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Study: Beaked Whales' Tusks Evolved Through Sexual Selection Process; 'Most Bizarre Whales In The Ocean'
Corvallis, Oregon - Dec 12, 2008 18:40 EST

For years, scientists have wondered why only males of the rarely seen family of beaked whales have “tusks,” since they are squid-eaters and in many of the species, these elaborately modified teeth seem to actually interfere with feeding. A newly published...
 
U.S. Coast Guard Responds To Healy Tragedy, Opens Regional Dive Facilities; 'We Will Not Accept Preventable Loss Or Injury'
San Diego, California - Dec 11, 2008 16:22 EST

On Aug. 17, 2006, two active duty military members' lives were cut short during a cold water familiarization diving accident in the Arctic aboard U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy. The Coast Guard initiated an immediate administrative and safety investigation into...
 
Tiny Knights In Shining Armor – Bacteria Detoxify Deadly Seawater; 'Very Positive As Well As A Worrying'
Bremen, Germany - Dec 11, 2008 15:59 EST

Hydrogen sulphide is well known for its characteristic smell of rotten eggs. But hydrogen sulphide is not only smelly, it is also highly toxic. Humans can die within minutes when exposed to high concentrations of hydrogen sulphide. This foul-smelling gas...
 
First-ever Socioeconomic Study On Coral Reefs Points To Challenges Of Coastal Resource Management
Washington, D.C> - Dec 10, 2008 23:13 EST

A first of its kind study, "Socioeconomic Conditions Along the World's Tropical Coasts: 2008," reports on the social and economic ramifications of healthy coral reefs in 27 tropical nations and points to the inability of coastal managers to effectively implement...
 
Report: 20% Of World's Corals Already Dead; Climate Change Tipping Point 'Less Than A Decade Away'
Pozan, Poland - Dec 10, 2008 13:57 EST

Increasing pressures from climate change will reach a tipping point in less than a decade triggering a significant decline in the health of the planet's coral reef ecosystems according to the findings in an international report issued today. Released by the...
 
Acoustic Phenomena Explain Why Boats And Animals Collide; 'Slow Speeds Actually Exacerbate The Risks'
Miami, Florida - Dec 9, 2008 21:45 EST

Researchers at Florida Atlantic University have laid the groundwork for a sensory explanation for why manatees and other animals are hit repeatedly by boats. Last year, 73 manatees were killed by boats in Florida’s bays and inland waterways. Marine authorities...
 
Dune And Dirty: Hurricane Teaches Lessons Through Ecosystem Research; 'sediment Accumulation Didn't Happen'
Galveston, Texas - Dec 9, 2008 19:15 EST

Dr. Rusty Feagin was managing several ecosystem research projects on Galveston Island when the 2008 hurricane season began. Then he got an unexpected visit from a research assistant named Ike. "Ike reconfirmed the basic idea I've had for several years," said Feagin,...
 
NOAA: Ships Must Slow Down To Protect North Atlantic Right Whales
Washington, D.C. - Dec 8, 2008 21:11 EST

Ships in southeastern Atlantic and mid-Atlantic U.S. waters must slow down to protect endangered right whales starting this week. A landmark regulation going into effect on Dec. 9 will require ships 65 feet or longer to travel at 10 knots...
 
Study: Baby Fish In Polluted San Francisco Estuary Waters Are Stunted And Deformed
Davis, California - Dec 8, 2008 20:47 EST

Striped bass in the San Francisco Estuary are contaminated before birth with a toxic mix of pesticides, industrial chemicals and flame retardants that their mothers acquire from estuary waters and food sources and pass on to their eggs, say UC...
 
Isopora Or Isn't It? Mistaken Identity Leads Researchers To Two New Extinct Species Of Coral
Miami, Florida - Dec 8, 2008 20:31 EST

What began as an homage to achievement in the field of coral reef geology has evolved into the discovery of an unexpected link between corals of the Pacific and Atlantic. Dr. Ann F. Budd from the University of Iowa and...
 
Scripps Oceanography To Build Marine Lab; 'We Are Grateful For This Vote Of Confidence'
San Diego, California - Dec 8, 2008 20:26 EST

Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego has been awarded $12 million by the U.S. Department of Commerce (DoC)/National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to construct a new laboratory building on the Scripps campus for research on marine...
 
NOAA Charges Florida Dive Charter Businesses With Spearfishing Without Federal Permits
Washington, D.C. - Dec 4, 2008 17:55 EST

NOAA has charged two dive business owners in Pensacola, Fla., with illegally operating spearfishing charters without the appropriate permits in federal waters off the Florida panhandle. NOAA and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission launched an investigation in summer 2007...
 
Florida Bonefish Census Reveals Population Holding Steady; 'a Great Indicator Of Ecological Change'
Virginia Key, Florida - Dec 4, 2008 17:45 EST

If you're looking for bonefish from Miami down to the Marquesas Islands, you have about 321,000 to choose from, and that is down slightly from the average of previous censuses—mostly due to increased participation among those who are counting, researchers...
 
No Place Like Home: New Theory For How Salmon, Sea Turtles Find Their Birthplace; 'Magnetic Address'
Chapel Hill, North Carolina - Dec 3, 2008 19:32 EST

How marine animals find their way back to their birthplace to reproduce after migrating across thousands of miles of open ocean has mystified scientists for more than a century. But marine biologists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel...
 
Expeditions Reveal Gulf Of California's Deep Sea Secrets, As Well As Human Imprints; 'We Are Excited'
San Diego, California - Dec 3, 2008 18:50 EST

Scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego returning from research expeditions in Mexico have captured unprecedented details of vibrant sea life and ecosystems in the Gulf of California, including documentations of new species and marine animals previously...
 
Model Developed To Predict Hot Spots For Mercury Levels In Fish
Raleigh, North Carolina - Dec 1, 2008 21:45 EST

Mercury levels in fish are prompting widespread consumption advisories and uncertainty among consumers over which species are safe to eat. Now researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a model that will help scientists and regulators around the country...
 
Study Reveals Humpback Whales’ Dining Habits – And Costs; 'Enormous Energy Costs'
British Columbia, Canada - Nov 27, 2008 18:43 EST

As most American families sit down to Thanksgiving dinner, a University of British Columbia researcher is revealing how one of the largest animals on earth feasts on the smallest of prey – and at what cost. Some large marine mammals are...
 
Scientists: Keep Big Fish In Their Small Ponds -- Or In The Ocean
Toronto, Canada - Nov 27, 2008 18:25 EST

Scientists at the University of Toronto analysed Canadian fisheries data to determine the effect of the "keep the large ones" policy that is typical of fisheries. What they found is that the effect of this policy is an unsustainable fishery. In...
 
Scientists: Speed Matters For Ice-shelf Breaking; 'there Is So Much Variability'
State College, Pennsylvania - Nov 27, 2008 16:16 EST

It won't help the Titanic, but a newly derived, simple law may help scientists improve their climate models and glaciologists predict where icebergs will calve off from their parent ice sheets, according to a team of Penn State researchers. "To predict...
 
Study: Shrimp Trawling May Boost Mercury In Red Snapper; 'An Issue Worth Watching'
Fort Worth, Texas - Nov 26, 2008 16:53 EST

Fishery experts have known for years that shrimp trawling operations in the Gulf of Mexico are contributing to sharp declines in the ranks of Red Snapper, one of the most delicious and popular marine fish on the seafood menu. While...
 
NOAA: U.S. Pushes For Strong Measures To Protect Bluefin Tuna; 'Excessive Fishing Levels' Putting Species At Risk
Washington, D.C. - Nov 25, 2008 20:00 EST

Despite a strong U.S. proposal to conserve bluefin tuna in the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean, the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas failed today to heed scientific advice and adopt measures that would end overfishing and put this...
 
New Sand Tiger Sharks Debut At Georgia Aquarium; 'Scary-looking, Yet Docile Species'
Atlanta, Georgia - Nov 25, 2008 17:57 EST

Georgia Aquarium announced today that new sand tiger sharks have been added into the Ocean Voyager gallery, built by The Home Depot. The sharks were introduced into the 6.3 million gallon habitat alongside the whale sharks, manta ray and many other...
 
Study: Light Pollution Offers New Global Measure Of Coral Reef Health; 'Correlates With Human Impact'
Los Angeles, California - Nov 25, 2008 17:31 EST

We've all seen the satellite images of Earth at night--the bright blobs and shining webs that tell the story of humanity's endless sprawl. These pictures are no longer just symbols of human impact, however, but can be used to objectively measure...
 
NOAA Mission Discovers Historic Shipwreck Off Turks And Caicos Islands; 'The Story Was Lost To History'
Washinton, D.C. - Nov 25, 2008 17:20 EST

Maritime archaeologists today announced they have recently identified the wreck of the historic slave ship Trouvadore off the coast of East Caicos in the Turks and Caicos Islands. NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and Research significantly funded several years of...
 
Study: Dolphin Population Stunted By Fishing; Beyond 'Bycatch', Reproduction Seen To Decline
San Diego, California - Nov 24, 2008 18:45 EST

Despite broad “dolphin safe” practices, fishing activities have continued to restrict the growth of at least one Pacific Ocean dolphin population, a new report led by a researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego has concluded. Populations of...
 
'Gray's Paradox' Cracked: Researchers Discover Secret Of Speedy Dolphins
Troy, New York - Nov 24, 2008 18:34 EST

There was something peculiar about dolphins that stumped prolific British zoologist Sir James Gray in 1936. He had observed the sea mammals swimming at a swift rate of more than 20 miles per hour, but his studies had concluded that...
 
Smithsonian Puts Tropical Eastern-Pacific Shore Fishes Online
Washington, D.C. - Nov 24, 2008 18:12 EST

A new bilingual online information system created by D. Ross Robertson, staff scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, and Coeus Knowledge Systems makes it possible for conservationists, sport fishers, tourists, researchers, students and resource managers to identify and generate...
 
Study: Ocean Growing More Acidic; '10 Time Faster' Than Models Predicted
Chicago, Illinois - Nov 24, 2008 17:55 EST

University of Chicago scientists have documented that the ocean is growing more acidic faster than previously thought. In addition, they have found that the increasing acidity correlates with increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, according to a paper published online...
 
U.S. Military Technology Protects Critically Endangered Goliath Grouper; 'World's First Use Of An Acoustic Underwater Camera'
Fort Pierce, Florida - Nov 23, 2008 18:06 EST

The Ocean Research & Conservation Association (ORCA) and its collaborators announced today the world's first use of an acoustic underwater camera to survey juveniles of goliath grouper in mangrove habitats. Goliath grouper, Epinephelus itajara, currently is listed as critically endangered by...
 
'Fish Technology' Draws Renewable Energy From Slow Water Currents; 'Vortex Induced Vibrations'
Anne Arbor, Michigan - Nov 22, 2008 16:33 EST

Slow-moving ocean and river currents could be a new, reliable and affordable alternative energy source. A University of Michigan engineer has made a machine that works like a fish to turn potentially destructive vibrations in fluid flows into clean, renewable...
 
Study: First Ever Evidence Of Natural Disease Resistance In Tropical Corals
Boston, Massachusetts - Nov 21, 2008 18:33 EST

In recent years, tropical coral reefs have become drastically altered by disease epidemics. In a new study published by PLoS ONE, lead author Steven V. Vollmer, assistant professor of biology at the Marine Science Center at Northeastern University, finds...
 
After 45 Years, NOAA Fisheries Research Ship Albatross IV Is Retired; 'The Grand Old Lady Of The Fleet'
Washington, D.C. - Nov 20, 2008 15:53 EST

The NOAA research ship Albatross IV was decommissioned today, ending its distinguished 45-year career in service to the nation. The vessel sailed over 655,000 miles on 453 research cruises, primarily fisheries surveys off the northeastern coast of the United States....
 
Researchers: Sea Level Rise Will Alter Chesapeake Bay's Salinity
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - Nov 20, 2008 15:28 EST

While global-warming-induced coastal flooding moves populations inland, the changes in sea level will affect the salinity of estuaries, which influences aquatic life, fishing and recreation. Researchers from Penn State and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are studying...
 
Researchers Use Fluorescence To Develop Fast, Simple Method For Detecting Mercury In Fish And Dental Fillings
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - Nov 18, 2008 22:07 EST

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have developed a simple and quick method for detecting mercury in fish and dental samples, two substances at the center of public concern about mercury contamination. The technique involves a fluorescent substance that glows...
 
NOAA: Restrictions Recommended As Three Common Pesticides Found To Harm Salmon
Washington, D.C. - Nov 18, 2008 21:43 EST

NOAA today issued a biological opinion to the Environmental Protection Agency that found three chemicals used in pesticides – diazonin, malathion, and chlorpyrifos - are likely to jeopardize 27 populations of salmon on the West Coast that are listed as...
 
New Deep-sea Observatory Goes Live Off California Coast; MARS 'no Easy Task'
Moss Landing, California - Nov 18, 2008 21:34 EST

Off the coast of Central California, in the inky darkness of the deep sea, a bright orange metal pyramid about the size of two compact cars sits quietly on the seafloor. Nestled within the metal pyramid is the heart of...
 
Tuna Commission Set To Decide The Future Of Mediterranean Bluefin As Populations 'Poised For Collapse'
Marrakech, Morocco - Nov 18, 2008 21:25 EST

The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) will meet from November 17- 24 in Marrakech, Morocco to make decisions on measures to save Mediterranean bluefin tuna from collapse. ICCAT meets this year with mounting evidence of the...
 
Mysterious Microbe May Play Important Role In Ocean Ecology; 'So Many Missing Parts'
Santa Cruz, California - Nov 15, 2008 17:20 EST

An unusual microorganism discovered in the open ocean may force scientists to rethink their understanding of how carbon and nitrogen cycle through ocean ecosystems. A research team led by Jonathan Zehr, professor of ocean sciences at the University of California,...
 
NOAA Charges 'Unscrupulous' Charter Operators With Illegal Fishing For Striped Bass
New York, New York - Nov 14, 2008 18:00 EST

A joint undercover operation by NOAA’s Fisheries Service Office of Law Enforcement and New York and New Jersey enforcement agents has uncovered evidence of alleged illegal fishing by two charter operators. The operators, Steven N. Forsberg and Viking Starship Inc....
 
Fishermen Block Costa Rican Port To Protest New Law Banning Shark Finning
San Jose, Costa Rica - Nov 14, 2008 09:52 EST

A cruise ship carrying 1,300 passengers that was scheduled to arrive at Costa Rica's Pacific port of Puntarenas had to be diverted to Panama because of a protest by fishermen that left three people arrested and caused an estimated $250,000...
 


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