monster movies, but palaeontologists have discovered evidence of how an extinct shark attacked its prey, reconstructing a killing that took place 4 million years ago. Such fossil evidence of behavior is incredibly rare,...
 
Research: 'Opportunist' Sharks Eat Whatever Food Is Available In The Environment
Madrid, Spain - Mar 17, 2010 18:10 EST

A team of Spanish researchers has studied the diet of three species of sharks living in the deep waters in the area of El Cachucho, the first Protected Marine Area in Spain, which is located in the Cantabrian Sea off...
 
Study: Ocean Geoengineering Scheme No Easy Fix For Global Warming; 'There Remain Many Uncertainties'
Southampton, UK - Feb 20, 2010 18:36 EST

Pumping nutrient-rich water up from the deep ocean to boost algal growth in sunlit surface waters and draw carbon dioxide down from the atmosphere has been touted as a way of ameliorating global warming. However, a new study led by...
 
Researchers: Carbonate Veins Reveal Chemistry Of Ancient Seawater; 'A Major Challenge For Earth Scientists'
Southampton, UK - Feb 11, 2010 17:52 EST

The chemical composition of our oceans is not constant but has varied significantly over geological time. In a study published this week in Science, researchers describe a novel method for reconstructing past ocean chemistry using calcium carbonate veins that precipitate...
 
Research: Single-celled Creature Tackles The Challenge Of Homebuilding Beyond The Abyss
Southampto, UK - Feb 11, 2010 17:47 EST

Evidence from the Challenger Deep-– the deepest surveyed point in the world's oceans-– suggests that tiny single-celled creatures called foraminifera living at extreme depths of more than ten kilometres build their homes using material that sinks down from near the...
 
UN: Whales, Dolphins And Porpoises Suffer High Death Rate As By-catch In Fishing Nets
Bonn, Germany - Feb 4, 2010 16:36 EST

Toothed whales are currently suffering from a major threat which is unsustainable loss from by-catch in fishery operations. For 86% of all toothed whale species, entanglement and death in gillnets, traps, weirs, purse seines, longlines and trawls poses a major...
 
Research: 'Primordial Soup' Not The Origin Of Life; Hydrothermal Vents 'Kick-started Early Life'
Düsseldorf, Germany - Feb 3, 2010 16:37 EST

For 80 years it has been accepted that early life began in a 'primordial soup' of organic molecules before evolving out of the oceans millions of years later. Today the 'soup' theory has been over turned in a pioneering paper...
 
Research: Echinoderms Contribute To Global Carbon Sink; 'Understudied Compartment Of The Global Marine Carbon Cycle'
Southampton, U.K. - Jan 15, 2010 14:00 EST

The impact on levels of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere by the decaying remains of a group of marine creatures that includes starfish and sea urchin has been significantly underestimated, conclude scientists. "Climate models must take this carbon sink...
 
Killer Whale Drowns Trainer At Spanish Zoo During Practice For Christmas Show
Tenerife, Spain - Dec 24, 2009 17:43 EST

A trainer at Loro Parque, a zoo in the Canary Islans, was accidentally killed by an orca during a training session for a Christmas spectacular planned to open at the beginning of January. The trainer was identified as 29-year-old...
 
21st Century Explorers Return With Unique Data From Indian Ocean; Diversity Of Species 'Higher Than Expected'
Gland, Switzerland - Dec 19, 2009 11:11 EST

A team of the world’s leading marine experts, paired with scientists from the Indian Ocean region, have just returned from a six-week research expedition above seamounts in the high seas of the Indian Ocean with a whole new understanding of...
 
Study: Coral Reef Fish Can Undergo A Personality Change In Warmer Water; Increased Activity, Boldness And Aggressiveness
Sydney, Australia - Dec 5, 2009 17:05 EST

Coral reef fish can undergo a personality change in warmer water, according to an intriguing new study suggesting that climate change may make some species more aggressive. Experiments with two species of young damselfish on Australia's Great Barrier Reef have shown...
 
New Method Of Measuring Ocean CO2 Uptake Could Lead To Climate Change 'early Warning System'
East Anglia, Norwich - Dec 3, 2009 18:06 EST

An international team of scientists led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) has developed a new method of measuring the absorption of CO2 by the oceans and mapped for the first time CO2 uptake for the entire North Atlantic. Published...
 
Research: Climate Change Impact On Kuwait Bay Magnified; 'Global Trends May Not Be Representative Locally'
Southampton, U.K. - Nov 30, 2009 22:17 EST

Since 1985, seawater temperature in Kuwait Bay, northern Arabian Gulf, has increased on average 0.6°C per decade. This is about three times faster than the global average rate reported by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Differences are due...
 
New Japanese Prime Minister Urged To Recall Whaling Fleet, 'Chart A New Course For 21st Century'
London, England - Nov 19, 2009 14:29 EST

The International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) is urging Japan's new government to recall its whaling fleet which is heading to Antarctica to cruelly hunt almost 1,000 whales. In defiance of global pressure and a number of international laws, the...
 
Scientists Ponder: How Much Water Does The Ocean Have?
Potsdam, Germany - Nov 13, 2009 17:29 EST

The calculation of variations in the sea level is relatively simple. It is by far more complicated to then determine the change in the water mass. A team of geodesists and oceanographers from the University of Bonn, as well as...
 
Research: Guppy Females Take Risks To Avoid Harassment; 'Sex Matters'
Exeter, Devon - Nov 5, 2009 15:58 EST

As every pet owner knows, animals may show individual traits just like humans and be shy or social, aggressive or gentle. Boldness, or the propensity to take risks, is an important animal trait because it affects species' diversity. 'Bold individuals...
 
Scientists Map Nutrient Distributions Over The Atlantic Ocean; 'Of Major Interest To Oceanographers'
Southampton, UK - Nov 3, 2009 21:40 EST

Large-scale distributions of two important nutrient pools – dissolved organic nitrogen and dissolved organic phosphorus (DON and DOP) have been systematically mapped for the first time over the Atlantic Ocean in a study led by Dr Sinhue Torres-Valdes of the...
 
HyBIS AUV Explores The Casablanca Seamount; 'We Discovered A Very Rugged Terrain'
Southampton, UK - Oct 30, 2009 17:38 EST

In October, the hydraulic benthic interactive sampler HyBIS maintained by the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS) made ten dives over the Casablanca Seamount, a four-kilometre high seamount located some 300 miles west of Morocco. The deepest dive was onto the...
 
UK's Deepest Diving Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Ready For 'Hostile And Rugged Terrain'
Southampton, U.K. - Oct 28, 2009 21:13 EST

The United Kingdom’s deepest diving Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV), Autosub6000, has been put through its paces during an extremely successful engineering trials cruise on the RRS Discovery, 27 September to 17 October 2009. Autosub6000 was working in regions of the...
 
What Are Coral Reef Services Worth? Experts Say $130,000 To $1.2 Million Per Hectare, Per Year
Paris, France - Oct 16, 2009 18:18 EST

Experts concluding the global DIVERSITAS biodiversity conference today in Cape Town described preliminary research revealing jaw-dropping dollar values of the “ecosystem services” of biomes like forests and coral reefs – including food, pollution treatment and climate regulation. Undertaken to help...
 
German Photog Snaps Great White Shark Calendar; 'Hardly Anyone Is Interested In Protecting These Animals'
Illingen, Germany, - Oct 15, 2009 15:15 EST

Underwater photographer Klaus Jost has been pursuing his fascination with great whites, tiger sharks and bull sharks many for years and follows these impressive animals up close in their natural habitat. His incentive, however, is not just to share his...
 
Study: Rising Sea Levels Are Increasing The Risk Of Flooding Along The South Coast Of England
Southampton, U.K. - Oct 9, 2009 17:38 EST

A new study by researchers at the University of Southampton has found that sea levels have been rising across the south coast of England over the past century, substantially increasing the risk of flooding during storms. The team has conducted a...
 
Scientists: 'Man Made Pollution' Nourishing World's Oceans; 'a Previously Unknown Source Of Bioavailable Iron'
Leeds, U.K. - Oct 7, 2009 19:19 EST

Scientists at the University of Leeds have proved that acid in the atmosphere breaks down large particles of iron found in dust into small and extremely soluble iron nanoparticles, which are more readily used by plankton. This is an important finding...
 
Scientists: 'Man Made Pollution' Nourishing World's Oceans; 'a Previously Unknown Source Of Bioavailable Iron'
Leeds, U.K. - Oct 7, 2009 19:19 EST

Scientists at the University of Leeds have proved that acid in the atmosphere breaks down large particles of iron found in dust into small and extremely soluble iron nanoparticles, which are more readily used by plankton. This is an important finding...
 
Brit Scientists Track Green Turtle’s 900km Migration Through The Caribbean; 'A Great Educational Tool'
Exeter, UK - Oct 3, 2009 18:10 EST

University of Exeter scientists are part of the first team to monitor a sea turtle’s journey from the Turks and Caicos Islands. The adult female green turtle, named ‘Suzie’ by local fishermen, was fitted with a satellite transmitter tag. She has visited...
 
Unlocking The Secrets Of The 'Deep Biosphere': The Future Of Scientific Ocean Drilling Discussed At 'historic' Meeting
Bremen, Germany - Sep 29, 2009 22:04 EST

Close to 600 scientists from 21 countries met Sept. 23 – 25 2009 in Bremen, Germany, to outline major scientific targets for a new and ambitious ocean drilling research program. The scientific community envisions that this program will succeed the...
 
Research: Single Gene Makes Fish Less Colorful, Less Attractive To Members Of The Opposite Sex
London, England - Sep 28, 2009 21:57 EST

There may be plenty of fish in the sea but the medaka knows what it likes. A new study published in the open access journal BMC Biology shows how a single gene mutation that turns Japanese Killifish a drab grey...
 

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