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Americas Newswire

A 'Shark's Eye' View: Scientists Strap 'Flight Data Recorders' On Sharks, Get Interesting Results
Honolulu, Hawaii - Feb 27, 2014 18:08 EST

Instruments strapped onto and ingested by sharks are revealing novel insights into how one of the most feared and least understood ocean predators swims, eats and lives. For the first time, researchers at the University of Hawaii and the University of...
 
Fight Back: War On Lionfish Shows First Promise Of Success; 'Complete Extirpation Is Not Necessary'
Corvallis, Oregon - Jan 22, 2014 20:51 EST

It may take a legion of scuba divers armed with nets and spears, but a new study confirms for the first time that controlling lionfish populations in the western Atlantic Ocean can pave the way for a recovery of native...
 
Researchers Discover Sea Anemone Living On Ice, Hanging Upside Down; 'The Pictures Blew My Mind'
Lincoln, Nebraska - Jan 20, 2014 16:43 EST

National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, while using a camera-equipped robot to survey the area under Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf, unexpectedly discovered a new species of small sea anemones that were burrowed into the ice, their...
 
Chemical Warfare On Coral Reefs: Suppressing A Competitor Enhances Susceptibility To A Predator
Atlanta, Georgia - Jan 9, 2014 20:30 EST

Researchers examining the chemical warfare taking place on Fijian coral reefs have found that one species of seaweed increases its production of noxious anti-coral compounds when placed into contact with reef-building corals. But as it competes chemically with the corals,...
 
Study: Seashell Loss Due To Tourism Increase May Have Global Impact; 'We Should Not Ignore This Issue'
Gainsville, Florida - Jan 9, 2014 11:47 EST

Global tourism has increased fourfold over the last 30 years, resulting in human-induced seashell loss that may harm natural habitats worldwide, according to a University of Florida scientist. Appearing in the journal PLOS ONE on Jan. 8, the new study by...
 
Radiocarbon Dating Suggests White Sharks Can Live 70 Years And Longer
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Jan 8, 2014 23:53 EST

Adult white sharks, also known as great whites, may live far longer than previously thought, according to a new study that used radiocarbon dating to determine age estimates for white sharks in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Sharks are typically aged by...
 
Scientists Uncover Hidden Rubbish Threatening To Devastate Wildlife In The River Thames
London, England - Jan 2, 2014 18:04 EST

Thousands of pieces of plastic have been discovered, submerged along the river bed of the upper Thames Estuary by scientists at Royal Holloway, University of London and the Natural History Museum. The sheer amount of plastic recovered shows there is an...
 
Research: Damaged Coral Reefs Can Recover, Worth Saving; 'some Say It's A Lost Cause'
Gainsville, Florida - Dec 19, 2013 20:10 EST

Although some scientists suggest that coral reefs are headed for certain doom, a new study by University of Florida and Caribbean researchers indicates even damaged reefs can recover. In a 13-year study in the Cayman Islands, warm ocean temperatures led to...
 
Ocean Art Underwater Photo Contest Winners Announced
Culver City, California - Dec 19, 2013 00:40 EST

The prestigious Ocean Art Underwater Photo Competition, organized by the Underwater Photography Guide, has announced the 2013 winners. This year's Ocean Art Competition attracted a very high caliber of photos, representing entrants from over 50 countries. Over $80,000 of prizes will...
 
Survey Of Deep-Sea 'Chemical Munitions' Dump Off Southern California Reveals No Chemical Munitions
San Francisco, California - Dec 11, 2013 18:55 EST

Since World War II, US nautical charts have shown seven "chemical munitions dumping areas" along the Pacific Coast between San Francisco and the Mexican border. However, little or no information is available about the amount, location, or nature of the...
 
Large Study Shows Pollution Impact On Coral Reefs -- And Offers Solution
Corvallis, Oregon - Nov 26, 2013 18:09 EST

One of the largest and longest experiments ever done to test the impact of nutrient loading on coral reefs today confirmed what scientists have long suspected – that this type of pollution from sewage, agricultural practices or other sources can...
 
Study: Parts Of Great White Genome More Closely Related To Humans Than Zebrafish; 'It's Intriguing'
Fort Lauderdale, Florida - Nov 20, 2013 19:32 EST

The great white shark, a major apex predator made famous by the movie "Jaws," is one of the world's most iconic species capturing an extraordinary amount of public fascination. An intriguing question is what makes a white shark so distinctive?...
 
Study: Calcite Crusts Of Arctic Algae, Underwater 'tree Rings', Record 650 Years Of Sea Ice Change
Toronto, Canada - Nov 18, 2013 23:16 EST

Almost 650 years of annual change in sea-ice cover can been seen in the calcite crust growth layers of seafloor algae, says a new study from the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM). "This is the first time coralline algae have...
 
Researchers: Stingray Movement Could Inspire The Next Generation Of Submarines
Buffalo, New York - Nov 14, 2013 18:56 EST

Stingrays swim through water with such ease that researchers from the University at Buffalo and Harvard University are studying how their movements could be used to design more agile and fuel-efficient unmanned underwater vehicles. The vehicles could allow researchers to more...
 
Scientists Track Young Salmon's First Moves In The Ocean; Current, Water Temperature Determine Behavior
Richland, Washington - Nov 11, 2013 18:50 EST

Basic ocean conditions such as current directions and water temperature play a huge role in determining the behavior of young migrating salmon as they move from rivers and hit ocean waters for the first time, according to new research. The...
 
Feast And Famine On The Abyssal Plain; 'Marine Snow' Bring Food From Above
Monterey, California - Nov 11, 2013 18:23 EST

Animals living on the abyssal plain, miles below the ocean surface, don't usually get much to eat. Their main source of food is "marine snow"—a slow drift of mucus, fecal pellets, and body parts—that sinks down from the surface waters....
 
Whale Wars: Series Returns To Animal Planet, With 'Leaderless' Sea Shepherds At The Crossroads
New York, New York - Nov 7, 2013 20:48 EST

For the past 35 years, the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society has been led by Captain Paul Watson. A co-founder of Greenpeace, Watson has been labeled as an eco-terrorist, an outlaw and even a pirate. And for the past five seasons...
 
Researcher Hopes To Use Underwater Kites On Liquid 'Breezes' To Generate Electricity
Worcester, Massachusetts - Nov 7, 2013 20:20 EST

As the world looks for new ways to wean itself from fossil fuels, a new answer may be emerging: underwater kites. A new research program directed by David Olinger, PhD, associate professor of mechanical engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), has...
 
Listen Up: Oysters May Use Sound To Select A Home; 'Like Living In A Busy Urban Area'
Raleigh, North Carolina - Oct 30, 2013 23:09 EST

Oysters begin their lives as tiny drifters, but when they mature they settle on reefs. New research from North Carolina State University shows that the sounds of the reef may attract the young oysters, helping them locate their permanent home. Larval...
 
Study: Coral Reefs May Be Able To Adapt To Moderate Climate Change, May Last 'Through The End Of This Century'
Silver Spring, Maryland - Oct 29, 2013 23:40 EST

Coral reefs may be able to adapt to moderate climate warming, improving their chance of surviving through the end of this century, if there are large reductions in carbon dioxide emissions, according to a study funded by NOAA and researched...
 
Study: Unprecedented Warmth In Arctic Ocean; 'Outside Any Kind Of Known Natural Variability'
Boulder, Colorado - Oct 24, 2013 20:21 EST

Average summer temperatures in the Eastern Canadian Arctic during the last 100 years are higher now than during any century in the past 44,000 years and perhaps as long ago as 120,000 years, says a new University of Colorado Boulder...
 
Seeing In The Dark: New Research Sheds Light On How Porpoises Hear In One Of The World's Busiest Rivers
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Oct 23, 2013 00:38 EST

The Yangtze finless porpoise, which inhabits the high-traffic waters near the Three Gorges Dam in China, is highly endangered, with only about 1,000 animals alive today. Scientists from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and their Chinese colleagues are using medical...
 
Study: All Ocean Systems Undermined By Climate Change By 2100; 'Everything' Impacted
San Diego, California - Oct 18, 2013 17:54 EST

An ambitious new study that includes Lisa Levin of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego describes the full chain of events by which ocean biogeochemical changes triggered by manmade greenhouse gas emissions may cascade through marine habitats and...
 
Researchers Find Water And Lava, But -- Curiously -- No Explosion; 'Kinder, Genter' Reaction
Buffalo, New York - Oct 10, 2013 16:56 EST

Rocky pillars dotting Iceland's Skaelingar valley were projectiles tossed into the fields by warring trolls. That, at least, is the tale that University at Buffalo geologist Tracy Gregg heard from a tour guide and local hiker when she visited the...
 
Genetics Used To Sort Out Poorly Known -- And Hunted -- Whale Species
New York, New York - Oct 3, 2013 20:57 EST

Saving the whales often means knowing—sometimes genetically—one group of whales from another, say researchers attempting to define populations of a medium-sized and poorly understood baleen whale that is sometimes targeted by Japan's scientific whaling program. In a new study, scientists...
 
Cold, Salty And Promiscuous -- Gene-Shuffling Microbes Dominate Antarctica's Deep Lake; 'There Is So Much Stuff In There'
Walnut Creek, California - Sep 30, 2013 20:50 EST

Sequestered in Antarctica's Vestfold Hills, Deep Lake became isolated from the ocean 3,500 years ago by the Antarctic continent rising, resulting in a saltwater ecosystem that remains liquid in extreme cold, and providing researchers a unique niche for studying the...
 
Scientists: Deep Sea Ecosystem May Take Decades To Recover From Deepwater Horizon Spill
Reno, Nevada - Sep 28, 2013 19:04 EST

The deep-sea soft-sediment ecosystem in the immediate area of the 2010's Deepwater Horizon well head blowout and subsequent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico will likely take decades to recover from the spill's impacts, according to a scientific paper...
 
Breathing Underwater: Researchers Uncover Evidence Of Microscopic Life In Oceanic Crust
East Boothbay, Maine - Sep 28, 2013 18:43 EST

Although long thought to be devoid of life, the bottom of the deep ocean is now known to harbor entire ecosystems teeming with microbes. Scientists have recently documented that oxygen is disappearing from seawater circulating through deep oceanic crust, a...
 
Research Reveals Bottom Side-Roll Feeding Techniques Of Tagged Humpback Whales
Durham, New Hampshire - Sep 26, 2013 21:07 EST

New NOAA-led research on tagged humpback whales in Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary reveals a variety of previously unknown feeding techniques along the seafloor. Rather than a single bottom feeding behavior, the whales show three distinct feeding approaches: simple side-rolls,...
 
Study: Urban Fish Masculinized By Hormone-Mimicking Chemicals
Davis, California - Sep 25, 2013 23:34 EST

It's a man's world for fish in a San Francisco Bay-Delta estuary. Silverside fish collected from an urban beach in Suisun Marsh were more masculinized, but with smaller and less healthy gonads, than were neighboring silversides swimming near a cattle ranch...
 
Scientists: Mantas, Devil Rays Butchered For Apothecary Trade Now Identifiable
Seattle, Washington - Sep 19, 2013 18:36 EST

Since dried filters from the mouths of filter-feeding rays hit apothecary shop menus in Asia – the thought being that eating ground-up filters will cleanse one's liver – there's been no way to know which of these gentle-natured rays...
 
Study: Stronger Winds Explain Puzzling Growth Of Sea Ice In Antarctica; 'The Ice Just Survives Longer'
Seatlle, Washington - Sep 18, 2013 17:56 EST

Much attention is paid to melting sea ice in the Arctic. But less clear is the situation on the other side of the planet. Despite warmer air and oceans, there's more sea ice in Antarctica now than in the 1970s...
 
Plankton Portal To Use Crowd-Sourcing To Classify Strange Oceanic Creatures; 'Human Eye' Needed
Miami, Florida - Sep 17, 2013 17:39 EST

Today, an online citizen-science project launches called "Plankton Portal" was created by researchers at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (RSMAS) in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Science...
 
Researchers: Viruses Associated With Coral Epidemic Of 'White Plague'
Corvallis, Oregon - Sep 13, 2013 18:08 EST

They call it the "white plague," and like its black counterpart from the Middle Ages, it conjures up visions of catastrophic death, with a cause that was at first uncertain even as it led to widespread destruction – on marine...
 
Unprecedented Rate And Scale Of Ocean Acidification Found In The Arctic; Melted Sea Ice 'Adds Fuel To Fire'
Tampa, Florida - Sep 13, 2013 17:54 EST

Acidification of the Arctic Ocean is occurring faster than projected according to new findings published in the journal PLoS One. The increase in rate is being blamed on rapidly melting sea ice, a process that may have important consequences for...
 
AC Or DC? 2 Newly Described Electric Fish From The Amazon Are Wired Differently
Ithaca, New York - Aug 28, 2013 20:55 EST

Much as human siblings can have vastly different personalities despite their similar resemblance and genetics, two closely related species of electric fish from the Amazon produce very different electric signals. These species, new to science, are described in the open...
 
Research: 'Zombie Fish' Can Reproduce Long After Death; 'Stored Sperm' A First For Vertebrates
Riverside, California - Aug 27, 2013 20:48 EST

Performing experiments in a river in Trinidad, a team of evolutionary biologists has found that male guppies continue to reproduce for at least ten months after they die, living on as stored sperm in females, who have much longer lifespans...
 
Crocodile Confession: Meat-Eating Predators Sometimes Consume Fruit; 'Appears Widespread'
New York, New York - Aug 22, 2013 17:53 EST

It turns out that alligators do not live on meat alone. Neither do Nile crocodiles. A new study led by the Wildlife Conservation Society says that the American alligator and a dozen other crocodile species enjoy an occasional taste of...
 
Torpedo Shot From USS Iowa In 1899 Surfaces; 'Several Museums Are Interested'
Washington, D.C. - Aug 20, 2013 19:16 EST

Naval History and Heritage Command's (NHHC) Underwater Archeology Branch (UAB) dove into the history of a recently-discovered late-19th century No. 24 Howell Torpedo, Aug. 9, and they scored a direct hit. "We started looking through SECNAV (Secretary of the Navy)...
 
Researchers: Dolphins Keep Lifelong Social Memories, Longest In A Non-Human Species; 'Consistent With Humans'
Chicago, Illinois - Aug 8, 2013 17:03 EST

Dolphins can recognize their old tank mates' whistles after being separated for more than 20 years — the longest social memory ever recorded for a non-human species. The remarkable memory feat is another indication that dolphins have a level of cognitive...
 
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