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Study: All Ocean Systems Undermined By Climate Change By 2100; 'Everything' Impacted
San Diego, California - Oct 18, 2013 17:54 EST

An ambitious new study that includes Lisa Levin of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego describes the full chain of events by which ocean biogeochemical changes triggered by manmade greenhouse gas emissions may cascade through marine habitats and...
 
Researchers Find Water And Lava, But -- Curiously -- No Explosion; 'Kinder, Genter' Reaction
Buffalo, New York - Oct 10, 2013 16:56 EST

Rocky pillars dotting Iceland's Skaelingar valley were projectiles tossed into the fields by warring trolls. That, at least, is the tale that University at Buffalo geologist Tracy Gregg heard from a tour guide and local hiker when she visited the...
 
Genetics Used To Sort Out Poorly Known -- And Hunted -- Whale Species
New York, New York - Oct 3, 2013 20:57 EST

Saving the whales often means knowing—sometimes genetically—one group of whales from another, say researchers attempting to define populations of a medium-sized and poorly understood baleen whale that is sometimes targeted by Japan's scientific whaling program. In a new study, scientists...
 
Cold, Salty And Promiscuous -- Gene-Shuffling Microbes Dominate Antarctica's Deep Lake; 'There Is So Much Stuff In There'
Walnut Creek, California - Sep 30, 2013 20:50 EST

Sequestered in Antarctica's Vestfold Hills, Deep Lake became isolated from the ocean 3,500 years ago by the Antarctic continent rising, resulting in a saltwater ecosystem that remains liquid in extreme cold, and providing researchers a unique niche for studying the...
 
Scientists: Deep Sea Ecosystem May Take Decades To Recover From Deepwater Horizon Spill
Reno, Nevada - Sep 28, 2013 19:04 EST

The deep-sea soft-sediment ecosystem in the immediate area of the 2010's Deepwater Horizon well head blowout and subsequent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico will likely take decades to recover from the spill's impacts, according to a scientific paper...
 
Breathing Underwater: Researchers Uncover Evidence Of Microscopic Life In Oceanic Crust
East Boothbay, Maine - Sep 28, 2013 18:43 EST

Although long thought to be devoid of life, the bottom of the deep ocean is now known to harbor entire ecosystems teeming with microbes. Scientists have recently documented that oxygen is disappearing from seawater circulating through deep oceanic crust, a...
 
Research Reveals Bottom Side-Roll Feeding Techniques Of Tagged Humpback Whales
Durham, New Hampshire - Sep 26, 2013 21:07 EST

New NOAA-led research on tagged humpback whales in Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary reveals a variety of previously unknown feeding techniques along the seafloor. Rather than a single bottom feeding behavior, the whales show three distinct feeding approaches: simple side-rolls,...
 
Study: Urban Fish Masculinized By Hormone-Mimicking Chemicals
Davis, California - Sep 25, 2013 23:34 EST

It's a man's world for fish in a San Francisco Bay-Delta estuary. Silverside fish collected from an urban beach in Suisun Marsh were more masculinized, but with smaller and less healthy gonads, than were neighboring silversides swimming near a cattle ranch...
 
Scientists: Mantas, Devil Rays Butchered For Apothecary Trade Now Identifiable
Seattle, Washington - Sep 19, 2013 18:36 EST

Since dried filters from the mouths of filter-feeding rays hit apothecary shop menus in Asia – the thought being that eating ground-up filters will cleanse one's liver – there's been no way to know which of these gentle-natured rays...
 
Study: Stronger Winds Explain Puzzling Growth Of Sea Ice In Antarctica; 'The Ice Just Survives Longer'
Seatlle, Washington - Sep 18, 2013 17:56 EST

Much attention is paid to melting sea ice in the Arctic. But less clear is the situation on the other side of the planet. Despite warmer air and oceans, there's more sea ice in Antarctica now than in the 1970s...
 
Plankton Portal To Use Crowd-Sourcing To Classify Strange Oceanic Creatures; 'Human Eye' Needed
Miami, Florida - Sep 17, 2013 17:39 EST

Today, an online citizen-science project launches called "Plankton Portal" was created by researchers at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (RSMAS) in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Science...
 
Researchers: Viruses Associated With Coral Epidemic Of 'White Plague'
Corvallis, Oregon - Sep 13, 2013 18:08 EST

They call it the "white plague," and like its black counterpart from the Middle Ages, it conjures up visions of catastrophic death, with a cause that was at first uncertain even as it led to widespread destruction – on marine...
 
Unprecedented Rate And Scale Of Ocean Acidification Found In The Arctic; Melted Sea Ice 'Adds Fuel To Fire'
Tampa, Florida - Sep 13, 2013 17:54 EST

Acidification of the Arctic Ocean is occurring faster than projected according to new findings published in the journal PLoS One. The increase in rate is being blamed on rapidly melting sea ice, a process that may have important consequences for...
 
AC Or DC? 2 Newly Described Electric Fish From The Amazon Are Wired Differently
Ithaca, New York - Aug 28, 2013 20:55 EST

Much as human siblings can have vastly different personalities despite their similar resemblance and genetics, two closely related species of electric fish from the Amazon produce very different electric signals. These species, new to science, are described in the open...
 
Research: 'Zombie Fish' Can Reproduce Long After Death; 'Stored Sperm' A First For Vertebrates
Riverside, California - Aug 27, 2013 20:48 EST

Performing experiments in a river in Trinidad, a team of evolutionary biologists has found that male guppies continue to reproduce for at least ten months after they die, living on as stored sperm in females, who have much longer lifespans...
 
Crocodile Confession: Meat-Eating Predators Sometimes Consume Fruit; 'Appears Widespread'
New York, New York - Aug 22, 2013 17:53 EST

It turns out that alligators do not live on meat alone. Neither do Nile crocodiles. A new study led by the Wildlife Conservation Society says that the American alligator and a dozen other crocodile species enjoy an occasional taste of...
 
Torpedo Shot From USS Iowa In 1899 Surfaces; 'Several Museums Are Interested'
Washington, D.C. - Aug 20, 2013 19:16 EST

Naval History and Heritage Command's (NHHC) Underwater Archeology Branch (UAB) dove into the history of a recently-discovered late-19th century No. 24 Howell Torpedo, Aug. 9, and they scored a direct hit. "We started looking through SECNAV (Secretary of the Navy)...
 
Researchers: Dolphins Keep Lifelong Social Memories, Longest In A Non-Human Species; 'Consistent With Humans'
Chicago, Illinois - Aug 8, 2013 17:03 EST

Dolphins can recognize their old tank mates' whistles after being separated for more than 20 years — the longest social memory ever recorded for a non-human species. The remarkable memory feat is another indication that dolphins have a level of cognitive...
 
Explorer Trains In Exosuit, New Advanced Diving System That Can Reach 1000 Feet; 'Working In A New Frontier'
Providence, Rhode Island - Aug 7, 2013 19:51 EST

Ocean Opportunity, a Rhode Island based not for profit organization, is pleased to announce that its founder, Rhode Island native Michael Lombardi recently became among the first to train in the new deep diving system called the Exosuit. The Exosuit is...
 
U.S. Navy Ships Participate In Marine Mammal Studies Of Sonar Responses
Washington, D.C. - Aug 7, 2013 19:11 EST

Independent researchers working in coordination with the Navy ships USS Dewey (DDG 105) and USS Cape St. George (CG 71) conducted ground-breaking marine mammal behavioral response studies (BRSs) on the Navy's Southern California Offshore Range in July. The studies occurred July...
 
2013 Ocean Art Underwater Photo Competition Announced; Over $75,000 In Prizes Will Be Awarded
Santa Monica, California - Aug 6, 2013 20:26 EST

Underwater Photography Guide is proud to announce that it is accepting entries for the Ocean Art Photo Competition 2013. There are over $75,000 worth of prizes, including over 35 liveaboard and scuba diving resort packages, dive equipment, and much more. Grand...
 
Bite Back: Shark Scientists Urge Media To Use New Labels In Reporting Shark 'Attacks'
Phoenix, Arizona - Aug 5, 2013 18:07 EST

The American Elasmobranch Society (AES), the leading society of shark researchers in the U.S., is calling upon the Associated Press, Reuters and other media outlets to update their guidelines for editors and reporters to support more accurate stories on shark-human...
 
Odyssey Marine Recovers Record 1.8 Million Ounces Of Silver From Shipwreck Three Miles Deep
Tampa, Florida - Jul 22, 2013 22:24 EST

Odyssey Marine Exploration, pioneers in the field of deep-ocean exploration, has recovered over 61 tons of silver bullion this month from a depth of nearly three miles. This recovery of bullion from the SS Gairsoppa, a 412-foot steel-hulled British cargo ship...
 
Study: Manatees Are Touchy-Feely To The Extreme; 'We Needed To Put Their Senses To The Test'
Sarasota, Florida - Jul 18, 2013 16:25 EST

Manatees can feel water movements thousands of times smaller than the width of a human hair — an ability that makes them one of the most touch-sensitive mammals on Earth — according to a new study led by scientists at...
 
Study: Deepwater Horizon Debris As Likely Source Of Gulf Of Mexico Oil Sheens; 'Fundamental Science Finds A Real World Application'
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Jul 16, 2013 21:28 EST

A chemical analysis of oil sheens found floating recently at the ocean's surface near the site of the Deepwater Horizon disaster indicates that the source is pockets of oil trapped within the wreckage of the sunken rig. Both the Macondo...
 
Scientists Model Long-Term Sea-Level Rise In Response To Warming Of Planet; 2.3 Meters Per Degree Celsius Rise
Corvallis, Oregon - Jul 15, 2013 23:32 EST

A new study estimates that global sea levels will rise about 2.3 meters, or more than seven feet, over the next several thousand years for every degree (Celsius) the planet warms. This international study is one of the first to combine...
 
Scientists Eye Whale Earwax To Study Contaminants In Oceans; 'It's Not Easy; It's Very Tedious'
Waco, Texas - Jun 28, 2013 20:02 EST

Whale earwax is not a topic that usually comes up on a walk to get coffee, but it did for Baylor U. researchers Dr. Stephen Trumble, assistant professor of biology, and Dr. Sascha Usenko, assistant professor of environmental science. They were...
 
Not Endangered: Feds Decline To Protect U.S. West Coast Great White Sharks; 'The Wrong Decision'
Washington, D.C. - Jun 28, 2013 19:26 EST

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) today declined to protect great white sharks off the coast of California under the Endangered Species Act. Although peer-reviewed scientific population estimates at the two primary white shark aggregation sites indicate fewer than 350...
 
Scientists Discover Thriving Colonies Of Microbes In Ocean 'Plastisphere'
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Jun 27, 2013 20:12 EST

Scientists have discovered a diverse multitude of microbes colonizing and thriving on flecks of plastic that have polluted the oceans—a vast new human-made flotilla of microbial communities that they have dubbed the "plastisphere." In a study recently published online in Environmental...
 
Researchers: Resourceful Microbes Reign In World's Oceans, Devoid Of 'Genomic Pork'
East Boothbay, Maine - Jun 25, 2013 19:29 EST

research team led by Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences has discovered that marine microbes are adapted to very narrow and specialized niches in their environment. This may explain why so few of these microbes—usually less than 1%—can be grown for...
 
Researchers Uncover Fatal Attraction: Dolphins Choking On Fish, Fishing Line
Orlando, Florida - Jun 24, 2013 20:26 EST

A team of scientists from SeaWorld and the Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute has uncovered an unusual cause of death among bottlenose dolphins in Florida's Indian River Lagoon: asphyxiation (choking) by ingestion of certain fish. "This is the first study documenting a statistically...
 
Scientists 'tailing' Spiny Lobster Larvae To Protect Them; 'Larval Lobster Credits' A 'Viable Cooperative Management Strategy'
Miami, Florida - Jun 14, 2013 19:25 EST

The commercial value of spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) in the Caribbean reaches $1 billion annually, thus making it one of the most valuable fisheries in the region. In a new study of this iconic species, Ph.D. candidate Andrew Kough and...
 
Researchers Developing Techniques For Tuna Aquaculture In U.S.; 'There Is A Lot Of Commercial Potential'
Kingston, Rhode Island - Jun 13, 2013 19:22 EST

Swimming around and around in a 20,000 gallon tank at the University of Rhode Island's Bay Campus are several large yellowfin tuna captured last fall about 100 miles off the Rhode Island coast. The fish are part of the first...
 
Study Questions Iron Seeding For Ocean C02 Sequestration; Phytoplankton 'Hogging The Food'
Lemont, Illinois - Jun 12, 2013 20:01 EST

A new study on the feeding habits of ocean microbes calls into question the potential use of algal blooms to trap carbon dioxide and offset rising global levels. These blooms contain iron-eating microscopic phytoplankton that absorb C02 from the air...
 
Study: 'Living Fossil' Sturgeons Evolving At Rapid Pace; 'They're Kind Of An Outlier'
Ann Arbor, Michigan - Jun 7, 2013 16:28 EST

Efforts to restore sturgeon in the Great Lakes region have received a lot of attention in recent years, and many of the news stories note that the prehistoric-looking fish are "living fossils" virtually unchanged for millions of years. But a new...
 
Scientists Confirm Theory Regarding The Origins Of The Sucking Disc Of Remoras
Washington, D.C. - Jun 6, 2013 20:35 EST

Remora fish, with a sucking disc on top of their heads, have been the stuff of legend. They often attach themselves to the hulls of boats and in ancient times were thought to purposely slow the boat down. While that...
 
Researchers Discover A New Way Fish Camouflage Themselves In The Ocean
Austin, Texas - Jun 4, 2013 23:30 EST

Fish can hide in the open ocean by manipulating how light reflects off their skin, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. The discovery could someday lead to the development of new camouflage materials for use in...
 
Researchers: Sharks Worth More Alive Than Dead; Ecotourism Netting Over $314 Million Annually
Vancouver, BC - May 31, 2013 20:40 EST

Sharks are worth more in the ocean than in a bowl of soup, according to researchers from the University of British Columbia. A new study, published today in Oryx – The International Journal of Conservation, shows that shark ecotourism currently generates...
 
Atlantic Research Expedition Uncovers Vast Methane-Based Ecosystem In The Deep Atlantic; 'Our Biggest Discovery'
Wilmington, North Carolina - May 29, 2013 19:05 EST

A marine research expedition sponsored by the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has led to the discovery of perhaps the world's largest methane cold seep by two university-based research teams...
 
Scientists Find Possible Solution To An Ancient Enigma: What Happened To The Stromatolites?
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - May 28, 2013 20:38 EST

The widespread disappearance of stromatolites, the earliest visible manifestation of life on Earth, may have been driven by single-celled organisms called foraminifera. The findings, by scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI); Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the University of Connecticut; Harvard...
 
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