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For Fish, Fear Smells Like Sugar; Mysterious 'Schreckstoff' Puzzle Solved After 70 Years
Cambridge, Massachusetts - Feb 23, 2012 19:02 EST

When one fish gets injured, the rest of the school takes off in fear, tipped off by a mysterious substance known as "Schreckstoff" (meaning "scary stuff" in German). Now, researchers reporting online on February 23 in the Cell Press journal...
 
Researchers: Even In Winter, Life Persists In Arctic Seas; 'The Zooplankton Community Seemed To Be Quite Active'
Arlington, Virginia - Feb 22, 2012 18:47 EST

Despite brutal cold and lingering darkness, life in the frigid waters off Alaska does not grind to a halt in the winter as scientists previously suspected. According to preliminary results from a National Science Foundation- (NSF) funded research cruise, microscopic...
 
Research: Humans Greater Threat To Groundwater Than 'Climate Change'
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan - Feb 22, 2012 18:25 EST

Human activity is likely a greater threat to coastal groundwater used for drinking water supplies than rising sea levels from climate change, according to a study conducted by geoscientists from the University of Saskatchewan and McGill University in Montreal. Grant Ferguson...
 
Is It Radioactive? Tsunami Disaster Debris Arriving On U.S. Shores From Japan Bring Questions
Corvallis, Oregon - Feb 22, 2012 18:20 EST

The first anniversary is approaching of the March, 2011, earthquake and tsunami that devastated Fukushima, Japan, and later this year debris from that event should begin to wash up on U.S. shores – and one question many have asked is...
 
Climate Change Study Warns Against One-Off Experiments; Warming May Produce More Copepods
Aberdeen, Scotland - Feb 21, 2012 19:35 EST

Scientists examined how different climate change scenarios affected one of the most important organisms in our ocean - tiny marine crustaceans called copepods, which are the preferred prey of cod and herring larvae. Understanding how copepods are affected by climate change...
 
Researchers Use Deep-Ocean 'Gliders' To Track A Current From The Tasman Sea To The Indian Ocean
Sydney, Australia - Feb 21, 2012 18:57 EST

Deployed in 2010 and 2011, the gliders have also profiled a 200-meter tall wall of water at the core of long-lived ocean eddies formed from the East Australian Current. The study, by University of Technology Sydney and CSIRO oceanographers, revealed the...
 
Researchers: Iconic Marine Mammals Are 'Swimming In Sick Seas' Of Terrestrial Pathogens
Vancouver, Canada - Feb 20, 2012 19:30 EST

Parasites and pathogens infecting humans, pets and farm animals are increasingly being detected in marine mammals such as sea otters, porpoises, harbor seals and killer whales along the Pacific coast of the U.S. and Canada, and better surveillance is required...
 
Staghorn Coral Transplanted On Florida Reef; 'Northernmost Location On The Planet'
Hollywood, California - Feb 18, 2012 18:42 EST

In a delicate operation at sea, healthy staghorn coral were transplanted Friday to a threatened reef off the Broward County coast by researchers at Nova Southeastern University's Oceanographic Center and its internal National Coral Reef Institute (NCRI). "This is the northernmost...
 
Scientists: Mother Of Pearl Tells A Tale Of Ocean Temperature, Depth
Madison, Wisconsin - Feb 16, 2012 18:48 EST

Nacre -- or mother of pearl, scientists and artisans know, is one of nature's amazing utilitarian materials. Produced by a multitude of mollusk species, nacre is widely used in jewelry and art. It is inlaid into musical instruments, furniture and...
 
Marine Scientists Awarded Grant To Study Ciguatera Fish Poisoning; 'There's A Lot We Don't Know'
Austin, Texas - Feb 15, 2012 20:44 EST

Marine scientist Deana Erdner is part of an international team of researchers awarded an anticipated five-year, $4 million grant to study the causes of ciguatera fish poisoning, the most common form of algal toxin-induced seafood poisoning in the world. The study...
 
Researchers: Ocean Microbe Communities Changing, But Long-Term Environmental Impact Is Unclear
Corvallis, Oregon - Feb 14, 2012 17:58 EST

As oceans warm due to climate change, water layers will mix less and affect the microbes and plankton that pump carbon out of the atmosphere – but researchers say it's still unclear whether these processes will further increase global warming...
 
Florida Keys 'Wreck Trek' Program's Prize Winners Announced
Key West, Florida - Feb 14, 2012 00:25 EST

Several thousand divers visit the Florida Keys annually to dive the island chain's shipwreck trail. More than 100 of them completed a series of nine wreck dives to be eligible to win one of several dive and lodging packages and...
 
Scientists: Big Fish Shelter Choice Could Have Impact On Ability To Survive Climate Change
Townsville, Queensland - Feb 13, 2012 23:45 EST

When it comes to choosing a place to hang out, big reef fish like coral trout, snappers and sweetlips have strong architectural preferences. The choices big fish make on where to shelter could have a major influence on their ability to...
 
'Anti-Freeze' Fish Of Antarctica Threatened By Climate Change; 'So Well Adapted To Water At Freezing Temperatures'
New Haven, Connecticut - Feb 13, 2012 23:16 EST

A Yale-led study of the evolutionary history of Antarctic fish and their "anti-freeze" proteins illustrates how tens of millions of years ago a lineage of fish adapted to newly formed polar conditions – and how today they are endangered by...
 
Engineers Find Inspiration For New Materials In Piranha-Proof Armor; 'We're Reaching The Limit With Synthetic Materials'
San Diego, California - Feb 11, 2012 00:56 EST

It's a matchup worthy of a late-night cable movie: put a school of starving piranha and a 300-pound fish together, and who comes out the winner? The surprising answer—given the notorious guillotine-like bite of the piranha—is Brazil's massive Arapaima fish. The...
 
Research: Amazing Skin 'Denticles' Gives Sharks A Push
Cambridge, Massachusetts - Feb 9, 2012 17:16 EST

Streamlined sharks are legendary for their effortless swimming. George Lauder from Harvard University explains that the fish have long inspired human engineers, but more recently attention has focused on how the fish's remarkable skin boosts swimming. Coated in razor sharp...
 
Study: Ocean Warming Causes Elephant Seals To Dive Deeper; 'Food In The Sea Is Unevenly Distributed'
Berlin, Germany - Feb 9, 2012 15:58 EST

Global warming is having an effect on the dive behavior and search for food of southern elephant seals. Researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in the Helmholtz Association cooperating in a joint study with biologists...
 
Study: Ocean Warming Causes Elephant Seals To Dive Deeper; 'Food In The Sea Is Unevenly Distributed'
Berlin, Germany - Feb 9, 2012 15:54 EST

Global warming is having an effect on the dive behavior and search for food of southern elephant seals. Researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in the Helmholtz Association cooperating in a joint study with biologists...
 
Study: Global Glaciers, Ice Caps, Shedding Billions Of Tons Of Mass Annually; Sea Rising 0.4 Millimeters Annually
Boulder, Colorado - Feb 8, 2012 18:35 EST

Earth's glaciers and ice caps outside of the regions of Greenland and Antarctica are shedding roughly 150 billion tons of ice annually, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder. The research effort is the first...
 
Petition Seeks International Investigation Of Canada's Farmed Fish Operations, Protections For Wild Salmon
San Francisco, California - Feb 7, 2012 20:24 EST

Conservation, fishing and native groups in Canada and the United States filed a formal petition (pdf) today requesting an international investigation into Canada's failure to protect wild salmon in British Columbia from disease and parasites in industrial fish feedlots. The...
 
Report: 2011 Shark Attacks Remain Steady, Worldwide Deaths Highest Since 1993; 'Who's Killing Who?'
Gainsville, Florida - Feb 7, 2012 14:49 EST

Shark attacks in the U.S. declined in 2011, but worldwide fatalities reached a two-decade high, according to the University of Florida's International Shark Attack File report released today. While the U.S. and Florida saw a five-year downturn in the number of...
 
Scientists To Install First Real-Time Seafloor Earthquake Observatory At Cascadia Fault; 'You Have To Have Instruments Out There'
Wood Hole, Massachusetts - Feb 3, 2012 18:47 EST

damage Portland, Tacoma, Seattle, and Victoria, British Columbia, and generate a large tsunami. Yet there are currently no instruments installed offshore, directly above the fault, for measuring the strain that is currently building up along the fault. But a recent $1...
 
Scottish Seal Killings Can And Must End Say Campaigners; 'Indelible Stain'
Lewes, East Sussex - Feb 2, 2012 18:50 EST

The Scottish Government has just reported that a total of 362 seals were shot in the first nine months of 2011 under its new 'Seal Licence' scheme, introduced at the beginning of the year. In 2012, 58 licenses have been...
 
Study Finds Southern Indian Ocean Humpbacks Singing Different Tunes
New York, New York - Feb 2, 2012 17:41 EST

A recently published study by the Wildlife Conservation Society and others reveals that humpback whales on both sides of the southern Indian Ocean are singing different tunes, unusual since humpbacks in the same ocean basin usually all sing very similar...
 
Scientists: 'No Evidence' To Support 'Media' And 'Climate Change' Reports On Increasing Jellyfish Populations
Santa Barbara, California - Feb 1, 2012 20:00 EST

Blooms, or proliferation, of jellyfish have shown a substantial, visible impact on coastal populations — clogged nets for fishermen, stinging waters for tourists, even choked intake lines for power plants — and recent media reports have created a perception that...
 
Professor Uses New Supercomputer Model To Accurately Predict 2012 Seasonal Climate Patterns
Tokyo, Japan - Feb 1, 2012 19:52 EST

Professor Toshio Yamagata, Dean of University of Tokyo Graduate School of Science and Head of the Application Laboratory of Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), has announced seasonal climate predictions for 2012 which are strongly influenced by only...
 
Indonesian Shark Fishing Communities To Help In Sustainability Study
Perth, Western Australia - Jan 30, 2012 20:47 EST

A Murdoch University PhD student will spend a year living among Indonesian shark fishermen to investigate their impact on shark populations and the effects of conservation efforts on fishing communities. Vanessa Jaiteh hopes her project, beginning at the end of this...
 
NOAA Study To Satellite Tag Killer Whales Angers Canadian Conservationists; 'Risk Isn't Worth It'
Sidney, British Columbia - Jan 29, 2012 19:43 EST

A plan to tag the endangered southern resident killer whales that ply both sides of the international boundary between Canada and the USA is meeting with growing opposition, now on the Canadian side of the border. Despite efforts between Canada...
 
What Do Killer Whales Eat In The Arctic? 'Whatever They Can Catch'
London, United Kingdom - Jan 29, 2012 19:26 EST

Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are the top marine predator, wherever they are found, and seem to eat everything from schools of small fish to large baleen whales, over twice their own size. The increase in hunting territories available to killer...
 
Federal Judge Allows Nonhuman Rights Project To Appear As Friend Of The Court In Peta V. Seaworld
Coral Springs, Florida - Jan 27, 2012 19:32 EST

Over the objections of both PETA and SeaWorld, U.S. District Court Judge Jeffrey T. Miller granted a request by the Nonhuman Rights Project (NhRP) to appear as an amicus curiae, or "Friend of the Court," in the case PETA filed...
 
Group Sues Us Navy For Blasting Marine Mammals With Harmful Sonar, 'Deafening Noises'
San Francisco, California - Jan 26, 2012 21:14 EST

A coalition of conservation and American Indian groups today sued the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for failing to protect thousands of whales, dolphins, porpoises, seals, and sea lions from U.S. Navy warfare training exercises along the coasts of California,...
 
Scientist Detecting Detrimental Change In Coral Reefs With 'Temporal Texture Monitoring'
Greenbelt, Maryland - Jan 26, 2012 21:03 EST

Over dinner on R.V. Calypso while anchored on the lee side of Glover's Reef in Belize, Jacques Cousteau told Phil Dustan that he suspected humans were having a negative impact on coral reefs. Dustan—a young ocean ecologist who had worked...
 
Ecologists Among The First To Record And Study Deep-Sea Fish Noises; 'A Wealth Of Biological Sounds'
Amherst, Massachusetts - Jan 26, 2012 20:49 EST

University of Massachusetts Amherst fish biologists have published one of the first studies of deep-sea fish sounds in more than 50 years, collected from the sea floor about 2,237 feet (682 meters) below the North Atlantic. With recording technology now...
 
Life Beyond Earth? Underwater Caves In Bahamas Could Give Clues
Galveston, Texas - Jan 26, 2012 20:18 EST

Discoveries made in some underwater caves by Texas &M University at Galveston researchers in the Bahamas could provide clues about how ocean life formed on Earth millions of years ago, and perhaps give hints of what types of marine life...
 
NOAA Unveils Improved Way To Estimate Saltwater Recreational Fishing; 'Can Only Be A Plus'
Silver Spring, Maryland - Jan 25, 2012 18:07 EST

NOAA today announced it has begun to use an improved method to estimate the amount of fish caught by saltwater anglers, which will allow rules that fishermen follow to be based on more accurate information. The method is part of an...
 
Researchers: Complex Relationship Between Fish, Coral Beneficial To Both
Townsville, Queensland - Jan 24, 2012 22:01 EST

Lessons from tens of millions of years ago are pointing to new ways to save and protect today's coral reefs and their myriad of beautiful and many-hued fishes at a time of huge change in the Earth's systems. The complex relationship...
 
Life Discovered On Dead Hydrothermal Vents; 'The Next Thing Is To Go Subterranean'
Los Angeles, California - Jan 24, 2012 20:33 EST

Scientists at USC have uncovered evidence that even when hydrothermal sea vents go dormant and their blistering warmth turns to frigid cold, life goes on. Or rather, it is replaced. A team led by USC microbiologist Katrina Edwards found that the...
 
Dive Legend Neal Watson Re-Elected President Of The Bahamas Diving Association
The Bahamas - Jan 24, 2012 20:11 EST

Dive legend and businessman Neal Watson has been re-elected for another two-year term as president of the Bahamas Diving Association. Stuart Cove, owner of Stuart Cove's Dive Bahamas in Nassau and Stuart Cove's Tiger Beach Safaris on Grand Bahama...
 
Advantages Of Living In The Dark: Scientists Document The Multiple Evolution Events Of 'Blind' Cavefish
New York, New York - Jan 23, 2012 18:26 EST

Blind Mexican cavefish (Astyanax mexicanus) have not only lost their sight, but have adapted to perpetual darkness by also losing their pigment (albinism) and having altered sleep patterns. Research led by New York University biologists shows that the cavefish are...
 
Scientists: Unprecedented, Man-Made Trends In Ocean's Acidity; 'Hundred Times Greater Than The Natural Rate Of Change'
Oahu, Hawaii - Jan 22, 2012 20:24 EST

Nearly one-third of CO2 emissions due to human activities enters the world's oceans. By reacting with seawater, CO2 increases the water's acidity, which may significantly reduce the calcification rate of such marine organisms as corals and mollusks. The extent to...
 


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