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Researchers: New 'Legal Drugs' Could Help Goldfish And Koi With Fish Lice
Gainsville, Florida - Apr 18, 2011 20:35 EST

The lack of legal ways to eliminate fish lice is frustrating for goldfish and koi enthusiasts, but a University of Florida study in the Journal of Aquatic Animal Health reports that a cure is in the works. Fish lice, which are...
 
Researchers: Pumping Oxygenated Water Down To A Depth Of 120 Meters Can Save The Baltic Sea
Gothenburg, Sweden - Apr 18, 2011 19:43 EST

Scientists have shown that oxygenation can bring dead sea bottoms to life. This creates the necessary conditions for the establishment of new ecosystems that enable nature itself to deal with eutrophication. By conducting pilot studies in two fjords in Sweden,...
 
The Feathers Have It: Mercury On The Rise In Endangered Pacific Seabirds
Boston, Massachusetts - Apr 18, 2011 19:26 EST

Using 120 years of feathers from natural history museums in the United States, Harvard University researchers have been able to track increases in the neurotoxin methylmercury in the black-footed albatross (Phoebastria nigripes), an endangered seabird that forages extensively throughout the...
 
Professor Christopher McQuaid Named Gilchrist Award Winner For 'Enhancement Of Marine And Coastal Science In South Africa'
Grahamstown, South Africa - Apr 18, 2011 18:09 EST

Rhodes University's Prof Christopher McQuaid has been awarded the prestigious Gilchrist Award for his "outstanding contribution to the enhancement of marine and coastal science in South Africa including the Southern Ocean". The South African Network for Coastal and Oceanic Research (SANCOR)...
 
'This Is Your Ocean: Sharks' To Premiere At Newport Film Festival; Guy Harvey, Wyland, Jim Abernethy To Attend Showing
Newport Beach, California - Apr 18, 2011 17:21 EST

International marine and wildlife conservation artists Guy Harvey and Wyland join with renown SCUBA diver and wildlife photographer Jim Abernathy to showcase This is Your Ocean: Sharks, as the Eco Spotlight feature at the Newport Beach Film Festival, scheduled for April...
 
Scientists: Ocean Warming Detrimental To Inshore Fish Species; 'Slowing Growth And Increased Physiological Stress'
Tasmania, Australia - Apr 18, 2011 12:17 EST

The findings of a study published today in Nature Climate Change indicate negative effects on the growth of a long-lived south-east Australian and New Zealand inshore species – the banded morwong. Scientific monitoring since 1944 by CSIRO at Maria Island,...
 
Rowing Expedition To Use First Miniature Sensors To Measure The Temperature Of The World's Oceans
Swanton Morley, UK - Apr 15, 2011 16:45 EST

The first miniature sensors designed to measure saltiness and temperature across the world's oceans will be put in use later this week on an ambitious expedition. A four-man team of officers from Swanton Morley, UK, will set off to row 3,100...
 
Outreach: NOAA Names Former Commercial Fisherman As Fishing Industry Compliance Liaison; 'I Speak The Regulatory Language'
Silver Spring, Maryland - Apr 15, 2011 16:35 EST

Building on NOAA's previous actions to improve its enforcement program and to strengthen its efforts to improve communication with and outreach to the fishing industry, a former commercial fisherman has been tapped as NOAA Office of Law Enforcement's compliance assistance...
 
Study: Bone-Munching Worms From The Deep Sea Thrive On A Variety Of Bones; 'Very Satisfying'
San Diego, California - Apr 14, 2011 19:25 EST

A new study led by a scientist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego is painting a more complete picture of an extraordinary sea worm that makes its living in the depths of the ocean on the bones...
 
Humpback Whale Songs Spread Eastward Like The Latest Pop Tune; 'Cultural Change On A Vast Scale'
Brisbane, Queensland - Apr 14, 2011 19:18 EST

Humpback whales have their own version of the hit single, according to a study reported online on April 14th in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. at any given time within a population, male humpbacks all sing the same mating...
 
Researchers Develop Foam Material To Remove Radioactive Contaminants From Drinking Water
Raleigh, North Carolina - Apr 14, 2011 19:10 EST

A combination of forest byproducts and crustacean shells may be the key to removing radioactive materials from drinking water, researchers from North Carolina State University have found. "As we're currently seeing in Japan, one of the major health risks posed by...
 
Bass Angler Pearson Fired Up For Lake Chickamauga Tournament; 'Almost Giddy'
Hixon, Tennessee - Apr 14, 2011 19:04 EST

Christmas is more than eight months away, but for GEICO angler Robert Pearson, it could come early. Pearson has high hopes in this weekend's Walmart FLW Tour event on Lake Chickamauga in Hixson, Tenn. Despite the fact he hasn't fished this...
 
Deep Dive: Expedition To Extend Human Intervention Within Mesophotic Zone; 'Like Diving The Grand Canyon'
Providence, Rhode Island - Apr 14, 2011 11:26 EST

Ocean Opportunity, a Rhode Island based not for profit organization, is pleased to announce a forthcoming expedition to explore and document the natural history of the mesophotic, or 'middle light', zone from 200 to 500 feet in the Exumas, Bahamas...
 
Scientists Propose Large-Scale Expansion Of 'Rigs To Reefs' Programs; 'Policy Based On Science Is Badly Needed'
Sydney, Australia - Apr 14, 2011 10:13 EST

It might seem surprising that marine scientists are proposing a way for the oil and gas industry to save billions of dollars decommissioning old offshore rigs, but it's a plan where the main beneficiary is intended to be the environment. In...
 
Study: Invasive Mussels Causing Massive Ecological Changes In Great Lakes; 'These Changes Are Unprecedented'
Ann Arbor, Michigan - Apr 13, 2011 19:21 EST

The ongoing spread of non-native mussels in the Great Lakes has caused "massive, ecosystem-wide changes" throughout lakes Michigan and Huron, two of the planet's largest freshwater lakes, according to a new University of Michigan-led study. The blitzkrieg advance of two...
 
Study: Death -- Not Just Life -- Important Link In Marine Ecosystems; Copepod Carcasses 'Fuel Microbes'
Washington, D.C. - Apr 13, 2011 18:57 EST

Tiny crustaceans called copepods rule the world, at least when it comes to oceans and estuaries. The most numerous multi-cellular organisms in the seas, copepods are an important link between phytoplankton and fish in marine food webs. To understand and predict how...
 
NOAA Issues Regulations Governing Navy's Sonar Testing Activities In The Keyport, Washington Range
Silver Spring, Maryland - Apr 12, 2011 19:50 EST

NOAA's Fisheries Service has issued regulations and a letter of authorization (LOA) to the U.S. Navy that includes measures to protect marine mammals while conducting research, development, test and evaluation activities and range expansion at the Naval Sea System Command...
 
Costa Rican Officials Seize Over 7000 Kilos Of Illegal Sailfish Meat From Seafood Exporter
Fort Lauderdale, Florida - Apr 12, 2011 19:35 EST

Costa Rican government officials have released information to The Billfish Foundation (TBF) regarding the seizure of over 7,000 kilos of sailfish meat from a seafood exporter. Sailfish are protected species in the popular Costa Rican fishery. Investigators from two...
 
Risky Strategy Doesn't Pan Out For Bass Angler Bradley; 'We sort of made a decision which kind of bit us'
Woodbridge, Virginia - Apr 11, 2011 17:50 EST

GEICO angler Christiana Bradley got the weather conditions she wanted at Sunday's LAPR Bass Series Potomac River Bass Series event at Leesylvania Park, she just didn't get the fish. "I got what I wished for as far as the weather goes,"...
 
Research: After 40 Million Years, King Crabs Invade Antarctica; 'They Are Coming From The Deep'
Birmingham, Alabama - Apr 11, 2011 10:08 EST

It's like a scene out of a sci-fi movie – thousands, possibly millions, of king crabs are marching through icy deep-sea waters and up the Antarctic slope. "They are coming from the deep, somewhere between 6,000 to 9,000 feet down," said...
 
Feather-Loss Disorder: Emergence Of 'Naked' Penguins Baffle Experts
Bronx, New York - Apr 9, 2011 11:50 EST

Researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the University of Washington, and other groups are grappling with a wildlife mystery: Why are some penguin chicks losing their feathers? The appearance of "naked" penguins—afflicted with what is known as feather-loss disorder—in penguin...
 
Bass Fisher Christiana Bradley's Weekend Hinges On A Lot Of Variables
Woodbridge, Virginia - Apr 8, 2011 17:48 EST

The LAPR Bass Series presents a different kind of fishing for GEICO pro angler Christiana Bradley. This weekend's LAPR event is a one-day tournament that launches from Leesylvania Park on Sunday, which doesn't give Bradley much time to come up with...
 
New Research Shows Aquaculture Discharge May Not Disperse Evenly In Open Water; Dilution 'Not The Solution'
Washington, D.C. - Apr 7, 2011 19:43 EST

Concentrated waste plumes from fish farms could travel significant distances to reach coastlines, according to a study to be published in an upcoming issue of the journal Environmental Fluid Mechanics, available online now. Roz Naylor, Oliver Fringer and Jeffrey Koseff...
 
Research Expedition To Study Coral Reefs Worldwide To Be Launched In The Bahamas
Nassau, The Bahamas - Apr 7, 2011 19:07 EST

The Living Oceans Foundation has chosen The Bahamas for the opening of its Global Reef Expedition, a five year, world–wide study of the health of the coral reef environments. In making the announcement, Captain Philip Renaud, USN (ret), the Foundation's Executive...
 
Scientist: Ancient Corals Provide Insight On The Future Of Caribbean Reefs; 'Corals Will Likely Survive'
Coral Gables, Forida - Apr 7, 2011 18:11 EST

Climate change is already widely recognized to be negatively affecting coral reef ecosystems around the world, yet the long-term effects are difficult to predict. University of Miami (UM) scientists are using the geologic record of Caribbean corals to understand how...
 
Group: Oil Disaster In Gulf Of Mexico Pushes Already Imperiled Dwarf Seahorse Closer To Extinction
New Orleans, Louisiana - Apr 7, 2011 17:18 EST

The Center for Biological Diversity today filed a petition seeking Endangered Species Act protection for the dwarf seahorse, a one-inch long seahorse that lives in seagrass beds in the Gulf of Mexico, Florida and the Caribbean. The seahorse is threatened...
 
Where Will The Debris From Japan's Tsunami Drift In The Ocean?
Manoa, Hawaii - Apr 6, 2011 18:25 EST

The huge tsunami triggered by the 9.0 Tohoku Earthquake destroyed coastal towns near Sendai in Japan, washing such things as houses and cars into the ocean. Projections of where this debris might head have been made by Nikolai Maximenko and...
 
World's Reef Fishes Tussling With Human Overpopulation; 'The Results Of The Study Were Stunning'
Halifax, Canada - Apr 5, 2011 17:39 EST

"Coral reefs provide a range of critical goods and services to humanity—everything from nutrient cycling to food production to coast protection to economic revenues through tourism," says Camilo Mora at Dalhousie University and lead researcher of the study. "Yet the...
 
The Day After Tomorrow: Icy Meltwater Pooling In Arctic Ocean Becomes A Wild Card In Climate Change Scenarios
OOSTENDE, Belgium - Apr 5, 2011 17:27 EST

A massive, growing pool of icy meltwater in the Arctic Ocean is a wild card in future climate scenarios, European researchers said today. Estimated in 2009 at more than 7,500 cubic km – twice the volume of Africa's Lake Victoria...
 
Found: Woods Hole Team Locates Air France Flight 447 Wreckage; 'We Were Searching In The Right Area'
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Apr 5, 2011 10:46 EST

A search team led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has located the wreckage of Air France Flight 447 some 3,900 meters, or nearly 2.5 miles, below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean off Brazil's northeastern coast. The team...
 
Study: Leatherback Sea Turtle Nests Increasing In Florida; Climate Change 'Reducing Predators'?
Durham, North Carolina - Apr 4, 2011 20:08 EST

The number of endangered leatherback sea turtle nests at 68 beaches in Florida has increased by 10.2 percent a year since 1979, according to a new Duke University-led study published in the current issue of the journal Ecological Applications. Some beaches...
 
New Fishing Hooks Spares Bluefin Tuna In Gulf Of Mexico But Allows Yellowfin Tuna And Swordfish Catches; 'New Technology'
Silver Spring, Maryland - Apr 4, 2011 19:28 EST

NOAA's Fisheries Service will require commercial fishermen who fish for yellowfin tuna, swordfish and other species with longlines in the Gulf of Mexico to use a new type of hook, called a weak hook, designed to reduce the incidental catch...
 
'Shark Men' Set For New Season; 'Catch And Release' Great White Shark Wranglers Team Up Again With Researcher
Washington, D.C. - Apr 4, 2011 18:48 EST

Science and sport fishing join forces for an unprecedented hands-on research effort to study wild great whites, when Shark Men season two kicks off with back-to-back premieres Sunday, April 10, at 9 p.m. ET/PT on the National Geographic Channel (NGC)....
 
High School Student Discovers Flair For Dissecting Fish Brains; 'This Work Required Very Strong, Fine Movements'
Brooklyn, New York - Mar 31, 2011 20:17 EST

Spencer Kim, a senior at Sheepshead Bay High School, discovered he has a peculiar talent: He is an excellent dissector of fish brains. "I've played handball and done tae kwon do," he says, "but those don't require delicate movements. This work...
 
Research: Antibacterial Soap Additive Quickly Accumulates In Fish
Anaheim, California - Mar 31, 2011 19:47 EST

In the first report on the uptake and internal processing of triclocarban (TCC) in fish, scientists today reported strong evidence that TCC — an antibacterial ingredient in some soaps and the source of environmental health concerns because of its potential...
 
Study: 'Superfish' With Bigger Hearts Better Equipped For Climate Change; 'They've Adapted'
Vancouver, British Columbia - Mar 31, 2011 18:56 EST

Populations of Fraser River sockeye salmon are so fine-tuned to their environment that any further environmental changes caused by climate change could lead to the disappearance of some populations, while others may be less affected, says a new study by...
 
Biologists Discover New Nudibranch In Florida Fisherman's Catch
Tallahassee, Florida - Mar 31, 2011 18:02 EST

Biologists with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), along with scientists from California State Polytechnic University, have identified a new marine species found in the Gulf of Mexico. A scientific publication released Thursday officially announced the discovery of...
 
Scientists: 2,000 Year-Old Deep-Sea Black Corals Call Gulf Of Mexico Home
Santa Cruz, Californai - Mar 30, 2011 17:44 EST

For the first time, scientists have been able to validate the age of deep-sea black corals in the Gulf of Mexico. They found the Gulf is home to 2,000 year-old deep-sea black corals, many of which are only a...
 
Scientists: Arctic Ocean Has Become Less Salty, More Unstable
Bremerhaven, Germany - Mar 29, 2011 16:32 EST

The freshwater content of the upper Arctic Ocean has increased by about 20 percent since the 1990s. This corresponds to a rise of approximately 8,400 cubic kilometers and has the same magnitude as the volume of freshwater annually exported on...
 
Survey: Haiti's Coral Reefs Most Overfished In The World; 'No Food Fish Of Reproductive Age'
Pacific Palisades, California - Mar 28, 2011 20:56 EST

Haiti's coral reefs are the most overfished in the world according to initial survey results by Reef Check, a non-profit organization focused on improving reef health worldwide. The first round of surveys completed on February 7th revealed that almost no...
 


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