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Study: Mercury In Coastal Fog Linked To Upwelling Of Deep Ocean Water; 'Parts-Per-Trillion Levels'
Santa Cruz, California - Dec 4, 2012 20:33 EST

An ongoing investigation of elevated mercury levels in coastal fog in California suggests that upwelling of deep ocean water along the coast brings mercury to the surface, where it enters the atmosphere and is absorbed by fog. Peter Weiss-Penzias, an environmental...
 
NOAA Proposes Listing 66 Reef-Building Coral Species Under The Endangered Species Act
Washington, D.C. - Nov 30, 2012 20:26 EST

In compliance with a federal court ordered deadline, and consistent with existing international protections, NOAA Fisheries announced today that it is proposing Endangered Species Act (ESA) listings for 66 coral species, including 59 in the Pacific and seven in the...
 
Study: Dispersants Used During Gulf Of Mexico Clean-Up Made Spill 52-Times More Toxic
Atlanta, Georgia - Nov 30, 2012 19:27 EST

If the 4.9 million barrels of oil that spilled into the Gulf of Mexico during the 2010 Deep Water Horizon spill was a ecological disaster, the two million gallons of dispersant used to clean it up apparently made it even...
 
Scientists: Projected Sea-Level Rise May Be Underestimated; IPCC 'Far From Being Alarmist'
Potsdam, Germany - Nov 28, 2012 20:44 EST

That sea level is rising faster than expected could mean that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) sea-level rise projections for the future may be biased low as well, their results suggest. Sea-level rise potentially affects millions of people all...
 
Scientists: Ancient Microbes Found In Salty, Ice-Sealed Antarctic Lake; 'New Boundary Conditions On The Limits For Life'
Chicago, Illinois - Nov 27, 2012 19:11 EST

Shedding light on the limits of life in extreme environments, scientists have discovered abundant and diverse metabolically active bacteria in the brine of an Antarctic lake sealed under more than 65 feet of ice. The finding, described in this week's issue...
 
Researchers Pitch Idea Of 'Wave Cloaking' To Shield Floating Objects
San Diego, California - Nov 26, 2012 18:07 EST

A new approach to invisibility cloaking may one day be used at sea to shield floating objects – such as oil rigs and ships – from rough waves. Unlike most other cloaking techniques that rely on transformation optics, this one...
 
Researchers: Eating Right Key To Survival Of Whales And Dolphins
Vancouver, British Columbia - Nov 21, 2012 17:27 EST

In the marine world, high-energy prey make for high-energy predators. And to survive, such marine predators need to sustain the right kind of high-energy diet. Not just any prey will do, suggests a new study by researchers from the University...
 
Researchers Studying 'Fingerprint' Left On Seafloor By Hurricane Sandy
Newark, Delaware - Nov 19, 2012 21:30 EST

Beneath the 20-foot waves that crested off Delaware's coast during Hurricane Sandy, thrashing waters reshaped the floor of the ocean, churning up fine sand and digging deep ripples into the seabed. Fish, crustaceans and other marine life were blasted with...
 
Metabolomics: Aquarium Researchers Identify New Biomarker For Whale Shark Health
Atlanta, Georgia - Nov 19, 2012 21:14 EST

New research from Georgia Aquarium and Georgia Institute of Technology provides evidence that a suite of techniques called "metabolomics" can be used to determine the health status of whale sharks (Rhincodon typus), the world's largest fish species. The study, led...
 
Blubbery Buddies And Toothy Terrors: Researcher Says Media Influences Public's Perception Of Sea Life
Christchurch, New Zealand's - Nov 19, 2012 20:49 EST

Many people will not have had any real-life contact with marine creatures like dolphins, whales, and sharks, other than via the media, despite the increase in marine-fauna tourism, a University of Canterbury researcher said. Because there was less chance for real-life...
 
Scientists: Hard To Fish Areas Of The Seabed May Act As Refuges For Endangered Skate
Bangor, Maine - Nov 16, 2012 19:08 EST

Marine scientists working in the Celtic Sea have discovered a natural refuge for the critically endangered flapper skate. Many elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates) are highly vulnerable to over-fishing, but a new paper in the open access journal PLOS ONE shows...
 
Researchers: At Least One-Third Of Marine Species Remain Undescribed; No 'Formal Way To Register Species'
New York, New York - Nov 15, 2012 16:13 EST

At least one-third of the species that inhabit the world's oceans may remain completely unknown to science. That's despite the fact that more species have been described in the last decade than in any previous one, according to a report...
 
Researchers: Changing Climate, Not Tourism, Seems To Be Driving Decline In Chinstrap-Penguin Populations; 'It's Warmed By 3 Degrees Celsius'
Stony Brook, New York - Nov 14, 2012 20:31 EST

The breeding population of chinstrap penguins has declined significantly as temperatures have rapidly warmed on the Antarctic Peninsula, according to researchers funded in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The study indicates that changing climatic conditions, rather than the impact...
 
Researchers: Marine Reserve 'Naïve Fish' Are Easy Targets For Spear Fishers; 'Literally More Catchable'
Townsville, Queensland - Nov 13, 2012 20:14 EST

Big fish that have grown up in marine reserves don't seem to know enough to avoid fishers armed with spear guns waiting outside the reserve. The latest research by an Australian team working in the Philippines into the effects of...
 
Despite Their Thick Skins, Alligators And Crocodiles Are Surprisingly Touchy
Nashville, Tennessee - Nov 12, 2012 20:18 EST

Crocodiles and alligators are notorious for their thick skin and well-armored bodies. So it comes as something of a surprise to learn that their sense of touch is one of the most acute in the animal kingdom. The crocodilian sense of...
 
Researchers: Corals Attacked By Toxic Seaweed Use Chemical 911 Signals To Summon Help
Atlanta, Georgia - Nov 8, 2012 16:26 EST

Corals under attack by toxic seaweed do what anyone might do when threatened – they call for help. A study reported this week in the journal Science shows that threatened corals send signals to fish "bodyguards" that quickly respond to...
 
Sitting Still Or Going Hunting: Which Works Better? 'Swimming Costs Matter'
Cambridge, Massachusetts - Nov 5, 2012 20:39 EST

For the kinds of animals that are most familiar to us — ones that are big enough to see — it's a no-brainer: Is it better to sit around and wait for food to come to you, or to move...
 
World's Rarest Whale Seen For First Time, Washed Up Dead On Kiwi Beach; 'We Know Almost Nothing About Such A Large Mammal'
Auckland, New Zealand - Nov 5, 2012 20:34 EST

A whale that is almost unknown to science has been seen for the first time after two individuals—a mother and her male calf—were stranded and died on a New Zealand beach. A report in the November 6th issue of Current...
 
Real Life Horror Film Too Scary For TV: Group Launches Film That Exposes The Gory Truth Of Shark Finning
London, England - Nov 1, 2012 14:07 EST

Shark conservation charity, Bite-Back chose yesterday, Halloween, to launch a shocking real life horror film that exposes the gory truth about the shark fishing industry and the controversial practice of 'finning' live sharks at sea. In 24 hours the film...
 
Research: Controlling Invasive Lionfish May Best Be Done In Targeted Areas
Gainsville, Florida - Oct 29, 2012 19:03 EST

nvasive lionfish may never be eradicated from Florida's coastal waters, but it's possible to keep them under control — in specific, targeted areas and using plenty of manpower, a new University of Florida study shows. Native to the Indo-Pacific, the spiny,...
 
Whale Racket: Sounding Out How Loud The Oceans Were From Whale Vocalizing Prior To Industrial Whaling
Lagunitas, California - Oct 25, 2012 14:19 EST

Concern is growing that human-generated noise in the ocean disrupts marine animals that rely on sound for communication and navigation. In the modern ocean, the background noise can be ten times louder than it was just 50 years ago. But...
 
Researchers: Pacific Albacore Carry Barely Detectable Fingerprints Of Fukushima Disaster
Corvallis, Oregon - Oct 24, 2012 22:37 EST

Samples of albacore tuna caught off the West Coast of the United States show minute traces of radiation that can be traced to the Fukushima reactor disaster, according to an interdisciplinary team of scientists from Oregon State University and the...
 
Price Chopper Becomes First Supermarket To Voluntarily Test Seafood For Species Verification
Schenectady, NY - Oct 23, 2012 21:56 EST

Is the seafood you're buying what the label, sign or menu says it is? Concern is growing nationwide that restaurants, seafood markets and even some supermarkets are selling mislabeled seafood. Consumer Reports found that 18% of seafood samples its researchers collected...
 
Contact: Us Scientists Report Whale Making Human Voice Sounds; 'An Example Of Vocal Learning'
Washington, D.C. - Oct 22, 2012 20:37 EST

For the first time, researchers have been able to show by acoustic analysis that whales—or at least one very special white whale—can imitate the voices of humans. That's a surprise, because whales typically produce sounds in a manner that is...
 
Strong 2012 Nesting Season For Florida Loggerheads; 'Nesting Has Risen Over The Past Five Years'
Tallahassee, Florida - Oct 19, 2012 19:02 EST

Loggerhead sea turtle nesting was near a 24-year high along Florida beaches this year, according to data compiled by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) researchers. The loggerhead is listed federally as a threatened species. Trained surveyors from partners across...
 
Why Are Coastal Salt Marshes Falling Apart? 'There Are Limits To What Salt Marshes Can Do'
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Oct 19, 2012 18:37 EST

Salt marshes have been disintegrating and dying over the past two decades along the U.S. Eastern Seaboard and other highly developed coastlines without anyone fully understanding why. This week in the journal Nature, scientist Linda Deegan of the Marine Biological...
 
Research: Dolphins Can Stay Awake For 15 Days Straight; 'True Unwavering Sentinels Of The Sea'
San Diego, California - Oct 18, 2012 00:07 EST

Dolphins sleep with only one half of their brains at a time, and according to new research published Oct. 17 in the open access journal PLOS ONE, this trait allows them to stay constantly alert for at least 15 days...
 
Scientists: Coral Diseases Might Not Be Contagious; No 'Clusters Of Sick Colonies'
Sarasota, Florida - Oct 17, 2012 00:47 EST

Sick corals might be stressed but not necessarily contagious — an important finding for predicting diseases outbreaks on threatened coral reefs, according to research by Mote Marine Laboratory and Florida Institute of Technology scientists who have completed the largest-ever study...
 
Guy Harvey Launches Petition Drive To Protect Stingrays; 'Affects Every Single Person In The Cayman Islands'
The Cayman Islands - Oct 16, 2012 22:48 EST

Marine wildlife artist and conservationist Dr. Guy Harvey is leading a petition drive calling on the government of the Cayman Islands to immediately put the National Conservation Law into effect, ensuring the safety and protection of all stingrays in the...
 
Undercover Investigation: Disease, Overcrowding, Neglect At Caymans Island Turtle Farm; 'It's Truly Horrific'
Boston, Massachusetts - Oct 15, 2012 23:55 EST

A year-long undercover investigation conducted by the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA) at the Cayman Turtle Farm, a popular tourist destination and the world's last remaining facility that raises sea turtles for slaughter, has revealed disturbing animal...
 
Experts: Florida's 'Mystery Eyeball' Appears To Be From A Swordfish; Likely 'Removed By A Fisherman And Discarded'
Tampa, Florida - Oct 15, 2012 20:54 EST

After examining an eye found on a south Florida beach this week, researchers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) believe the specimen came from a swordfish. Genetic testing will be done to confirm the identification. "Experts on site...
 
Scientists Discovers New Cave-Dwelling Reef Coral In The Indo-Pacific; 'One Who Dwells In Holes'
Leiden, The Netherlands - Oct 11, 2012 22:29 EST

Coral specialist Dr. Bert W. Hoeksema of Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden, The Netherlands, recently published the description of a new coral species that lives on the ceilings of caves in Indo-Pacific coral reefs. It differs from its closest relatives...
 
Study: Prenatal Mercury Exposure From Fish May Be Associated With Risk Of ADHD-Related Behaviors
Boston, Massachusetts - Oct 8, 2012 22:59 EST

A study of children in the New Bedford, Mass., area suggests that low-level prenatal mercury exposure may be associated with a greater risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-related behaviors and that fish consumption during pregnancy may be associated with a lower...
 
Countries Propose To List Ten Shark And Ray Species Under International Wildlife Treaty
Washington, D.C. - Oct 6, 2012 19:44 EST

At least 37 countries, including the United States and Mexico, have proposed protections for ten shark and ray species under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). The U.S. will join Colombia in leading an effort to secure...
 
Study: Key Environmental Factors, Moon Seen Influencing Manta Ray Behavior
Brisbane, Queensland - Oct 4, 2012 00:21 EST

Manta rays are more likely to gather together under either a new or a full moon, according to new research published Oct 3 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Fabrice Jaine and colleagues at the University of Queensland....
 
Study: Manatees Reflect Quality Of Health In Marine Ecosystems; 'Canaries In The Mineshaft'
Fairfax, Virginia - Oct 2, 2012 23:43 EST

A longterm study conducted by researchers at George Mason University may be a benchmark in determining health threats to marine mammals. Over ten years of research in Belize was conducted studying the behavioral ecology, life history and health of manatees in...
 
Researchers: Fish Getting Smaller As The Oceans Get 'Warmer And Less-Oxygenated Ocean'
Vancouver, BC - Oct 1, 2012 23:00 EST

Changes in ocean and climate systems could lead to smaller fish, according to a new study led by fisheries scientists at the University of British Columbia. The study, published today in the journal Nature Climate Change, provides the first-ever global projection...
 
Water Never Forgets: Scientists Examine The Chemical Memory Of Seawater; 'The Largest Active Carbon Reservoirs On Earth'
Berlin, Germany - Oct 1, 2012 22:01 EST

Water does not forget, says Prof. Boris Koch, a chemist at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in the Helmholtz Association. Irrespective of what happens in the sea: whether the sun shines, algae bloom or a school...
 
Researchers: White Shark Diets Vary With Age And Among Individuals
Santa Cruz, California - Sep 30, 2012 17:20 EST

White sharks, the largest predatory sharks in the ocean, are thought of as apex predators that feed primarily on seals and sea lions. But a new study by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, shows surprising variability in...
 
Time Bomb: Unexploded Military Ordnance In Gulf Poses Threat To Shipping; 'It's Been 40 To 60 Years'
College Station, Texas - Sep 28, 2012 18:21 EST

Millions of pounds of unexploded bombs and other military ordnance that were dumped decades ago in the Gulf of Mexico, as well as off the coasts of both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, could now pose serious threats to shipping...
 


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