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Scientists: Alligator Blood May Put The Bite On Antibiotic-resistant Infections
New Orleans, Louisiana - Apr 7, 2008 15:08 EST

Despite their reputation for deadly attacks on humans and pets, alligators are wiggling their way toward a new role as potential lifesavers in medicine, biochemists in Louisiana reported today at the 235th national meeting of the American Chemical Society. They...
 
Sydney Harbor's Contaminated Seaweeds A Deadly Diet For Sea Creatures
Sydney, Australia - Apr 7, 2008 14:24 EST

Contaminated seaweeds in Sydney Harbour could be threatening the small animals that feed on them, according to a new study revealing that the harbour's seaweeds have the world's highest levels of copper and lead contamination. Up to 75 percent of the...
 
Florida Topless Fishing Company Under Fire; 'Bikini Girl' Charters Drawing 'A Lot Of Calls'
Fort Myers, Florida - Apr 5, 2008 15:24 EST

Gil and Kathi Coombes have run charter boats for years, but it wasn't until January that their business really to took off. That's when they added "bikini girl" charters. "They will serve drinks and food and sandwiches and run out...
 
Freaky Fanged Fish Found In Utah Pond Stumps Experts; 'What Is This Thing?'
Brigham City, Utah - Apr 3, 2008 10:49 EST

Biologists are trying to identify a fish with large fangs that was found near a lake in Utah. So far, the identity of the strange fish has them stumped. Craig Schaugaard, Aquatic Manger for the Department of Wildlife Resources, said,...
 
Fish 'Eavesdropping' For Food Odors Connected To Global Climate Regulation
Wilmington, North Carolina - Apr 2, 2008 17:30 EST

Climate change may be predicted by fish who "eavesdrop" their way to healthy food sources using chemical cues given off by ocean organisms. This research, conducted by the University of North Carolina Wilmington assistant professor Sean Lema and collaborators, was...
 
Scientist: Anglerfish Found Off Indonesian Island May Represent New Vertebrate Family
Seattle, Washington - Apr 2, 2008 17:21 EST

A fish that would rather crawl into crevices than swim, and that may be able to see in the same way that humans do, could represent an entirely unknown family of fishes, says a University of Washington fish expert. The...
 
Researchers To Develop Ocean Sanctuary 'noise Budget' To Evaluate Potential Impact On Marine Mammals
Ithaca, New York - Apr 2, 2008 17:06 EST

Like sentinels at their posts, an array of buoys equipped with underwater microphones and other sensors will be on duty in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of Massachusetts for the next 30 months, recording sounds from...
 
Inaugural Peter Benchley Shark Conservation Award Given To Sawfish Advocate Matthew McDavitt
Princeton, New Jersey - Apr 2, 2008 04:54 EST

The Shark Research Institute created the Peter Benchley Shark Conservation Awards to honor the memory of the late Peter Benchley, and spotlight those who are working internationally to protect sharks as valuable ocean resources. The first of the 2008 Peter...
 
Research: Octopuses Flirt, Hold Hands, Guard Their Lovers; 'If You Watch Them, They Watch You Back'
Berkeley, California - Apr 1, 2008 05:42 EST

For decades, scientists have viewed octopuses as unromantic loners, with mating habits nearly devoid of complex behavior. But new research from the University of California, Berkeley, has found that at least one species of octopus engages in such sophisticated lovemaking...
 
Chilean Salmon Industry Responds To 'Boldly Erroneous' New York Times Article
Miami, Florida - Mar 31, 2008 14:23 EST

The following is being issued by Salmon of the Americans Inc. in response to the New York Times article, Salmon Virus Indicts Chile's Fishing Methods, by Alexei Barrionuevo: Considering the article written in the New York Times, our association must clarify...
 
Scientists Find That Squid Beak Is Both Hard And Soft, A Material That Engineers Want To Copy
Santa Barbara, California - Mar 27, 2008 12:24 EST

How did nature make the squid’s beak super hard and sharp –– allowing it, without harm to its soft body –– to capture its prey? The question has captivated those interested in creating new materials that mimic biological materials. The...
 
Maryland Angler Snags State Record 5-foot-long Blue Catfish; 'We Needed A Larger Net'
Fort Washington, Maryland - Mar 26, 2008 14:53 EST

Ron Lewis of Point of Rocks, Md. was fishing in the tidal Potomac River near Fort Washington on Sunday March 23 when he hooked and landed a new state record blue catfish. Ron who is an accomplished fisherman was targeting...
 
Researchers: Low Oxygen And Molybdenum In Ancient Oceans Delayed Evolution Of Life By 2 Billion Years
Riverside, California - Mar 26, 2008 13:51 EST

A deficiency of oxygen and the heavy metal molybdenum in the ancient deep ocean may have delayed the evolution of animal life on Earth by nearly two billion years, a study led by UC Riverside biogeochemists has found. The researchers...
 
Study: 'Climate Change' Will Alter Lake Tahoe's Water Mixing; 'Just Like Any Other Lake Or Pond'
Davis, California - Mar 25, 2008 13:44 EST

A new UC Davis study predicts that climate change will irreversibly alter water circulation in Lake Tahoe, radically changing the conditions for plants and fish in the lake -- and it could happen in 10 years. One likely result would be...
 
Researchers: 'Ballast-free Ship' Could Cut Costs While Blocking Aquatic Invaders; 'Like A Submarine'
Ann Arbor, Michigan - Mar 25, 2008 13:36 EST

University of Michigan researchers are investigating a radical new design for cargo ships that would eliminate ballast tanks, the water-filled compartments that enable non-native creatures to sneak into the Great Lakes from overseas. At least 185 non-native aquatic species have been...
 
Research: Pressure Sensing Shark Forecast Weather Changes
Aberdeen, U. K. - Mar 24, 2008 17:38 EST

Ground-breaking research which could lead to sharks being used to predict the weather has been carried out at Aberdeen’s National Hyperbaric Centre. Marine Biology student Lauren Smith is close to completing her PhD studies into the pressure sensing abilities of the...
 
Scientist: Coral's Addiction To 'Junk Food' Keyed By One Of Nature's Most Delicate And Complex Partnerships
Townsville, Australia - Mar 24, 2008 14:37 EST

Over two hundred million humans depend for their subsistence on the fact that coral has an addiction to ‘junk food’ - and orders its partners, the symbiotic algae, to make it. This curious arrangement is one of Nature’s most delicate...
 
Dr. Eugene Clark, Mote Marine Laboratory Founder, Receives Explorer's Club Medal; 'The Shark Lady'
New York, New York - Mar 23, 2008 13:11 EST

Mote founding director, Dr. Eugenie Clark, received the Explorers Club Medal during the organization’s annual dinner at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York City on Saturday, March 15. The award is the highest honor bestowed by the club, an international society...
 
Released Aquarium Great White Shark Reaches Mexico In Record Time; Near Real-Time Reports Track His Travels
Monterey, California - Mar 20, 2008 12:04 EST

A young white shark returned to the wild by the Monterey Bay Aquarium six weeks ago has traveled past the southern tip of Baja California and is heading toward waters off the Mexican mainland, according to data from an electronic...
 
Researchers Sharpen Search For New Marine Medicines With Novel Techniques
San Diego, California - Mar 19, 2008 13:00 EST

With the number of terrestrial sources that yield novel treatments for human disease decreasing year by year, the oceans have been tapped as a promising resource for discovering new natural biomedicines. Two studies by scientists at UC San Diego, each...
 
How Iron Gets Into The North Pacific: Is The Dust-storm Theory Overblown?
Berkeley, California - Mar 19, 2008 12:48 EST

Most oceanographers have assumed that, in the areas of the world's oceans known as High Nutrient, Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions, the iron needed to fertilize infrequent plankton blooms comes almost entirely from wind-blown dust. Phoebe Lam and James Bishop of...
 
Scientists: Sea Rabbits May Save The Great Barrier Reef; 'Came Out Of Nowhere'
Townsville, Australia - Mar 18, 2008 15:15 EST

While rabbits continue to ravage Australia's native landscapes, rabbit fish may help save large areas of the Great Barrier Reef from destruction. The reason, say scientists, is the same in both cases - both rabbits and rabbit fish are efficient...
 
Crab-like Robot Could Benefit Undersea Exploration; 'Nature Knows What Works Best'
Bath, U.K. - Mar 18, 2008 14:42 EST

Underwater exploration may become easier in the future thanks to a new prototype crab-like robot invented by a University of Bath postgraduate student. The robot can also move about on land and further development is planned for fully amphibious operation...
 
Researcher: Sharks Getting Smarter, 'Learning Our Techniques' For Tagging
Cardiff, U.K. - Mar 18, 2008 09:35 EST

Could sharks be catching on to human techniques for tagging them – and learning how to avoid them? That's the theory of Steve Kessel, an Earth and Ocean Sciences PhD student who has spent the past three years working at the...
 
Study: Zebrafish Use 'Molecular Circuit Breaker' To Regenerate Missing Fins; MicroRNA Eyed
Durham, North Carolina - Mar 17, 2008 14:51 EST

Biologists have discovered a molecular circuit breaker that controls a zebrafish's remarkable ability to regrow missing fins, according to a new study from Duke University Medical Center. Tiny wonders of the aquarium world, zebrafish can regenerate organs and tissues, including hearts,...
 
Book: Oceanic Sharks Worldwide At Serious Risk From High-seas Fishing, Rising Demand For Shark Products
New York, New York - Mar 17, 2008 14:27 EST

Oceanic shark populations worldwide are declining from destructive high-seas commercial fishing practices and a rising global demand for shark products (mainly fins and meat), with some shark populations severely depleted and only a few stable or recovering, according to a...
 
Monster 3.5-meter Basking Shark Caught Off Cyprus Coast; 'Feeds Off Plankton'
Latsi, Cyprus - Mar 13, 2008 13:43 EST

IT’S 3.5 metres long, 1.4 metres wide and weighs 350 kilograms. These are the measurements of the shark caught in Latsi in the Paphos district yesterday morning. The Mayor of Polis Chrysochous Angelos Georgiou said that, “the shark is a species which...
 
Biologists: Sand Dollar Larvae Use Cloning To 'Make Change,' Confound Predators
Seattle, Washington - Mar 13, 2008 13:29 EST

Nature is full of examples of creatures that try to look as big as possible in an effort to scare away potential predators. But to avoid being eaten alive the larvae of sand dollars appear to have a different strategy,...
 
Research: Alligators' Muscles Move Lungs Around For Sneaky Maneuvers In Water
Salt Lake City, Utah - Mar 13, 2008 12:59 EST

Without a ripple in the water, alligators dive, surface or roll sideways, even though they lack flippers or fins. University of Utah biologists discovered gators maneuver silently by using their diaphragm, pelvic, abdominal and rib muscles to shift their lungs...
 
Scientists: Streams Are Critical Nitrogen Filters, Aid In Preservation Of Oceanic Coastal Zones
Tempe, Arizona - Mar 12, 2008 13:38 EST

The plight of the world’s oceans is dire, according to recent studies, through insults from human-derived activities depopulating and damaging reefs, altering coastlines, and creating pollutants, such as nitrogen runoff from terrestrial watersheds. A study by 31 aquatic biologists involving...
 
Researcher: U.S. Rush To Produce Corn-based Ethanol Will Worsen 'Dead Zone' In Gulf Of Mexico
Vancouver, Canada - Mar 11, 2008 16:38 EST

The U.S. government’s rush to produce corn-based ethanol as a fuel alternative will worsen pollution in the Gulf of Mexico, increasing a “Dead Zone” that kills fish and aquatic life, according to University of British Columbia researcher Simon Donner. In the...
 
Study: Continental Drift, Sinking Ocean Basins Major Factor In Sea Level Changes
Sydney, Australia - Mar 11, 2008 07:52 EST

Sea levels were 550 feet (170 m) higher in the late Cretaceous period, about 80 million years ago, than today, shows a new reconstruction of historic ocean basins published in the journal Science. The authors say the work may help...
 
IFAW: Slaughter Of 275,000 Harp Seal Pups 'Completely Indefensible' In Face Of International Outcry And Dwindling Markets
Ottawa, Canada - Mar 10, 2008 14:45 EST

Canada's Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) has once again decided to ignore scientific advice, and the wishes of the majority of Canadians, by increasing the total allowable catch (TAC) for harp seals. "Quite frankly, I'm stunned." Said Sheryl Fink, a...
 
Shark Conspiracies: Fatal Shark Attack On Markus Groh Examined
San Diego, California - Mar 8, 2008 09:15 EST

The April, 2008, episode of Shark Conspiracies is now available for free download. Shark Conspiracies explores shark sightings and attacks in a new way, by exposing the cover-ups and misinformation sometimes generated from tourism and conservation interests. Shark Conspiracies claims...
 
Argh! NOAA Scientists Spot Rare White Killer Whale; Like 'Finding A Needle In A Haystack'
Seattle, Washington - Mar 6, 2008 16:53 EST

Scientists aboard the NOAA research vessel Oscar Dyson in the North Pacific have sighted a creature of great rarity and even myth: a white whale. Scientists aboard the NOAA research vessel Oscar Dyson in the North Pacific have sighted...
 
Group: Bahamas Shark Feeding Tours Endangering Others; Calls On Government To Prohibit Feeding
Miami, Florida - Mar 6, 2008 14:50 EST

Shark feeding tours to The Bahamas – like the one that ended last week in the tragic death of an Austrian diver – also pose a threat to island visitors not involved in these expeditions, said a spokesman for a...
 
Breath Of The Ocean Links Fish Feeding, Reefs, Climate; 'They're Not Smelling Food, But Other Cues'
Davis, California - Mar 6, 2008 14:09 EST

An ocean odor that affects global climate also gathers reef fish to feed as they "eavesdrop" on events that might lead them to food. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is given off by algae and phytoplankton, microscopic one-celled plants that float in the ocean....
 
Scientists: Changes In Ocean Conditions In Sargasso Sea Potential Cause For Decline In Eel Fishery
Silver Spring, Maryland - Mar 6, 2008 14:05 EST

American eels are fast disappearing from restaurant menus as stocks have declined sharply across the North Atlantic. While the reasons for the eel decline remain as mysterious as its long migrations, a recent study by a NOAA scientist and colleagues...
 
Massive 1,000-pound, 14-foot Hammerhead Shark Landed Off Florida Coast; 'I Can't Believe It'
Singer Island, Florida - Mar 6, 2008 10:05 EST

A massive 1,000-pound, 14-foot hammerhead shark was caught by a Florida fisherman Wednesday afternoon in shallow water. Fritz Van Der Grift was fishing off of Singer Island in Palm Beach County when he snagged the shark, which he says he never...
 
NOAA: Ocean 'Deserts' Are Expanding; 'Consistent' With Global Warming Or Sample 'Variation'
Silver Spring, Maryland - Mar 5, 2008 14:02 EST

The least biologically productive areas of the oceans are expanding much faster than predicted, according to a new study by researchers at NOAA and the University of Hawaii. This change in ocean biology, linked to the warming of sea surface...
 


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