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Scientists Seeks Sea Urchin's Secret To Surviving Ocean Acidification; 'Almost No Negative Effects'
Palo Alto, California - Apr 9, 2013 21:00 EST

Stanford scientists have discovered that some purple sea urchins living along the coast of California and Oregon have the surprising ability to rapidly evolve in acidic ocean water – a capacity that may come in handy as climate change increases...
 
Record-Breaking 2011 Lake Erie Algae Bloom May Be Sign Of Things To Come
Ann Arbor, Michigan - Apr 4, 2013 17:52 EST

The largest harmful algae bloom in Lake Erie's recorded history was likely caused by the confluence of changing farming practices and weather conditions that are expected to become more common in the future due to climate change. Rather than an isolated,...
 
Researchers Unveil Large Robotic Jellyfish That One Day Could Patrol Oceans
Blacksburg, Virginia - Mar 28, 2013 19:25 EST

Virginia Tech College of Engineering researchers have unveiled a life-like, autonomous robotic jellyfish the size and weight of a grown man, 5 foot 7 inches in length and weighing 170 pounds. The prototype robot, nicknamed Cyro, is a larger model of...
 
Scientists Confirm First-Ever Two-Headed Bull Shark; Connection To Deepwater Horizon Spill Denied
East Lansing, Michigan - Mar 25, 2013 17:03 EST

Scientists have confirmed the discovery of the first-ever, two-headed bull shark. The study, led by Michigan State University and appearing in the Journal of Fish Biology, confirmed the specimen, found in the Gulf of Mexico April 7, 2011, was a single...
 
Study: Humans Drastically Altering Wild Stingray Behavior; 'Interactive Ecotourism' Questioned
Fort Launderdale, Florida - Mar 19, 2013 20:45 EST

Stingrays living in one of the world's most famous and heavily visited ecotourism sites — Stingray City/Sandbar in the Cayman Islands — have profoundly changed their ways, raising questions about the impact of so-called "interactive ecotourism" on marine wildlife, reports...
 
Scientists: Ocean Plankton Sponge Up Nearly Twice The Carbon Currently Assumed; 'It's So Important'
Irving, California - Mar 17, 2013 19:38 EST

Models of carbon dioxide in the world's oceans need to be revised, according to new work by UC Irvine and other scientists published online Sunday in Nature Geoscience. Trillions of plankton near the surface of warm waters are far more...
 
Researchers: 'Dirty Blizzard' In Gulf May Account For Missing Deepwater Horizon Oil
Tallahassee, Florida - Mar 16, 2013 20:02 EST

Oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill acted as a catalyst for plankton and other surface materials to clump together and fall to the sea floor in a massive sedimentation event that researchers are calling a "dirty blizzard." Jeff Chanton, the...
 
Eel Migration Study Reveals Porbeagle Shark Predation In The Gulf Of St. Lawrence
Halifax, Canada - Mar 13, 2013 22:50 EST

A tagging study has revealed that porbeagle sharks in the Gulf of St. Lawrence could severely impact the number of migrating American eels in the region. Canadian researchers tagged eight adult eels in the St. Lawrence River as part of...
 
Scientists: Glaciers Contribute Significant Iron To North Atlantic Ocean; More Than 'A Big Block Of Ice'
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Mar 12, 2013 19:32 EST

All living organisms rely on iron as an essential nutrient. In the ocean, iron's abundance or scarcity means all the difference as it fuels the growth of plankton, the base of the ocean's food web. A new study by biogeochemists and...
 
Researcher Discovers Plankton Adjusts To Changing Ocean Temperatures By 'Altering The Rhythm Of Its Pulsing Appendage'
Lubbock, Texas - Mar 11, 2013 15:03 EST

Imagine trying to swim through a pool of honey. Because of their small size, this is what swimming in water is like for tiny marine plankton. So, it was often assumed they would be easy prey, especially in the dense...
 
Scientists Tracking Sediments' Fate In Largest-Ever Dam Removal; 'This Is A Chance To Document A 100-Year Storm'
Seattle, Washington - Mar 8, 2013 19:53 EST

Salmon are beginning to swim up the Elwha River for the first time in more than a century. But University of Washington marine geologists are watching what's beginning to flow downstream – sediments from the largest dam-removal project ever undertaken....
 
Scientists Breaking The Rules For How Tsunamis Work; 'We Are Still Trying To Understand The Implications'
Los Angeles, California - Mar 7, 2013 13:50 EST

The earthquake zones off of certain coasts—like those of Japan and Java—make them especially vulnerable to tsunamis, according to a new study. They can produce a focusing point that creates massive and devastating tsunamis that break the rules for how...
 
Scientists Create New Maps Depicting Potential Worldwide Coral Bleaching By 2056
Miami, Florida - Feb 25, 2013 20:04 EST

In a study published today in Nature Climate Change researchers used the latest emissions scenarios and climate models to show how varying levels of carbon emissions are likely to result in more frequent and severe coral bleaching events. Large-scale 'mass'...
 
Study Uncovers Widespread Seafood Fraud Nationwide; 'No One Is Safe'
Washington, D.C. - Feb 21, 2013 20:48 EST

Oceana, the largest international advocacy group working solely to protect the world's oceans, uncovered widespread seafood fraud across the United States, according to a new report released today. In one of the largest seafood fraud investigations in the world to...
 
Report: Number Of Shark Attacks At 12-Yr High; 'Human-Causative Factors Are Involved'
Gainesville, Florida - Feb 11, 2013 20:44 EST

Shark attacks in the U.S. reached a decade high in 2012, while worldwide fatalities remained average, according to the University of Florida's International Shark Attack File report released today. The U.S. saw an upturn in attacks with 53, the most since...
 
Research: Magnetic Map Guides Salmon Home; 'They Imprint The Magnetic Field'
Corvallis, Oregon - Feb 7, 2013 18:28 EST

The mystery of how salmon navigate across thousands of miles of open ocean to locate their river of origin before journeying upstream to spawn has intrigued biologists for decades, and now a new study may offer a clue to the...
 
Tapeworm Eggs Discovered In 270 Million Year Old Fossil Shark Feces
Rio Grande, Brazil - Jan 30, 2013 17:35 EST

A cluster of tapeworm eggs discovered in 270-million-year-old fossilized shark feces suggests that intestinal parasites in vertebrates are much older than previously known, according to research published January 30 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Paula Dentzien-Dias and...
 
Bite Back: New Study Calls For Society To Change The Way We Refer To Shark Behavior; No 'Attacks'
Sarasota, Florida - Jan 29, 2013 17:58 EST

The term "shark attack" is typically used by the media, government officials, researchers and the public to describe almost any kind of human-shark interaction — even those where no contact or injury occurs between humans and sharks. Now, Christopher Neff of...
 
Study: Salmon Runs Boom, Go Bust Over Centuries; No 'Signal Of Commercial Fishing' In Trends
Seattle, Washington - Jan 14, 2013 21:10 EST

Salmon runs are notoriously variable: strong one year, and weak the next. New research shows that the same may be true from one century to the next. Scientists in the past 20 years have recognized that salmon stocks vary not...
 
Researcher: Florida Manatee Deaths Wane Due To Mild Winter
Tallahassee, Florida - Jan 8, 2013 19:19 EST

Researchers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) documented fewer manatee deaths in 2012 than in the previous three years, as milder winter temperatures led to significantly less cold-related mortality. The FWC recorded 392 manatee carcasses in state...
 
Study: Waterfall-Climbing Fish Use Same Mechanism To Climb Waterfalls And Eat Algae
Clemson, South Carolina - Jan 4, 2013 17:57 EST

Going against the flow is always a challenge, but some waterfall-climbing fish have adapted to their extreme lifestyle by using the same set of muscles for both climbing and eating, according to research published January 4 in the open access...
 
Sylvia Earle 'Delighted' To Join Board Of Advisors Of Ocean-Themed Web Media Property Theblu.com
Los Angeles, California - Jan 4, 2013 17:50 EST

Going against the flow is always a challenge, but some waterfall-climbing fish have adapted to their extreme lifestyle by using the same set of muscles for both climbing and eating, according to research published January 4 in the open access...
 
Study: Groundwater, Stream Water Dissolving Hawaiian Islands
Salt Lake City, Utah - Dec 21, 2012 19:37 EST

Someday, Oahu's Koolau and Waianae mountains will be reduced to nothing more than a flat, low-lying island like Midway. But erosion isn't the biggest culprit. Instead, scientists say, the mountains of Oahu are actually dissolving from within. "We tried to figure out...
 
Researchers Find Injured Coral Have Less Sex; 'they Don't Necessarily Look Damaged'
Buffalo, New York - Dec 17, 2012 21:46 EST

Coral colonies that suffered tissue damage in The Bahamas were still producing low numbers of eggs four years after the injuries occurred, according to new research by University at Buffalo scientists. Tiny sperm-producing factories called spermaries were also in short...
 
Florida: Dolphin Found Dead After Swallowing Fishing Gear; 'Her Stomach Was Full Of Fish'
Sarasota, Florida - Dec 11, 2012 21:22 EST

A local bottlenose dolphin was found dead Saturday, Dec. 8, in Venice Inlet and examined by Mote Marine Laboratory scientists, who report that it most likely died from swallowing fishing gear. This case serves as a reminder to keep waterways...
 
Study: Mercury In Coastal Fog Linked To Upwelling Of Deep Ocean Water; 'Parts-Per-Trillion Levels'
Santa Cruz, California - Dec 4, 2012 20:33 EST

An ongoing investigation of elevated mercury levels in coastal fog in California suggests that upwelling of deep ocean water along the coast brings mercury to the surface, where it enters the atmosphere and is absorbed by fog. Peter Weiss-Penzias, an environmental...
 
NOAA Proposes Listing 66 Reef-Building Coral Species Under The Endangered Species Act
Washington, D.C. - Nov 30, 2012 20:26 EST

In compliance with a federal court ordered deadline, and consistent with existing international protections, NOAA Fisheries announced today that it is proposing Endangered Species Act (ESA) listings for 66 coral species, including 59 in the Pacific and seven in the...
 
Study: Dispersants Used During Gulf Of Mexico Clean-Up Made Spill 52-Times More Toxic
Atlanta, Georgia - Nov 30, 2012 19:27 EST

If the 4.9 million barrels of oil that spilled into the Gulf of Mexico during the 2010 Deep Water Horizon spill was a ecological disaster, the two million gallons of dispersant used to clean it up apparently made it even...
 
Scientists: Ancient Microbes Found In Salty, Ice-Sealed Antarctic Lake; 'New Boundary Conditions On The Limits For Life'
Chicago, Illinois - Nov 27, 2012 19:11 EST

Shedding light on the limits of life in extreme environments, scientists have discovered abundant and diverse metabolically active bacteria in the brine of an Antarctic lake sealed under more than 65 feet of ice. The finding, described in this week's issue...
 
Researchers Pitch Idea Of 'Wave Cloaking' To Shield Floating Objects
San Diego, California - Nov 26, 2012 18:07 EST

A new approach to invisibility cloaking may one day be used at sea to shield floating objects – such as oil rigs and ships – from rough waves. Unlike most other cloaking techniques that rely on transformation optics, this one...
 
Researchers: Eating Right Key To Survival Of Whales And Dolphins
Vancouver, British Columbia - Nov 21, 2012 17:27 EST

In the marine world, high-energy prey make for high-energy predators. And to survive, such marine predators need to sustain the right kind of high-energy diet. Not just any prey will do, suggests a new study by researchers from the University...
 
Researchers Studying 'Fingerprint' Left On Seafloor By Hurricane Sandy
Newark, Delaware - Nov 19, 2012 21:30 EST

Beneath the 20-foot waves that crested off Delaware's coast during Hurricane Sandy, thrashing waters reshaped the floor of the ocean, churning up fine sand and digging deep ripples into the seabed. Fish, crustaceans and other marine life were blasted with...
 
Metabolomics: Aquarium Researchers Identify New Biomarker For Whale Shark Health
Atlanta, Georgia - Nov 19, 2012 21:14 EST

New research from Georgia Aquarium and Georgia Institute of Technology provides evidence that a suite of techniques called "metabolomics" can be used to determine the health status of whale sharks (Rhincodon typus), the world's largest fish species. The study, led...
 
Scientists: Hard To Fish Areas Of The Seabed May Act As Refuges For Endangered Skate
Bangor, Maine - Nov 16, 2012 19:08 EST

Marine scientists working in the Celtic Sea have discovered a natural refuge for the critically endangered flapper skate. Many elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates) are highly vulnerable to over-fishing, but a new paper in the open access journal PLOS ONE shows...
 
Researchers: At Least One-Third Of Marine Species Remain Undescribed; No 'Formal Way To Register Species'
New York, New York - Nov 15, 2012 16:13 EST

At least one-third of the species that inhabit the world's oceans may remain completely unknown to science. That's despite the fact that more species have been described in the last decade than in any previous one, according to a report...
 
Researchers: Changing Climate, Not Tourism, Seems To Be Driving Decline In Chinstrap-Penguin Populations; 'It's Warmed By 3 Degrees Celsius'
Stony Brook, New York - Nov 14, 2012 20:31 EST

The breeding population of chinstrap penguins has declined significantly as temperatures have rapidly warmed on the Antarctic Peninsula, according to researchers funded in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The study indicates that changing climatic conditions, rather than the impact...
 
Despite Their Thick Skins, Alligators And Crocodiles Are Surprisingly Touchy
Nashville, Tennessee - Nov 12, 2012 20:18 EST

Crocodiles and alligators are notorious for their thick skin and well-armored bodies. So it comes as something of a surprise to learn that their sense of touch is one of the most acute in the animal kingdom. The crocodilian sense of...
 
Researchers: Corals Attacked By Toxic Seaweed Use Chemical 911 Signals To Summon Help
Atlanta, Georgia - Nov 8, 2012 16:26 EST

Corals under attack by toxic seaweed do what anyone might do when threatened – they call for help. A study reported this week in the journal Science shows that threatened corals send signals to fish "bodyguards" that quickly respond to...
 
Sitting Still Or Going Hunting: Which Works Better? 'Swimming Costs Matter'
Cambridge, Massachusetts - Nov 5, 2012 20:39 EST

For the kinds of animals that are most familiar to us — ones that are big enough to see — it's a no-brainer: Is it better to sit around and wait for food to come to you, or to move...
 
Research: Controlling Invasive Lionfish May Best Be Done In Targeted Areas
Gainsville, Florida - Oct 29, 2012 19:03 EST

nvasive lionfish may never be eradicated from Florida's coastal waters, but it's possible to keep them under control — in specific, targeted areas and using plenty of manpower, a new University of Florida study shows. Native to the Indo-Pacific, the spiny,...
 
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