Subscription Services: Subscribe | Change | Unsubscribe | RSS
Advertising Media Kit: Introduction | Rates | Testimonial | Contact
Miscellaneous: Reference Desk | Sitemap

Breaking Newswire

Stranded Dolphin Rescued From The Wild Ready For New Home At Zoo; 'Taz Has Been A Wonderful Little Patient'
Sarasota, Florida - Feb 24, 2011 09:00 EST

The young bottlenose dolphin brought to Mote after stranding on a sandbar off Sanibel Island will soon be moving to a new permanent home. "Taz," a male dolphin estimated to be about 6 months old at stranding, was brought to Mote's...
 
Tiny Water Flea Has Large Effect On Lake Huron; 'A Key Predator On Zooplankton'
Ann Arbor, Michigan - Feb 23, 2011 19:00 EST

An invasive species, the spiny water flea, is likely a primary driver of changes in Lake Huron's food web over the past decade, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study. The USGS research suggests that consumption of prey by...
 
Oldest Fossils Of Large Seaweeds, Worm-Like Animals Tell Story Of Ancient Oxygen; 'Preserved In Pristine Condition'
Arlington, Virginia - Feb 23, 2011 18:33 EST

Almost 600 million years ago, before the rapid evolution of life forms known as the Cambrian explosion, a community of seaweeds and worm-like animals lived in a quiet deep-water niche near what is now Lantian, a small village in south...
 
Analysis: 75% Of World's Coral Reefs Currently Under Threat From Local, Global Pressures; 'A Wake-Up Call'
Washington, D.C. - Feb 23, 2011 18:24 EST

A new comprehensive analysis finds that 75 percent of the world's coral reefs are currently threatened by local and global pressures. For the first time, the analysis includes threats from climate change, including warming seas and rising ocean acidification. The...
 
Semporna May Have Richest Marine Biodiversity In The World; Fish Species Counts Rival The Philippines, Greater Than Indonesia
Amsterdam, The Netherlands - Feb 23, 2011 18:12 EST

The preliminary results of the Semporna Marine Ecological Expedition (December 2010) indicate that Semporna may have the world's highest marine biodiversity. The expedition yielded a record number of 43 species of mushroom corals. Furthermore, some new species were discovered, among...
 
NOAA Begins National Survey Of The Economic Contributions Of Saltwater Angling
Silver Spring, Maryland - Feb 22, 2011 18:22 EST

NOAA is again surveying saltwater anglers across the nation to update and improve estimates of the overall economic contributions of saltwater recreational fishing to the U.S. economy. "The money that millions of recreational anglers spend on fishing trips each year...
 
International Consortium Formed To Study Fertilizing Oceans With Iron; 'An Important First Step'
Narragansett, Rhode Island - Feb 22, 2011 18:08 EST

The University of Rhode Island is helping to create an international oceanographic consortium to study the potential affects of fertilizing the oceans with iron in an effort to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and mitigate the...
 
Scientists Observe: Krill Do It Deep In The Southern Ocean; 'Chase', 'Probe', 'Embrace', 'Flex' And 'Push'
Kingston, Tasmania - Feb 21, 2011 22:10 EST

In a world first, the sex life of Antarctic Krill in the wild has been caught on camera revealing the shrimp-like creatures are able to mate deeper in the ocean than previously thought. Scientists from the Australian Antarctic Division have used...
 
Reunion Island Surfer Attacked By Shark, Loses Leg; 'Sharks Are Unpredictable'
Saint-Denis, Reunion - Feb 20, 2011 17:44 EST

A surfer has lost his leg in a shark attack off the western shore of Reunion, a French island located in the Indian Ocean, east of Madagascar. The attack occurred Saturday at 6 pm at Three Rocks, Saint-Gilles, in an area...
 
Archaeologists: Irish Medieval Fishing Site Will Be 'Lost To The Tide'
Dublin, Ireland - Feb 18, 2011 22:47 EST

One of Europe's best preserved medieval fishing structures located on the Fergus Estuary in County Clare, Ireland, will be washed away by tidal flows before archaeologists can reveal its secrets. A team of University College Dublin archaeologists who have been visiting...
 
Researchers: Fishing Down Food Web Leaves Fewer Big Fish, More Small Fish In Past Century
Vancouver, British Columbia - Feb 18, 2011 22:41 EST

Predatory fish such as cod, tuna, and groupers have declined by two-thirds over the past 100 years, while small forage fish such as sardine, anchovy and capelin have more than doubled over the same period, according to University of British...
 
Scientists: Pollution Triggers Genetic Resistance Mechanism In A Coastal Fish; 'Natural Selection'
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Feb 17, 2011 16:54 EST

For 30 years, two General Electric facilities released about 1.3 million pounds of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) into New York's Hudson River, devastating and contaminating fish populations. Some 50 years later, one type of fish—the Atlantic tomcod—has not only survived but...
 
Scientists: First Identification Of Endocrine Disruptors In Algae Blooms
Plymouth, United Kingdom - Feb 16, 2011 22:16 EST

Scientists are reporting for the first time that previously unrecognized substances released by algae blooms have the potential to act as endocrine disruptors, which can interfere with the normal activity of reproductive hormones. The effect is not caused by microcystin...
 
Scientists Trial Ocean Temperature Forecasts For Aussie Fish Farms
Canberra, Australia - Feb 16, 2011 18:48 EST

While land farmers have used seasonal forecasting for nearly a decade, marine farmers in south-east Australia have sought the technology for a region identified as a climate change hotspot, with rates of ocean warming up to four times the global...
 
Study: Predictor Says 1/3 Of Coral Reef Fish At Risk Extinction
Townsville, Queensland - Feb 15, 2011 21:56 EST

More than a third of coral reef fish species are in jeopardy of local extinction from the impacts of climate change on coral reefs, a new scientific study has found. (Local extinction refers to the loss of species from individual...
 
Scientists: Rising Seas Will Affect Major Us Coastal Cities By 2100; 'Like A Block Of Ice On The Sidewalk In The Summertime'
Tucson, Arizona - Feb 15, 2011 21:32 EST

Rising sea levels could threaten an average of 9 percent of the land within 180 U.S. coastal cities by 2100, according to new research led by University of Arizona scientists. The Gulf and southern Atlantic coasts will be particularly hard...
 
Lawsuit Launched To Protect Endangered Whales From Gulf Of Mexico Oil Exploration; 'The Feds Are Still Violating The Laws'
San Francisco, California - Feb 14, 2011 20:32 EST

The Center for Biological Diversity, Gulf Restoration Network, Natural Resources Defense Council and Sierra Club filed a formal notice of intent to sue Interior Secretary Ken Salazar Wednesday for ignoring marine-mammal protection laws when approving offshore oil and gas activities...
 
More Deep-Sea Vents Discovered In The Southern Ocean; 'The Excitement Was Almost Overwhelming'
Southampton, U.K. - Feb 14, 2011 20:28 EST

Scientists aboard the Royal Research Ship James Cook have discovered a new set of deep-sea volcanic vents in the chilly waters of the Southern Ocean. The discovery is the fourth made by the research team in three years, which suggests...
 
Female Angler Snags World Record Blue Tilapia; 'It Was Always My Mission To Catch A Record [fish]'
Tallahassee, Florida - Feb 14, 2011 12:25 EST

It's official. Pamela Henry of Stuart broke state and world records when she reeled in a 9.6-pound blue tilapia last August. The fish measured 24 inches long. A taxidermist is mounting the record-breaking fish. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation...
 
SeaWorld Will Likely Ask Judge To Close OSHA Hearings, Seal 'Unfounded Allegations' From The Public
St. Pete Beach, Florida - Feb 13, 2011 16:43 EST

It is anticipated that an Orlando Judge will be asked to sign a "Protective Order" for an upcoming SeaWorld vs. OSHA hearing, effectively sealing off the details of this high profile case forever. The proceedings before Federal Judge Ben...
 
Pheromone Linked To Aggressive Behavior In Squid; 'the Extremely Competitive Aggression Has A Payoff'
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Feb 12, 2011 17:57 EST

Scientists have identified a pheromone produced by female squid that triggers immediate and dramatic fighting in male squid that come into contact with it. The aggression-producing pheromone, believed to be the first of its kind discovered in any marine animal,...
 
Cold-Stunned Sea Turtles Returning To Wild Off South Texas Coast After Freeze; 'We Saved These Turtles' Lives'
South Padre Island, Texas - Feb 11, 2011 19:28 EST

Hundreds of rare sea turtles stunned by the longest spate of sub-freezing days in decades in South Texas are to be returned to the wild today and tomorrow. As of this morning, more than 800 sea turtles had been rescued...
 
When Nature Calls: Biologists Unlock Chemical Clues To Courtship In Swordtail Urine
College Station, Texas - Feb 10, 2011 16:02 EST

When you've got to go, you've got to go — upstream, that is, if you are a male swordtail fish seeking a mate, according to research from Texas A&M University. A recent study led by Texas A&M biologists Dr. Gil Rosenthal...
 
Researchers Find Piece In Eel Puzzle; 'Their Migration To The Coast Is Very Risky For Them'
Charlottenlund, Denmark - Feb 9, 2011 18:09 EST

Researchers in Denmark and Norway are on a quest to uncover the truth behind the dwindling number of eel stocks. The study is funded in part by the EELIAD ('European eels in the Atlantic: assessment of their decline') project, which...
 
Rowdy Residents Warn Crustaceans Away From Perilous Reefs; 'Clicks, Pops, Chirps And Scrapes'
Bristol, UK - Feb 8, 2011 23:04 EST

Coral reefs present a treacherous wall of mouths to flea-sized planktonic crustaceans, but the clamor generated by animals on the reef may act like a foghorn to warn them away from danger. In the first study to examine the response to...
 
Scientists Warn Of Damage To Deep Seabed; 'It Is A Very Serious Problem'
Southampton, United Kingdom - Feb 8, 2011 21:58 EST

More regulation is needed before the ocean floor suffers even more widespread damage, the scientists say. Better data on human activities – where they're taking place and how much harm they are causing – is also vital to let us...
 
Snookered: Employees At Four Florida Restaurants Cited For Buying Illegal Fish
Tallahassee, Florida - Feb 8, 2011 21:49 EST

Five employees at four Palm Beach County restaurants face misdemeanor charges as a result of a five-month investigation by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) into the illegal buying and selling of saltwater fish. Working on information obtained by...
 
NOAA, Partners, Launch New Website Highlighting African-American Maritime Heritage; 'Rich, Untold History'
Silver Spring, Maryland - Feb 8, 2011 21:31 EST

NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, in partnership with Murrain Associates, Inc., and the National Association of Black Scuba Divers (NABS), today launched Voyage to Discovery, a new website and education initiative highlighting untold stories of African-Americans and the sea....
 
Why Leatherback Turtles Linger In South Pacific Gyre, And Why It Matters; 'Feeding Behavior'
Palo Alto, California - Feb 8, 2011 19:16 EST

Leatherbacks. They are the Olympians of the turtle world – swimming farther, diving deeper and venturing into colder waters than any other marine turtle species. But for all their toughness, they have still suffered a 90 percent drop in their...
 
Angler Robert Pearson Lands More Than 200 Fish, But Misses The Cut And A Big Fish; 'I Never Got A Big One On The Line'
Clewiston, Florida - Feb 7, 2011 18:33 EST

Catching bass wasn't a problem for GEICO angler Robert Pearson during the FLW Tour season opener at Lake Okeechobee, catching the monsters was the big stumbling block. Pearson said he was snagging an average of more than 100 bass a day...
 
Shark Attacks Increase Worldwide; Florida Continues Four-Year Decline; 'You Should Have More Attacks Than The Previous Year'
Gainsville, Florida - Feb 7, 2011 12:15 EST

The number of reported shark attacks last year increased worldwide but declined in Florida, according to the University of Florida's International Shark Attack File annual report released today. Ichthyologist George Burgess, director of the file housed at the Florida Museum of...
 
Pollutants In Aquifers May Threaten Future Of Mexico's Fast-Growing 'Riviera Maya'
Shibuya-ku, Tokyo - Feb 6, 2011 16:35 EST

Pharmaceuticals, illicit drugs, shampoo, toothpaste, pesticides, chemical run-off from highways and many other pollutants infiltrate the giant aquifer under Mexico's "Riviera Maya," research shows. The wastes contaminate a vast labyrinth of water-filled caves under the popular tourist destination on the Yucatan...
 
Researchers: Arctic Fisheries' Catches 75 Times Higher Than Previous Reports; 'We Now Offer A More Accurate Baseline'
Vancouver, BC - Feb 4, 2011 19:02 EST

University of British Columbia researchers estimate that fisheries catches in the Arctic totaled 950,000 tonnes from 1950 to 2006, almost 75 times the amount reported to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) during this period. Led by Prof. Daniel...
 
Smithsonian Scientists Discover Seven New Species Of Fish; 'Current Concepts May Be Surprisingly Incomplete'
Washington, D.C. - Feb 4, 2011 18:52 EST

Things are not always what they seem when it comes to fish—something scientists at the Smithsonian Institution and the Ocean Science Foundation are finding out. Using modern genetic analysis, combined with traditional examination of morphology, the scientists discovered that what...
 
NOAA: Death Of Young Right Whale Highlights That Prevention Of Entanglements Is Key
Silver Spring, Maryland - Feb 4, 2011 17:57 EST

The death of a young right whale off Florida drives home the point that while disentanglement responses give the animals a better chance at survival, prevention of entanglements in fishing gear is paramount. On February 3, NOAA scientist Barb Zoodsma joined...
 
Scientists Find Part Of New Zealand's 'Eighth Wonder Of The World', Submerged 'Pink Terraces'
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Feb 4, 2011 17:21 EST

They were called the Eighth Wonder of the World. Until the late 19th century, New Zealand's Pink and White Terraces along Lake Rotomahana on the North Island, attracted tourists from around the world, interested in seeing the beautiful natural formations...
 
One Ocean: SeaWorld To Launch New Killer Whale Show; 'Rhe Whales Interact In New Ways With Trainers'
Orlando, Florida - Feb 3, 2011 12:33 EST

SeaWorld parks across the United States will debut an all-new killer whale show this spring and summer, connecting guests to the sea with a new level of energy, excitement and vibrancy as it educates and inspires them to make a...
 
90% Lost: New Survey Reveals Oysters At Risk Around The World
Reston, Virginia - Feb 3, 2011 09:56 EST

A new, wide-ranging survey that compares the past and present condition of oyster reefs around the globe finds that more than 90 percent of former reefs have been lost in most of the "bays" and ecoregions where the prized molluscs...
 
NOAA Attempts To Charge Oceana 16k For Release Of Sea Turtle Records; 'It Is Unconscionable'
Washington, D.C. - Feb 2, 2011 21:07 EST

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is seeking payment of more than $16,000 from Oceana in order to disclose documents of grave public concern about threatened sea turtles in U.S. waters. In late-March, Oceana submitted a Freedom of Information...
 
Oil's Well: NOAA Reopens More Than 4,000 Square Miles Of Gulf Waters To Royal Red Shrimping
New Orleans, Louisiana - Feb 2, 2011 18:45 EST

NOAA tomorrow will reopen 4,213 square miles of Gulf of Mexico federal waters off Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama to royal red shrimping. The area was closed to this type of deep water fishing on Nov. 24 as a precautionary measure...
 



bottom_left
bottom_right
Privacy Policy     © Copyright 2019 UnderwaterTimes.com. All rights reserved