Subscription Services: Subscribe | Change | Unsubscribe | RSS
Advertising Media Kit: Introduction | Stats/Demographics | Rates | Testimonial | Contact
Miscellaneous: Reference Desk | Sitemap

Breaking Newswire

Research: Rainfall And River Networks Prove Accurate Predictors Of Fish Biodiversity
Princeton, New Jersey - May 7, 2008 17:38 EST

Princeton researchers have invented a method for turning simple data about rainfall and river networks into accurate assessments of fish biodiversity, allowing better prediction of the effects of climate change and the ecological impact of man-made structures like dams. The mathematics...
 
Study: Stressed Seaweed Contributes To Cloudy Coastal Skies; 'large Quantities Of Iodide' Released
Manchester, U.K. - May 6, 2008 19:44 EST

Scientists at The University of Manchester have helped to identify that the presence of large amounts of seaweed in coastal areas can influence the climate. A new international study has found that large brown seaweeds, when under stress, release large quantities...
 
Researchers: Male Seahorses Are Nature's Mr. Mom; 'Origin Of Complex Traits' Eyed
College Station, Texas - May 5, 2008 17:52 EST

Although it is common for male fish to play the dominant parenting role, male pregnancy is a complex process unique to the fish family Syngnathidae, which includes pipefish, seahorses and sea dragons. Texas A&M University evolutionary biology researcher Adam Jones...
 
Researchers Develop Glow-in-the-dark Fish Powered By Artificial Sugar
Berkeley, California - May 4, 2008 18:43 EST

Using artificial sugar and some clever chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, researchers have made glow-in-the-dark fish whose internal light comes from the sugar coating on their cells. This novel method of fluorescently tagging the sugar chains, or carbohydrates, that coat cells...
 
Commercial Ban As 'Fish Failure' Declared For U.S. West Coast Salmon Fishery; 'A Tough Decision'
Washington, D.C. - May 2, 2008 17:59 EST

Secretary of Commerce Carlos M. Gutierrez today declared a commercial fishery failure for the West Coast salmon fishery due to historically low salmon returns. Also today, NOAA’s Fisheries Service issued regulations to close or severely limit recreational and commercial salmon...
 
Dive Trade Group Commends State Of Florida For Leadership Role In Creating Artificial Reefs
San Diego, California - May 2, 2008 17:22 EST

The Diving Equipment and Marketing Association congratulates the Florida Senate and House of Representatives for unanimously passing legislation which establishes a matching grant program titled Ships to Reefs. This bill, sponsored in the Senate by Mike Bennett, and in the House...
 
Scientists: Diatoms Discovered To Remove Phosphorus From Oceans; 'No One Knew They Were There'
Atlanta, Georgia - May 2, 2008 17:14 EST

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have discovered a new way that phosphorus is naturally removed from the oceans – its stored in diatoms. The discovery opens up a new realm of research into an element that’s used for...
 
Scientists: Computer Model Predicts Oxygen-depleted Zones In Tropical Oceans Are Expanding
San Diego, California - May 1, 2008 15:47 EST

An international team of physical oceanographers including a researcher from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego has discovered that oxygen-poor regions of tropical oceans are expanding as the oceans warm, limiting the areas in which predatory fishes and...
 
Researchers ID Potential Red Tide Killer; 'Chipmunks Taking Down An Elephant'
San Diego, California - May 1, 2008 14:08 EST

Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have identified a potential “red tide killer.” Red tides and related phenomena in which microscopic algae accumulate rapidly in dense concentrations have been on the rise in recent years, causing...
 
Global Warming Affects World's Largest Freshwater Lake; Siberia's Lake Baikal Previously Thought Immune
Arlington, Virginia - Apr 30, 2008 20:41 EST

Russian and American scientists have discovered that the rising temperature of the world's largest lake, located in frigid Siberia, shows that this region is responding strongly to global warming. Drawing on 60 years of long-term studies of Russia's Lake Baikal, Stephanie...
 
Scientists Discover New Ocean Current: North Pacific Gyre Oscillation
Atlanta, Georgia - Apr 30, 2008 17:45 EST

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have discovered a new climate pattern called the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation. This new pattern explains, for the first time, changes in the water that are important in helping commercial fishermen understand fluctuations...
 
Shark Attacks, Kills American Surfer Off Mexico's Pacific Coast; 15-inch Bite Wound To Thigh *Warning Graphic Photo*
Acupulco, Mexico - Apr 30, 2008 10:27 EST

A San Francisco man died after a shark attacked him while he was surfing off Mexico's southern Pacific coast, authorities in the southern state of Guerrero said Tuesday. The man was identified by Mexican authorities as Adrian Ruiz, 24, according to...
 
Gold Is Most Excellent: $12M In Treasure Divided Up From Florida's Famed Santa Margarita Wreck
Key West, Florida - Apr 30, 2008 09:53 EST

"Gold is most excellent," 15th century explorer Christopher Columbus penned in his sea journal, along with "of gold there is formed treasure…". Columbus also compared the taste of iguana to chicken. In some ways, life has not changed much in...
 
New Whale Detection Buoys To Help Ships Take The Right Way Through New England Waters; 'We Need Creative Solutions'
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Apr 29, 2008 17:21 EST

Researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the Bioacoustics Research Program (BRP) at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have teamed up with an international energy company and federal regulators to listen for and help protect endangered North Atlantic...
 
Probing Question: Why Do Whales Beach Themselves?
State College, Pennsylvania - Apr 26, 2008 17:18 EST

Whales are the largest marine mammals in the world — the smallest species weigh in at several tons. When whales beach themselves, they can die simply from the crushing weight of their own bodies or from overheating due to their...
 
Mexican National Sentenced For Smuggling Sea Turtle Products; Prison Time 'Should Serve As A Warning'
Washington, D.C. - Apr 25, 2008 18:24 EST

Carlos Leal Barragan, of Ciudad Guzman, Mexico, was sentenced today in U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado to serve 16 months in prison and three years supervised release in connection with his sale and smuggling of internationally protected sea...
 
USS Hoyt Vandenberg's Sinking Off Key West, Florida, Delayed; $1.6M In Unanticipated Cost Overruns
Key West, Florida - Apr 23, 2008 06:30 EST

Artificial reef project organizers coordinating the cleanup and sinking of a former United States Air Force missile tracking ship off Key West, Fla., announced a postponement of the scheduled scuttling date Tuesday. The 524-foot Hoyt S. Vandenberg will not sink May...
 
Shark Conspiracies: Recent Shark Attack News, Sightings, And Alleged Conspiracies Examined
San Diego, California - Apr 23, 2008 06:20 EST

The May 2008 episode of Shark Conspiracies is now available for free download. Shark Conspiracies explores shark sightings and attacks in a new way, by exposing the cover-ups and misinformation sometimes generated from tourism and conservation interests. Shark Conspiracies claims...
 
Can Certain Metals Repel Sharks From Fishing Gear? 'Our Results Were Very Promising'
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Apr 22, 2008 14:21 EST

Sharks in captivity avoid metals that react with seawater to produce an electric field, a behavior that may help fishery biologists develop a strategy to reduce the bycatch of sharks in longline gear. Shark bycatch is an increasing priority worldwide...
 
Expedition: The Antarctic Deep Sea Gets Colder; Largest Sea-ice Extent On Record
Berlin, Germany - Apr 21, 2008 14:19 EST

The Antarctic deep sea gets colder, which might stimulate the circulation of the oceanic water masses. This is the first result of the Polarstern expedition of the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in the Helmholtz Association that...
 
Scientists: Mysterious Striped Currents In Oceans Hiding In Plain Sight; 'My God, We've Never Seen These Before'
San Diego, California - Apr 17, 2008 10:29 EST

It’s amazing that nobody has spotted it before. Superimposed on every ocean on the planet there is a striped pattern of currents. Yet what causes them is a mystery. Between 1992 and 2003, Peter Niiler of the Scripps Institution of...
 
New Model Developed To Predict Ocean Conditions Where Corals Can Thrive
New York, New York - Apr 16, 2008 14:44 EST

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the International Institute for Geo-Information Science and Earth have developed a new scientific model that accurately maps where coral reefs are in the most trouble and identifies regions where reefs can be protected best....
 
Study: Fishing Disrupts 'Age Pyramid', Making Regulation Difficult; 'Systematic Alteration Of The Demographic Parameters'
San Diego, California - Apr 16, 2008 14:12 EST

Fishing activities can provoke volatile fluctuations in the populations they target, but it’s not often clear why. A new study published in the journal Nature by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and colleagues has identified...
 
New Underwater 'Imaging FlowCytobot' To Help Prevent Shellfish Poisoning Along Texas Gulf Coast
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Apr 11, 2008 15:15 EST

Through the use of an automated, underwater cell analyzer developed at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), researchers and coastal managers were recently able to detect a bloom of harmful marine algae in the Gulf of Mexico and prevent human...
 
Research: Unhealthy Chemical Cocktail The Result Of Sea Air Mixing With Urban/shipping Pollution
Calgary, Canada - Apr 9, 2008 16:51 EST

Air pollution in the world's busiest ports and shipping regions may be markedly worse than previously suspected, according to a new study showing that industrial and shipping pollution is exacerbated when it combines with sunshine and salty sea air. In...
 
Imported Aquacultured Reef Clams Found To Have Foreign Disease; 'It's Indigenous; You Can't Avoid It'
Gainsville, Florida - Apr 8, 2008 16:51 EST

Vividly colorful giant clams officially called tridacnids decorate many an upscale aquarium. But now experts say they boast an exterior beauty that masks an ugly truth: their potential for carrying foreign diseases. In findings that may impact the reef clam...
 
5 Months After Oil Spill In San Francisco Bay, Coast Guard Refusing FOIA Request On Cargo Ships In California
Sausalito, California - Apr 8, 2008 10:34 EST

More than five months after the devastating Cosco Busan accident, the US Coast Guard is still refusing to comply with an October 11, 2008 Freedom of Information Request by the marine conservation organization Seaflow asking for a list of vessels...
 
Scientists: Alligator Blood May Put The Bite On Antibiotic-resistant Infections
New Orleans, Louisiana - Apr 7, 2008 15:08 EST

Despite their reputation for deadly attacks on humans and pets, alligators are wiggling their way toward a new role as potential lifesavers in medicine, biochemists in Louisiana reported today at the 235th national meeting of the American Chemical Society. They...
 
Sydney Harbor's Contaminated Seaweeds A Deadly Diet For Sea Creatures
Sydney, Australia - Apr 7, 2008 14:24 EST

Contaminated seaweeds in Sydney Harbour could be threatening the small animals that feed on them, according to a new study revealing that the harbour's seaweeds have the world's highest levels of copper and lead contamination. Up to 75 percent of the...
 
Florida Topless Fishing Company Under Fire; 'Bikini Girl' Charters Drawing 'A Lot Of Calls'
Fort Myers, Florida - Apr 5, 2008 15:24 EST

Gil and Kathi Coombes have run charter boats for years, but it wasn't until January that their business really to took off. That's when they added "bikini girl" charters. "They will serve drinks and food and sandwiches and run out...
 
Freaky Fanged Fish Found In Utah Pond Stumps Experts; 'What Is This Thing?'
Brigham City, Utah - Apr 3, 2008 10:49 EST

Biologists are trying to identify a fish with large fangs that was found near a lake in Utah. So far, the identity of the strange fish has them stumped. Craig Schaugaard, Aquatic Manger for the Department of Wildlife Resources, said,...
 
Fish 'Eavesdropping' For Food Odors Connected To Global Climate Regulation
Wilmington, North Carolina - Apr 2, 2008 17:30 EST

Climate change may be predicted by fish who "eavesdrop" their way to healthy food sources using chemical cues given off by ocean organisms. This research, conducted by the University of North Carolina Wilmington assistant professor Sean Lema and collaborators, was...
 
Scientist: Anglerfish Found Off Indonesian Island May Represent New Vertebrate Family
Seattle, Washington - Apr 2, 2008 17:21 EST

A fish that would rather crawl into crevices than swim, and that may be able to see in the same way that humans do, could represent an entirely unknown family of fishes, says a University of Washington fish expert. The...
 
Researchers To Develop Ocean Sanctuary 'noise Budget' To Evaluate Potential Impact On Marine Mammals
Ithaca, New York - Apr 2, 2008 17:06 EST

Like sentinels at their posts, an array of buoys equipped with underwater microphones and other sensors will be on duty in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of Massachusetts for the next 30 months, recording sounds from...
 
Inaugural Peter Benchley Shark Conservation Award Given To Sawfish Advocate Matthew McDavitt
Princeton, New Jersey - Apr 2, 2008 04:54 EST

The Shark Research Institute created the Peter Benchley Shark Conservation Awards to honor the memory of the late Peter Benchley, and spotlight those who are working internationally to protect sharks as valuable ocean resources. The first of the 2008 Peter...
 
Research: Octopuses Flirt, Hold Hands, Guard Their Lovers; 'If You Watch Them, They Watch You Back'
Berkeley, California - Apr 1, 2008 05:42 EST

For decades, scientists have viewed octopuses as unromantic loners, with mating habits nearly devoid of complex behavior. But new research from the University of California, Berkeley, has found that at least one species of octopus engages in such sophisticated lovemaking...
 
Chilean Salmon Industry Responds To 'Boldly Erroneous' New York Times Article
Miami, Florida - Mar 31, 2008 14:23 EST

The following is being issued by Salmon of the Americans Inc. in response to the New York Times article, Salmon Virus Indicts Chile's Fishing Methods, by Alexei Barrionuevo: Considering the article written in the New York Times, our association must clarify...
 
Scientists Find That Squid Beak Is Both Hard And Soft, A Material That Engineers Want To Copy
Santa Barbara, California - Mar 27, 2008 12:24 EST

How did nature make the squid’s beak super hard and sharp –– allowing it, without harm to its soft body –– to capture its prey? The question has captivated those interested in creating new materials that mimic biological materials. The...
 
Maryland Angler Snags State Record 5-foot-long Blue Catfish; 'We Needed A Larger Net'
Fort Washington, Maryland - Mar 26, 2008 14:53 EST

Ron Lewis of Point of Rocks, Md. was fishing in the tidal Potomac River near Fort Washington on Sunday March 23 when he hooked and landed a new state record blue catfish. Ron who is an accomplished fisherman was targeting...
 
Researchers: Low Oxygen And Molybdenum In Ancient Oceans Delayed Evolution Of Life By 2 Billion Years
Riverside, California - Mar 26, 2008 13:51 EST

A deficiency of oxygen and the heavy metal molybdenum in the ancient deep ocean may have delayed the evolution of animal life on Earth by nearly two billion years, a study led by UC Riverside biogeochemists has found. The researchers...
 


Related Reading

bottom_left
bottom_right
Privacy Policy     © Copyright 2014 UnderwaterTimes.com. All rights reserved