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Breaking Newswire

Fijian Night Diver Killed By Shark Attack
Ba, Fiji - May 15, 2008 06:48 EST

Fijian man died after he was bitten by a shark whilst on a diving expedition. The 28-year-old man, Aisake Sadole, was part of a group of four who went night diving in Ba yesterday evening. According to police reports, the group realized...
 
Scientists: Mantis Shrimps See Beyond The Rainbow; 'A Completely New Concept Of Polarization Vision'
Frankfurt, Germany - May 14, 2008 17:51 EST

A Swiss marine biologist and an Australian quantum physicist have found that a species of shrimp from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, can see a world invisible to all other animals. Dr Sonja Kleinlogel and Professor Andrew White have shown...
 
Scientists Capture Deep Sea Methane Scavenger; Important Component In Global Carbon Cycle ID'd
Pasadena, California - May 14, 2008 17:17 EST

Scientists of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) in Leipzig and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena succeeded in capturing syntrophic (means "feeding together") microorganisms that are known to dramatically reduce the oceanic emission of methane into...
 
Scientists Aim To Use Robots Unlock Deep-sea 'Secrets' Of Earth's Crust
Stockton-on-Tees, U.K. - May 14, 2008 17:02 EST

Scientists from Durham University will use robots to explore the depths of the Atlantic Ocean to study the growth of underwater volcanoes that build the Earth’s crust. The Durham experts will lead an international team of 12 scientists aboard Britain’s Royal...
 
NOAA: Monitor Sanctuary In Good Health Overall, But Historic Shipwreck Still Faces Threats
Washington, D.C. - May 14, 2008 16:56 EST

he natural resources of the Monitor National Marine Sanctuary off the North Carolina coast are in good condition overall, but the wreck of the Civil War ironclad encompassed by the site is at risk from human activity and natural deterioration,...
 
Shark Conspiracies: Latest Shark Attack News and Conspiracies Examined
San Diego, California - May 14, 2008 15:12 EST

The May, 2008, episode of Shark Conspiracies is now available for free download. Shark Conspiracies explores shark sightings and attacks in a new way, by exposing the cover-ups and misinformation sometimes generated from tourism and conservation interests. Shark Conspiracies claims...
 
NOAA: Coastal Waters Decline In Contaminants Over 20-Year Period; DDT, PCBs 'Show Significant Decreasing Trends'
Washington, D.C. - May 14, 2008 09:28 EST

NOAA scientists today released a 20-year study showing that environmental laws enacted in the 1970s are having a positive effect on reducing overall contaminant levels in coastal waters of the U.S. However, the report points to continuing concerns with...
 
Divers Find Oldest Known Marble Bust Of Caesar; Rhone River Discovery May Date To 46 B.C.
Paris, France - May 14, 2008 08:35 EST

Divers trained in archaeology discovered a marble bust of an aging Caesar in the Rhone River that France's Culture Ministry said Tuesday could be the oldest known. The life-sized bust showing the Roman ruler with wrinkles and hollows in his face...
 
Researcher: Drying Anchor Lines Can Help Contain Spread Of Spiny Water Fleas
Kingston, Canada - May 13, 2008 18:29 EST

Reducing the spread of some invasive species into our lakes could be as simple as asking boaters and fishers to dry out their equipment, says Queen’s Biology professor Shelley Arnott. When anchor rope, fishing line and the boats themselves are thoroughly...
 
Research: Fish Study Leads Way To Understanding When To 'Follow The Leader'
Leicester, U.K. - May 13, 2008 18:09 EST

For animals that live in social groups, and that includes humans, blindly following a leader could place them in danger. To avoid this, animals have developed simple but effective behaviour to follow where at least a few of them dare...
 
Research: Fecal Bacterial Survive Better In Sand Than Seawater
Washington, D.C. - May 13, 2008 17:13 EST

Traditionally, the cleanliness of a beach is monitored by sampling the bathing water a few meters from shore. But since sand is an effective filter, it follows that fecal bacteria (those from sewage) may be concentrated in the sand as...
 
Research: Fish Diet To Avoid Fights With Slightly Larger Rivals; Males Prefer 'Fatter' Females
Townsville, Australia - May 12, 2008 16:25 EST

People diet to look more attractive. Fish diet to avoid being beaten up, thrown out of their social group - and getting eaten as a result. That is the fascinating conclusion of the latest research into fish behavior by researchers...
 
Chalk One Up For Coccolithophores; Algae Builds Thicker Walls To Fend Off Ocean Acidification
Seattle, Washington - May 8, 2008 15:08 EST

Scientists have feared that gradual acidification of the world's oceans would wreak havoc with organisms that build protective outer shells. But a new finding shows at least three species of coccolithophores -- single-celled algae that are major players in the...
 
Shake Up At Scuba Diving Magazine As Jason White Out, Keith Phillips In As Editor, Publisher
Miami, Florida - May 8, 2008 10:38 EST

F+W Publications, parent company of Scuba Diving magazine, has announced that Keith Phillips has been promoted to Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of the magazine and scubadiving.com. Current publisher Jason White is leaving the magazine "to pursue other interests". Phillips has been...
 
Research: Rainfall And River Networks Prove Accurate Predictors Of Fish Biodiversity
Princeton, New Jersey - May 7, 2008 17:38 EST

Princeton researchers have invented a method for turning simple data about rainfall and river networks into accurate assessments of fish biodiversity, allowing better prediction of the effects of climate change and the ecological impact of man-made structures like dams. The mathematics...
 
Study: Stressed Seaweed Contributes To Cloudy Coastal Skies; 'large Quantities Of Iodide' Released
Manchester, U.K. - May 6, 2008 19:44 EST

Scientists at The University of Manchester have helped to identify that the presence of large amounts of seaweed in coastal areas can influence the climate. A new international study has found that large brown seaweeds, when under stress, release large quantities...
 
Researchers: Male Seahorses Are Nature's Mr. Mom; 'Origin Of Complex Traits' Eyed
College Station, Texas - May 5, 2008 17:52 EST

Although it is common for male fish to play the dominant parenting role, male pregnancy is a complex process unique to the fish family Syngnathidae, which includes pipefish, seahorses and sea dragons. Texas A&M University evolutionary biology researcher Adam Jones...
 
Researchers Develop Glow-in-the-dark Fish Powered By Artificial Sugar
Berkeley, California - May 4, 2008 18:43 EST

Using artificial sugar and some clever chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, researchers have made glow-in-the-dark fish whose internal light comes from the sugar coating on their cells. This novel method of fluorescently tagging the sugar chains, or carbohydrates, that coat cells...
 
Commercial Ban As 'Fish Failure' Declared For U.S. West Coast Salmon Fishery; 'A Tough Decision'
Washington, D.C. - May 2, 2008 17:59 EST

Secretary of Commerce Carlos M. Gutierrez today declared a commercial fishery failure for the West Coast salmon fishery due to historically low salmon returns. Also today, NOAA’s Fisheries Service issued regulations to close or severely limit recreational and commercial salmon...
 
Dive Trade Group Commends State Of Florida For Leadership Role In Creating Artificial Reefs
San Diego, California - May 2, 2008 17:22 EST

The Diving Equipment and Marketing Association congratulates the Florida Senate and House of Representatives for unanimously passing legislation which establishes a matching grant program titled Ships to Reefs. This bill, sponsored in the Senate by Mike Bennett, and in the House...
 
Scientists: Diatoms Discovered To Remove Phosphorus From Oceans; 'No One Knew They Were There'
Atlanta, Georgia - May 2, 2008 17:14 EST

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have discovered a new way that phosphorus is naturally removed from the oceans – its stored in diatoms. The discovery opens up a new realm of research into an element that’s used for...
 
Scientists: Computer Model Predicts Oxygen-depleted Zones In Tropical Oceans Are Expanding
San Diego, California - May 1, 2008 15:47 EST

An international team of physical oceanographers including a researcher from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego has discovered that oxygen-poor regions of tropical oceans are expanding as the oceans warm, limiting the areas in which predatory fishes and...
 
Researchers ID Potential Red Tide Killer; 'Chipmunks Taking Down An Elephant'
San Diego, California - May 1, 2008 14:08 EST

Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have identified a potential “red tide killer.” Red tides and related phenomena in which microscopic algae accumulate rapidly in dense concentrations have been on the rise in recent years, causing...
 
Global Warming Affects World's Largest Freshwater Lake; Siberia's Lake Baikal Previously Thought Immune
Arlington, Virginia - Apr 30, 2008 20:41 EST

Russian and American scientists have discovered that the rising temperature of the world's largest lake, located in frigid Siberia, shows that this region is responding strongly to global warming. Drawing on 60 years of long-term studies of Russia's Lake Baikal, Stephanie...
 
Scientists Discover New Ocean Current: North Pacific Gyre Oscillation
Atlanta, Georgia - Apr 30, 2008 17:45 EST

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have discovered a new climate pattern called the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation. This new pattern explains, for the first time, changes in the water that are important in helping commercial fishermen understand fluctuations...
 
Shark Attacks, Kills American Surfer Off Mexico's Pacific Coast; 15-inch Bite Wound To Thigh *Warning Graphic Photo*
Acupulco, Mexico - Apr 30, 2008 10:27 EST

A San Francisco man died after a shark attacked him while he was surfing off Mexico's southern Pacific coast, authorities in the southern state of Guerrero said Tuesday. The man was identified by Mexican authorities as Adrian Ruiz, 24, according to...
 
Gold Is Most Excellent: $12M In Treasure Divided Up From Florida's Famed Santa Margarita Wreck
Key West, Florida - Apr 30, 2008 09:53 EST

"Gold is most excellent," 15th century explorer Christopher Columbus penned in his sea journal, along with "of gold there is formed treasure…". Columbus also compared the taste of iguana to chicken. In some ways, life has not changed much in...
 
New Whale Detection Buoys To Help Ships Take The Right Way Through New England Waters; 'We Need Creative Solutions'
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Apr 29, 2008 17:21 EST

Researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the Bioacoustics Research Program (BRP) at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have teamed up with an international energy company and federal regulators to listen for and help protect endangered North Atlantic...
 
Probing Question: Why Do Whales Beach Themselves?
State College, Pennsylvania - Apr 26, 2008 17:18 EST

Whales are the largest marine mammals in the world — the smallest species weigh in at several tons. When whales beach themselves, they can die simply from the crushing weight of their own bodies or from overheating due to their...
 
Mexican National Sentenced For Smuggling Sea Turtle Products; Prison Time 'Should Serve As A Warning'
Washington, D.C. - Apr 25, 2008 18:24 EST

Carlos Leal Barragan, of Ciudad Guzman, Mexico, was sentenced today in U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado to serve 16 months in prison and three years supervised release in connection with his sale and smuggling of internationally protected sea...
 
USS Hoyt Vandenberg's Sinking Off Key West, Florida, Delayed; $1.6M In Unanticipated Cost Overruns
Key West, Florida - Apr 23, 2008 06:30 EST

Artificial reef project organizers coordinating the cleanup and sinking of a former United States Air Force missile tracking ship off Key West, Fla., announced a postponement of the scheduled scuttling date Tuesday. The 524-foot Hoyt S. Vandenberg will not sink May...
 
Shark Conspiracies: Recent Shark Attack News, Sightings, And Alleged Conspiracies Examined
San Diego, California - Apr 23, 2008 06:20 EST

The May 2008 episode of Shark Conspiracies is now available for free download. Shark Conspiracies explores shark sightings and attacks in a new way, by exposing the cover-ups and misinformation sometimes generated from tourism and conservation interests. Shark Conspiracies claims...
 
Can Certain Metals Repel Sharks From Fishing Gear? 'Our Results Were Very Promising'
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Apr 22, 2008 14:21 EST

Sharks in captivity avoid metals that react with seawater to produce an electric field, a behavior that may help fishery biologists develop a strategy to reduce the bycatch of sharks in longline gear. Shark bycatch is an increasing priority worldwide...
 
Expedition: The Antarctic Deep Sea Gets Colder; Largest Sea-ice Extent On Record
Berlin, Germany - Apr 21, 2008 14:19 EST

The Antarctic deep sea gets colder, which might stimulate the circulation of the oceanic water masses. This is the first result of the Polarstern expedition of the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in the Helmholtz Association that...
 
Scientists: Mysterious Striped Currents In Oceans Hiding In Plain Sight; 'My God, We've Never Seen These Before'
San Diego, California - Apr 17, 2008 10:29 EST

It’s amazing that nobody has spotted it before. Superimposed on every ocean on the planet there is a striped pattern of currents. Yet what causes them is a mystery. Between 1992 and 2003, Peter Niiler of the Scripps Institution of...
 
New Model Developed To Predict Ocean Conditions Where Corals Can Thrive
New York, New York - Apr 16, 2008 14:44 EST

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the International Institute for Geo-Information Science and Earth have developed a new scientific model that accurately maps where coral reefs are in the most trouble and identifies regions where reefs can be protected best....
 
Study: Fishing Disrupts 'Age Pyramid', Making Regulation Difficult; 'Systematic Alteration Of The Demographic Parameters'
San Diego, California - Apr 16, 2008 14:12 EST

Fishing activities can provoke volatile fluctuations in the populations they target, but it’s not often clear why. A new study published in the journal Nature by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and colleagues has identified...
 
New Underwater 'Imaging FlowCytobot' To Help Prevent Shellfish Poisoning Along Texas Gulf Coast
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Apr 11, 2008 15:15 EST

Through the use of an automated, underwater cell analyzer developed at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), researchers and coastal managers were recently able to detect a bloom of harmful marine algae in the Gulf of Mexico and prevent human...
 
Research: Unhealthy Chemical Cocktail The Result Of Sea Air Mixing With Urban/shipping Pollution
Calgary, Canada - Apr 9, 2008 16:51 EST

Air pollution in the world's busiest ports and shipping regions may be markedly worse than previously suspected, according to a new study showing that industrial and shipping pollution is exacerbated when it combines with sunshine and salty sea air. In...
 
Imported Aquacultured Reef Clams Found To Have Foreign Disease; 'It's Indigenous; You Can't Avoid It'
Gainsville, Florida - Apr 8, 2008 16:51 EST

Vividly colorful giant clams officially called tridacnids decorate many an upscale aquarium. But now experts say they boast an exterior beauty that masks an ugly truth: their potential for carrying foreign diseases. In findings that may impact the reef clam...
 


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