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Americas Newswire

Ocean Animal Trackers Collaborate On New Google Earth For Oceans; 'Its An Important Evolution'
Pacific Grove, California - Feb 2, 2009 20:28 EST

A consortium of researchers led by Stanford University Professor Barbara Block collaborated with Google for more than a year, providing animal tracking data for the new Google Earth release, which features a three-dimensional, interactive ocean. In the animal tracking layer,...
 
Geologists: Ancient Turtle Migrated From Asia To America Over A Tropical Arctic; C02 Fueled Polar Heat?
Rochester, New YOrk - Feb 1, 2009 18:12 EST

In Arctic Canada, a team of geologists from the University of Rochester has discovered a surprise fossil: a tropical, freshwater, Asian turtle. The find strongly suggests that animals migrated from Asia to North America not around Alaska, as once thought,...
 
Scientists: 'Hot Spot' For Toxic Harmful Algal Blooms Discovered Off Washington Coast
Arlington, Virginia - Jan 31, 2009 17:00 EST

A part of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, which separates Washington state from Canada's British Columbia, is a potential "hot spot" for toxic harmful algal blooms affecting the Washington and British Columbia coasts. Marine scientists found that under certain conditions,...
 
Research: Ocean Islands Fuel Productivity And Carbon Sequestration Through Natural Iron Fertilization
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Jan 30, 2009 18:45 EST

An experiment to study the effects of naturally deposited iron in the Southern Ocean has filled in a key piece of the puzzle surrounding iron's role in locking atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ocean. The research, conducted by an...
 
Study: Sinking Bales Of Crop Residue In The Deep Ocean Could Cut Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide
Seattle, Washington - Jan 29, 2009 14:22 EST

Making bales with 30 percent of global crop residues – the stalks and such left after harvesting – and then sinking the bales into the deep ocean could reduce the build up of global carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by...
 
Scientists: Good Weather Conditions Cited As Record Number Of Manatees Counted In Latest Florida Survey
Miami, Florida - Jan 28, 2009 18:37 EST

A team of scientists counted an all-time-high number of manatees during the annual manatee synoptic survey conducted the week of Jan. 19. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) Fish and Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI) reported a preliminary count...
 
Emperor Penguins March Toward Extinction? 'They Adapt Slowly'
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Jan 26, 2009 20:58 EST

Popularized by the 2005 movie “March of the Penguins,” emperor penguins could be headed toward extinction in at least part of their range before the end of the century, according to a paper by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) researchers...
 
Ocean Research Officials Hail Completion Of Modernization For US Scientific Ocean Drilling Vessel
Washington, D.C. - Jan 26, 2009 20:32 EST

Senior officials from the U.S. National Science Foundation and the U.S. Implementing Organization for the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program today marked the occasion of the research vessel JOIDES Resolution sailing off from Singapore for science sea trials and transit to...
 
NOAA Gives Navy Marine Mammal Protection Measures For Sonar Training Off Hawaii
Washington, D.C. - Jan 23, 2009 19:22 EST

NOAA’s Fisheries Service has issued regulations and a letter of authorization to the U.S. Navy to impact marine mammals while conducting training exercises around the main Hawaiian Islands. The regulations require the Navy to implement measures designed to protect and...
 
Scientists Solves Deepsea Mystery: Three Fish Are All The Same; 'An Incredibly Significant And Exciting Finding'
Washington, D.C. - Jan 23, 2009 19:12 EST

For decades scientists have known about three different fishes called tapetails, bignose fishes and whalefishes. A team of scientists, including Smithsonian ichthyologist Dave Johnson, however, have recently discovered that they are actually all part of the same family. The team’s...
 
Gift Of Caviar May Be Product Of Endangered Species' Illegal Harvest; 'The Pressure To Act Is Increasing'
Cookeville, Tennessee - Jan 23, 2009 18:47 EST

Tennessee Tech University professor and U.S. Geological Survey researcher Phil Bettoli and colleagues accompanied commercial fishermen in Tennessee during the 2007 fishing season and estimated that hundreds of large, mature pallid sturgeon have been illegally harvested in recent years for...
 
Geologist: Danube Delta Holds Answers To 'Noah’s Flood' Debate; 'No Evidence For A Catastrophic Flood'
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Jan 23, 2009 18:29 EST

Did a catastrophic flood of biblical proportions drown the shores of the Black Sea 9,500 years ago, wiping out early Neolithic settlements around its perimeter? A geologist with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and two Romanian colleagues report in...
 
Study: Food Choices And Location Influence California Sea Otter Exposure To Disease
Reston, Virginia - Jan 21, 2009 18:12 EST

Sea otters living along the central California coast risk higher exposure to disease-causing parasites as a consequence of the food they eat and where they feed. Sea otters that eat small marine snails are at a higher risk of exposure to...
 
Coastal Barrier Island Researchers Learn Lessons From Ike Destruction; 'There Is No Answer Yet'
Galveston, Texas - Jan 21, 2009 17:09 EST

When more than 20 coastal barrier island researchers arrived on Galveston Island in early January, many had never seen the level of destruction wrought by Hurricane Ike. They came from New England, the Pacific coast and all points between where ocean...
 
Research: Fish Shows The More Promiscuous The Female, The Speedier The Sperm
Hamilton, Ontario - Jan 20, 2009 18:34 EST

Female promiscuity appears to have triggered changes in the type of sperm a male produces, according to new research on fish from central Africa. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, examines...
 
Chemical Come-on Successfully Lures Love-sick Lampreys To Traps; 'It's Very Potent'
East Lansing, Michigan - Jan 20, 2009 18:17 EST

A synthetic chemical version of what male sea lampreys use to attract spawning females can lure them into traps and foil the mating process of the destructive invasive species, according to Michigan State University scientists. Pheromones, chemical scents used to attract...
 
Research: Nile Delta Fishery Grows Dramatically Thanks To Run-off Of Sewage, Fertilizers
Narragansett, Rhode Island - Jan 20, 2009 16:05 EST

While many of the world’s fisheries are in serious decline, the coastal Mediterranean fishery off the Nile Delta has expanded dramatically since the 1980s. The surprising cause of this expansion, which followed a collapse of the fishery after completion of...
 
Bacterial Pathogens And Rising Temperatures Threaten Coral Health; Vibrio Linked To Yellow Band Disease
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Jan 20, 2009 10:56 EST

Coral reefs around the world are in serious trouble from pollution, over-fishing, climate change and more. The last thing they need is an infection. But that’s exactly what yellow band disease (YBD) is—a bacterial infection that sickens coral colonies. Researchers...
 
Study: Swings In North Atlantic Oscillation Variability Linked To Climate Warming
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Jan 16, 2009 17:18 EST

Using a 218-year-long temperature record from a Bermuda brain coral, researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) have created the first marine-based reconstruction showing the long-term behavior of one of the most important drivers of climate fluctuations in the...
 
Research Vessel To Test Iron Fertilization In The Southern Ocean
Bremerhaven, Germany - Jan 16, 2009 17:10 EST

The German research vessel Polarstern is currently on its way to the Southwest Atlantic Sector of the Southern Ocean. The team of 48 scientists (30 from India) on board left Cape Town on 7th January to carry out the Indo-German...
 
Florida Fisherman Pleads Guilty To Bombing Fish-eating Dolphins
Panama City, Florida - Jan 16, 2009 15:29 EST

Acting United States Attorney Thomas F. Kirwin, Northern District of Florida, announced today that Garry Alvin Key, a/k/a, “Alvy Stancle Key, Jr.,” 50, of Panama City, Florida, pled guilty in United States District Court in Panama City to a two-count...
 
2 Billion Tons: Researcher Gives First-ever Estimate Of Worldwide Fish Biomass And Impact On Climate Change
British Columbia, Canada - Jan 15, 2009 15:24 EST

Are there really plenty of fish in the sea? University of British Columbia fisheries researcher Villy Christensen gives the first-ever estimate of total fish biomass in our oceans: Two billion tonnes. And fish play a previously unrecognized but significant role in...
 
NOAA To Work With Six Identified Nations To Address Illegal, Unreported, And Unregulated Fishing
Washington, D.C. - Jan 13, 2009 21:52 EST

“Illegal fishing is a global problem that is depleting fish stocks and hurting the economies of nations and the livelihoods of people who depend on sustainable fishing,” said Dr. Jim Balsiger, NOAA acting assistant administrator for NOAA’s Fisheries Service. “Our...
 
U.S. Pacific Coast Shark Attack Statistics For 2008 Released; Reported Attacks Up Dramatically In New Century
Los Angeles, California - Jan 13, 2009 08:58 EST

New statistics for shark attacks during 2008 along the United States are now available. There were 5 unprovoked shark attacks confirmed from the Pacific Coast of North America during 2008, which is slightly more than half of the total...
 
NOAA: Saltwater Recreational Fishermen $31 Billion Boon For U.S. Economy
Washington, D.C. - Jan 12, 2009 21:27 EST

Recreational saltwater anglers pumped more than $31 billion into the U.S. economy in 2006, with Florida, Texas, California, Louisiana, and North Carolina receiving the largest share according to a new study issued by NOAA’s Fisheries Service. At the national level, saltwater...
 
Study: Decline Of Carbon Dioxide-gobbling Plankton Coincided With Ancient Global Cooling
Ithica, New York - Jan 8, 2009 18:03 EST

The evolutionary history of diatoms -- abundant oceanic plankton that remove billions of tons of carbon dioxide from the air each year -- needs to be rewritten, according to a new Cornell study. The findings suggest that after a sudden...
 
Ocean Core 'Treasures' Stored At Texas A&M's IODP Repository; 'It's A Slice Through The Layers'
College Station, Texas - Jan 8, 2009 14:35 EST

Priceless treasure from the bottom of the sea is locked away at Texas A&M University, stacked on floor-to-ceiling racks and kept secure in 15,000 square feet of refrigerated space. Although it's not gold bullion or precious gems, this treasure dazzles...
 
Surprising Return Of North Atlantic Circulation Pump; Sea Ice Decline May Actually Have Aided Ocean Overturning
Falmouth, Massachusetts - Jan 6, 2009 22:25 EST

One of the “pumps” contributing to the ocean’s global circulation suddenly switched on again last winter for the first time this decade, scientists reported Tuesday (Dec. 23) in Nature Geoscience. The finding surprised scientists, who had been wondering if global...
 
NOAA: Report Finds Commercial And Recreational Fishing Generated More Than Two Million Jobs
Wasington, D.C. - Jan 6, 2009 22:15 EST

U.S. commercial and recreational fishing generated more than $185 billion in sales and supported more than two million jobs in 2006, according to a new economic report released by NOAA’s Fisheries Service. The commercial fishing industry — harvesters, seafood processors and...
 
Florida: 337 Document Manatee Deaths In 2008, Slightly Lower Than 5-year Average
Tallahassee, Florida - Jan 5, 2009 22:42 EST

Biologists with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s (FWC) Fish and Wildlife Research Institute documented 337 manatee carcasses in state waters in 2008. The low number of red tide-related mortalities last year helped the number of documented manatee deaths...
 
Study: Can Nature's Leading Indicators Presage Environmental Disaster?
Madison, Wisconsin - Jan 5, 2009 21:56 EST

Economists use leading indicators — the drivers of economic performance – to take the temperature of the economy and predict the future. Now, in a new study, scientists take a page from the social science handbook and use leading indicators of...
 
NOAA: Researchers Identify Wintering Ground And Potential Breeding Ground In The Gulf Of Maine
Washington, D.C. - Jan 1, 2009 11:56 EST

A large number of North Atlantic right whales have been seen in the Gulf of Maine in recent days, leading right whale researchers at NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center to believe they have identified a wintering ground and potentially a...
 
UnderwaterTimes.com's Weirdest Underwater Stories Of 2008
Miami, Florida - Dec 29, 2008 16:25 EST

What do mutant catfish, Robbie Williams, Chinese fish urinals, a lucky lizard and topless fishing all have in common? They all made the list of the weirdest underwater stories from 2008. The year's weird underwater news proved once again that...
 
Whale Wars Wins Ratings Battle; Series Maiden Voyage Is Animal Planet's Most Watched Series Ever
Silver Spring, Maryland - Dec 23, 2008 17:12 EST

Animal Planet's WHALE WARS stormed audiences on its second voyage delivering more than 1.1 million viewers (1.153M P2+), the network's best performing Friday primetime telecast in five years. The momentum for the series grew in its second week garnering...
 
Could Deep-Sea Microbes Teach Us About Alien Life? 'Black Smokers' Home To 'Microbial Zoo'
Amherst, Massachusetts - Dec 23, 2008 16:17 EST

Hovering in a tiny submarine 1.4 miles beneath the Pacific Ocean, a University of Massachusetts Amherst microbiologist felt as if he were in a time machine, witnessing the ancient past, or a scientist’s fantasy future. Just inches away, an undersea...
 
China’s Largest Shopping Sites, Alibaba And Taobao, To Ban Shark Fin Sales, Fight Illegal Wildlife Crime
Beijing, China - Dec 23, 2008 12:43 EST

The International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW - www.ifaw.org.cn) has announced that Taobao (www.taobao.com.cn), China's largest shopping website, will soon halt the sale of shark fin products on the site. Taobao.com has told its 400 million online members that...
 
Biofuel Development Shifting From Soil To Sea, Specifically To Marine Algae; 'It's Early But I'm Excited'
San Diego, California - Dec 20, 2008 16:45 EST

Bell-bottoms… Designer jeans… Disco… Big hair… Gas shortages. Some icons of the 1970s are emblazoned in the memories of those old enough to remember. A few styles, to the dismay of many, have come back in vogue—oil-related crises among them. Broad...
 
Massive Coral Bleaching Could Decimate SE Asia’s Coral Triangle This Winter
Washington, D.C. - Dec 19, 2008 18:17 EST

Potentially widespread and severe coral bleaching is predicted this winter, which could cause immense damage to some of the world's most important marine environments including the Coral Triangle of SE Asia and the Western Pacific, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF)...
 
China's Largest Shopping Site Bans Sale Of Shark Fin Products; 'Consuming Wildlife Equals Killing'
Beijing, China - Dec 19, 2008 15:38 EST

The International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW-www.ifaw.org.cn) congratulates Taobao (www.taobo.com.cn), China's largest shopping website for its ban on the sale of shark fin products on the site. Taobao.com announced to its 400 million online members that all shark fin products...
 
Shrinkage: Sport Diver Purchases Scuba Diving Magazine As F+W Media Exits Scuba Marketplace
Winter Park, Florida - Dec 18, 2008 11:01 EST

Bonnier Corporation, publisher of Sport Diver, today announced the purchase of Scuba Diving magazine from F+W Media Inc. The acquisition positions Bonnier as the dominant media company in the dive industry and expands its presence as the pre-eminent enthusiast sports...
 

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