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Predatory Snail Decimating Native Oysters In California Bay; 'Red Rock Crabs Are Holding The Line'
Tomales Bay, Florida - Aug 3, 2009 21:23 EST

Invasive species are enemy No. 1 to native Olympia oysters unlucky enough to find themselves in Tomales Bay, about 40 miles north of San Francisco, scientists say. Fully half the population of native oysters in the coastal estuary has fallen victim...
 
U.S. Navy Announces Undersea Warfare Training Range Off Florida Coast; 'Committed To Protecting The Ocean'
Washington, D.C. - Aug 3, 2009 21:09 EST

The Department of the Navy announced today that it will locate an undersea warfare training range (USWTR) in the Jacksonville, Fla. operating area. BJ Penn, assistant secretary of the Navy for installations and environment, signed the record of decision...
 
Sick Fish May Get Sicker: Climate Change And Other Stresses Expected To Affect Entire Populations Of Fish
Washington, D.C. - Aug 3, 2009 20:59 EST

Entire populations of North American fish already are being affected by several emerging diseases, a problem that threatens to increase in the future with climate change and other stresses on aquatic ecosystems, according to a noted U.S. Geological Survey...
 
Famed Chef Alice Waters Swears Off Shark Fins; Other Chefs Encouraged To Do The Same
Washington, D.C. - Jul 31, 2009 18:39 EST

Alice Waters, the renowned chef, restaurateur and author, has signed Humane Society International's No Shark Fin pledge, committing never to consume or serve shark fin soup or any product containing shark fin. Ms. Waters is the founder of Chez Panisse...
 
Research: Iron Isotopes Has Potential As A Tool In Oceanography; 'We Are Excited By Our Findings'
Southampton, U.K. - Jul 31, 2009 17:53 EST

New research involving scientists from the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS) highlights the potential utility of iron isotopes for addressing important questions in ocean science. The findings are published in the August edition of the journal Geology. Large regions of the...
 
Australia's First Full Coral Genome Project Gets Green Light; 'A Genuine First For Australian Science'
Queensland, Australia - Jul 30, 2009 15:37 EST

One of the corals that form the backbone of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is to become the first complex animal to have its genes fully explored in Australia. Plans to sequence the entire genome of Acropora millepora, a branching...
 
California Fish Doctor Cares For Watery Clientele; 'Fish Health' Veterinarian 'Fairly Uncommon'
Davis, California - Jul 30, 2009 15:04 EST

If a combined sequel of the films “Dr. Doolittle” and “Finding Nemo” is ever made, Hollywood will undoubtedly come looking for Scott Weber. A veterinarian trained in the health needs of fish and other aquatic species, Weber leads the new Aquatic...
 
Scientists To Explore 'Living Lights' On The Deep Sea Floor; Bioluminescence 'Common In All The World’s Oceans'
Fort Lauderdale, Florida - Jul 29, 2009 21:55 EST

The deep ocean floor beyond the reach of sunlight provides one of nature’s most impressive light shows. Scientists from Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute at Florida Atlantic University, Duke University, the Ocean Research & Conservation Association (ORCA), the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research...
 
Researchers: Jellyfish Linked To Large-scale Ocean Mixing; 'Like A Human Swimming Through Honey'
Pasadena, California - Jul 29, 2009 21:48 EST

Using a combination of theoretical modeling, energy calculations, and field observations, researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have for the first time described a mechanism that explains how some of the ocean's tiniest swimming animals can have a...
 
Researchers: Sedimentary Evidence Proves Amazon River 11 Million Years Old
Liverpool, U.K. - Jul 29, 2009 21:37 EST

Researchers at the University of Liverpool have discovered that the Amazon river, and its transcontinental drainage, is around 11 million years old and took its present shape about 2.4 million years ago. University of Liverpool researchers, in collaboration with the University...
 
Study: Human Activity Damaging The Oceans, 'Threatening Human Food Security'
Townsville, Queensland - Jul 29, 2009 21:33 EST

Mounting evidence that human activity is changing the world’s oceans in profound and damaging ways is outlined in a new scientific discussion paper released today. Man-made carbon emissions “are affecting marine biological processes from genes to ecosystems over scales from rock...
 
Scientists: Fish Discovered With New Type Of Cell That Can Sense Light; 'This Is Mind-boggling'
Baltimore, Maryland - Jul 28, 2009 22:44 EST

Nearly all species have some ability to detect light. At least three types of cells in the retina allow us to see images or distinguish between night and day. Now, researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine have discovered...
 
Freshwater Fish At The Top Of The Food Chain Evolve More Slowly; 'Fish Make Great Fish Food'
Durham, North Carolina - Jul 28, 2009 21:46 EST

For avid fishermen and anglers, the largemouth bass is a favorite freshwater fish with an appetite for minnows. A new study finds that once they evolved to eat other fish, largemouth bass and fellow fish-feeders have remained relatively unchanged compared...
 
Maine Shark Fishing Tournament Announced To 'Raise Money For A Good Cause'
Portland, Maine - Jul 28, 2009 21:29 EST

[Editor's correction: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that "the State of Maine offers a $10,000 prize for a shark" that breaks a state record. The sentence should have stated "tournament organizers are offering a $10,000 prize...
 
NOAA: Smaller, More Concentrated 'Dead Zone' In The Gulf Of Mexico; 'Short-term Weather Patterns' Eyed
Washington, D.C. - Jul 28, 2009 08:21 EST

NOAA-supported scientists, led by Nancy Rabalais, Ph.D., from the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON), found the size of this year's Gulf of Mexico dead zone to be smaller than forecasted, measuring 3,000 square miles. However the dead zone, which is...
 
Poll: UK Public Want Salmon Without Seal Killings; 'The Tide Is Turning'
London, England - Jul 27, 2009 21:56 EST

Campaigners’ seeking an end to what they believe is the slaughter of thousands of seals in Scottish waters by the salmon industry every year today released the results of a new poll revealing that the majority of the UK public...
 
Florida Officials: Lobster Poaching Pretty Pricey; 'Penalties Can Be Stiff'
Tallahassee, Florida - Jul 27, 2009 21:41 EST

It’s known as “poaching,” so if you think taking over the bag limit, out-of-season lobsters, or lobsters from a sanctuary is OK, you may want to talk to the people recently penalized for doing just that. During “Operation Freezer Burn” the...
 
NOAA Proposes Measures To Rebuild Blacknose And Other Shark Populations
Washington, D.C. - Jul 24, 2009 16:43 EST

NOAA’s Fisheries Service is proposing several measures to end overfishing and rebuild blacknose sharks and other shark populations. Nine public hearings will be held on the proposal, from New England to the Gulf of Mexico, in August and September. “Our latest...
 
Researchers: Warming Oceans Mean Less Cloud Cover; 'A Vicious Cycle Potentially Exacerbating Global Warming'
Virginia Key, Florida - Jul 24, 2009 16:32 EST

The role of clouds in climate change has been a major question for decades. As the earth warms under increasing greenhouse gases, it is not known whether clouds will dissipate, letting in more of the sun's heat energy and making...
 
Researchers: Sea Lampreys Jettison One-fifth Of Their Genome During Development
Seattle, Washington - Jul 23, 2009 16:44 EST

Researchers have discovered that the sea lamprey, which emerged from jawless fish first appearing 500 million years ago, dramatically remodels its genome. Shortly after a fertilized lamprey egg divides into several cells, the growing embryo discards millions of units of...
 
Researcher Sheds Light On 'Man-eating' Squid; 'I Was Surprised At How Timid They Were'
Kingston, Rhode Island - Jul 23, 2009 15:36 EST

News reports last week about scuba divers off San Diego being menaced by large numbers of Humboldt's or jumbo squid have raised the ire of University of Rhode Island biologist Brad Seibel. As a leading expert on the species who...
 
NOAA: Coral Bleaching Likely In Caribbean; Similar Conditions May Develop In Gulf Of Mexico And Central Pacific
Washington, D.C. - Jul 22, 2009 17:26 EST

Scientists from NOAA’s Coral Reef Watch Program say conditions are favorable for significant coral bleaching and infectious coral disease outbreaks in the Caribbean, especially in the Lesser Antilles. The forecast is based on the July NOAA Coral Reef Watch outlook,...
 
Dutch Harbor-Unalaska, Alaska And New Bedford, Massachusetts, Remain Top Fishing Ports
Washington, D.C. - Jul 22, 2009 16:40 EST

Commercial fishermen unloaded 612.7 million pounds of fish and shellfish at the port of Dutch Harbor-Unalaska, Alaska, in 2008, mostly pollock, making it the country’s top port for the amount of fish landed for the 20th consecutive year, NOAA’s Fisheries...
 
Study: Fish Fear Their Census-takers; Using Snorkelers And Scuba Divers To Count 'Not Accurate'
Washington, D.C. - Jul 22, 2009 00:16 EST

Using snorkelers and SCUBA divers is not the best way to monitor fish populations, if we want to know the evolutionary effects of overfishing. The fish population in coral reef areas is often assessed by snorkelers or SCUBA divers, but new...
 
Study: Ocean Health Plays Vital Role In Coral Reef Recovery; Healthy Corals 'Clearly Are More Resilient'
San Diego, California - Jul 21, 2009 21:02 EST

The new research study led by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego suggests that by improving overall ocean health, corals are better able to recover from bleaching events, which occur when rising sea temperatures force corals...
 
Rare Sea Turtle Rescued By Mote After Swallowing Balloon; 'It's Extremely Common'
Sarasota, Florida - Jul 20, 2009 22:12 EST

An endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempii) has been brought to Mote Marine Laboratory's Sea Turtle Hospital after it swallowed a balloon - an episode that we hope will remind residents and visitors to stow their trash carefully. The 3.3-pound...
 
Florida Scientists Unveil New Seasonal Hurricane Forecasting Model; 'The Hard Part Is In The Waiting'
Tallahassee, Florida - Jul 20, 2009 21:56 EST

Scientists at The Florida State University's Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS) have developed a new computer model that they hope will predict with unprecedented accuracy how many hurricanes will occur in a given season. After about five years developing and...
 
Bahamian Scientist’s Turtle Research To Be Published In Major Science Journal; 'the Highlight Of My Scientific Career'
Charleston, North Carolina - Jul 20, 2009 21:43 EST

A young Bahamian scientist’s groundbreaking study on freshwater turtles has earned him the opportunity to be featured in one of the world’s leading international journals. Stefan Moss, who spent two years collecting samples and data from the reptiles he encountered...
 
Study: Ganges River Dolphin In Dire Straits; 'Their Habitat Is Also Being Degraded By Human Activities'
Washington, D.C. - Jul 20, 2009 21:19 EST

Dolphin hotspots must be protected if the Ganges River Dolphin (Platanista gangetica gangetica) is to survive in the Brahmaputra river system, according to a recent study. Estimates have put the total population of the Ganges River Dolphins at around 2,000. Out...
 
Study: Could Cannon Balls From The Early 19th Century Really Sink Warships?
Haifa, Israel - Jul 20, 2009 21:06 EST

A joint experiment carried out by researchers from the Leon Recanati Institute for Maritime Studies at the University of Haifa and staff of Rafael Advanced Defense Systems Ltd. has solved the riddle that has been puzzling researchers ever since they...
 
Shark Week Is Back... And Its Got Bite! Shark Week 2009 Schedule Released
Miami, Florida - Jul 19, 2009 18:54 EST

Shark Week, cable television's longest-running programming event is back for its 22nd year. Shark Week 2009 will kick off on Sunday August 2, with a two hour hair-raising special about the true story behind Jaws. During the week, Survivorman,...
 
Santa Margarita Shipwreck 'Ghost Trail' Reveals Broken Anchor And Rock; 'Impact Zone' Elusive
Key West, Florida - Jul 17, 2009 18:56 EST

For the past four years, Keith Webb’s Blue Water Ventures Key West, a joint venture partner of Mel Fisher’s Treasures, has been searching for – and discovering – sunken treasures of silver, gold, and pearls in the waters near the...
 
Scientists Say That Microbial Mats In Shallow Water Built 3.4-Billion-Year-Old Stromatolites
Pasadena, California - Jul 16, 2009 16:49 EST

Stromatolites are dome- or column-like sedimentary rock structures that are formed in shallow water, layer by layer, over long periods of geologic time. Now, researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) have provided...
 
Researchers Reveal Sexual Habits Of The 'Dinosaurs Of The Sea'; First Evidence Of 'Complex Foreplay'
Perth, Australia - Jul 15, 2009 21:55 EST

A Perth-led international research team has found that the males of some ancient fish species — known as dinosaurs of the sea — had erectile elements used to impregnate females, just like modern day sharks. The research led by Curtin...
 
Scientists Report First Remote, Underwater Detection Of Harmful Algae, Toxins
Washington, D.C. - Jul 14, 2009 22:30 EST

Scientists at NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) have successfully conducted the first remote detection of a harmful algal species and its toxin below the ocean’s surface. The achievement was recently...
 
NOAA Bans Commercial Harvesting Of Krill; 'The Foundation For A Healthy Marine Ecosystem'
Washington, D.C. - Jul 14, 2009 22:04 EST

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) today published a final rule in the Federal Register prohibiting the harvesting of krill in the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) off the coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington. The rule goes into effect...
 
Researchers: Shark Cage Diving Operations Off Hawaii Are Safe; 'No Increase In Shark Attacks'
Manoa, Hawaii - Jul 14, 2009 21:24 EST

A study by five university researchers—including four from the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa—concludes that existing shark cage diving enterprises in Hawai‘i have a negligible effect on public safety. The paper, “Seasonal cycles and long-term trends in abundance and species composition...
 
Experts: Microplankton Survived Mass Extinction By Leading A Double Life, Hiding On The Seafloor
Nottingham, U.K. - Jul 14, 2009 20:54 EST

Drifting across the world's oceans are a group of unicellular marine microorganisms that are not only a crucial source of food for other marine life — but their fossils, which are found in abundance, provide scientists with an extraordinary record...
 
Ancient Shipwreck Found Off Dominican Coast; 'Finding Sunken Treasure Is A Fantasy'
Miami, Florida - Jul 9, 2009 16:19 EST

Marine Exploration, Inc. and joint venture partner Hispaniola Ventures, LLC recently located a previously undiscovered shipwreck on the North West Reef of the Silver Bank, Dominican Republic. The artifacts recovered during the proofing excavations have proved to date the ship...
 
Underwater Exploration Seeks Evidence Of Early Americans; 'We Have Found The Haystack'
Erie, Pennsylvania - Jul 9, 2009 16:16 EST

Where the first Americans came from, when they arrived and how they got here is as lively a debate as ever, only most of the research to date has focused on dry land excavations. But, last summer’s pivotal underwater exploration...
 



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