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New Species Of Fish Discovered In Sweden: Reticulated Dragonet
Gothenburg, Sweden - May 14, 2012 20:45 EST

Reticulated dragonet have been found in Väderöarna – "Weather Islands" – off the west coast of Sweden. It is not often that a new species of fish is discovered in Sweden. Lars-Ove Loo is the underwater photographer who has captured the...
 
Largest Reef Restoration Project Under Way In Florida And The U.S. Virgin Islands
Big Pine Key, Florida - May 14, 2012 19:50 EST

Scientists are transplanting up to 10,000 nursery-grown staghorn and elkhorn corals to degraded reefs in Florida and the U.S. Virgin Islands in the largest marine restoration project of its kind. Experts hope that the transplanted young corals will thrive and...
 
Annual NOAA Report Shows A Record Number Of Fisheries Rebuilt In The United States
Silver Spring, Maryland - May 14, 2012 19:08 EST

A record six fish populations were declared rebuilt to healthy levels in 2011, bringing the number of rebuilt U.S. marine fish populations in the last 11 years to 27, according to a report to Congress out today from NOAA's Fisheries...
 
First Satellite Tag Study For Manta Rays Reveals Habits And Hidden Journeys Of Ocean Giants
New York, New York - May 11, 2012 20:07 EST

Using the latest satellite tracking technology, conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the University of Exeter (UK), and the Government of Mexico have completed a ground-breaking study on a mysterious ocean giant: the manta ray. The research team has produced...
 
Research: A Push From The Mississippi Kept Deepwater Horizon Oil Slick Off Shore
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - May 10, 2012 20:04 EST

When the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded April 20, 2010, residents feared that their Gulf of Mexico shores would be inundated with oil. And while many wetland habitats and wildlife were oiled during the three-month leak, the environmental damage to...
 
Research: Plastic Trash Altering Ocean Habitats; 'Garbage Patches' Could Have Ecosystem-Wide Consequences
San Diego, California - May 9, 2012 19:13 EST

A 100-fold upsurge in human-produced plastic garbage in the ocean is altering habitats in the marine environment, according to a new study led by a graduate student researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. In 2009 an ambitious...
 
Research: Pufferfish At The 'Beak' Of Evolution; 'A Very Alternative, And Unique, Dentition'
Western Bank, Sheffield - May 8, 2012 20:23 EST

New research focusing on tooth development in the deadly fish -unchanged through evolution - shows that after the first generation of teeth the program for continued tooth replacement modifies to form a distinctive and unusual `parrot like´ beak. The study, which...
 
Campaigners Condemn Scottish Government's Complacency As Seven Months Of Seal Killings Remain Unreported
Lewes, East Sussex - May 8, 2012 19:03 EST

The Seal Protection Action Group has today condemned the failure of the Scottish Government to release figures on the number of seals shot over the past seven months under its new Seal License Scheme, introduced at the beginning of 2010....
 
Researchers: Whales May Turn Down Their Hearing Sensitivity When Warned Of An Impending Loud Noise
Tokyo,Japan - May 8, 2012 18:10 EST

Toothed whales navigate through sometimes dark and murky waters by emitting clicks and then interpreting the pattern of sound that bounces back. The animals' hearing can pick up faint echoes, but that sensitivity can be a liability around loud noises....
 
Scientists: 'Dolphin Speaker' To Enhance Study Of Dolphin Vocalizations And Acoustics
Tokyo, Japan - May 8, 2012 18:00 EST

Dolphins rely on the combination of a variety of vocalizations and vastly better acoustic abilities than humans to communicate with each other or to detect their surroundings and prey in the dark sea. To gain new insights into how dolphins...
 
Researchers: GPS-equipped Commercial Ships Could Become 'Network Of Accurate Tsunami Sensors'
Manoa, Hawaii - May 7, 2012 20:10 EST

Commercial ships travel across most of the globe and could provide better warnings for potentially deadly tsunamis, according to a study published May 5 by scientists at the University of Hawaii – Manoa (UHM) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...
 
Study: Greenland Glacier Speed Slower Than Expected, Lessening Predicted Increase In Sea Levels
Seattle, Washington - May 3, 2012 20:27 EST

Changes in the speed that ice travels in more than 200 outlet glaciers indicates that Greenland's contribution to rising sea level in the 21st century might be significantly less than the upper limits some scientists thought possible, a new study...
 
Canadian Scientists Uncover Ancient Killer Coelacanth; 'Overturns The Age Old Image Of Coelacanths'
Deerfield, Illinois - May 2, 2012 18:41 EST

Coelacanths are iconic fishes, well-known as 'living fossils.' The group was thought to have died out with the dinosaurs until a living one was caught in 1938 off the coast of South Africa, sending shock waves through the scientific world....
 
Study: Marine Food Chain Becomes Clearer With New Revelations About Prey 'Patchiness'
Corvallis, Oregon - May 2, 2012 18:22 EST

A new study has found that each step of the marine food chain is clearly controlled by the trophic level below it – and the driving factor influencing that relationship is not the abundance of prey, but how that prey...
 
Old Maps And Dead Clams Help Solve Coastal Boulder Mystery; 'Moved By Storm Waves'
Chicago, Illinois - May 1, 2012 21:59 EST

Perched atop the sheer coastal cliffs of Ireland's Aran Islands, ridges of giant boulders have puzzled geologists for years. What forces could have torn these rocks from the cliff edges high above sea level and deposited them far inland? While...
 
Scientists Provide First Large-Scale Estimate Of Reef Shark Losses In The Pacific Ocean
Honolulu, Hawaii - Apr 27, 2012 20:05 EST

Many shark populations have plummeted in the past three decades as a result of excessive harvesting – for their fins, as an incidental catch of fisheries targeting other species, and in recreational fisheries. This is particularly true for oceanic species....
 
Researchers: Ocean Salinity Change Detected; Wet To Get Wetter, Dry To Get Drier
Clayton South, Victoria - Apr 26, 2012 21:08 EST

A clear change in salinity has been detected in the world's oceans, signaling shifts and an acceleration in the global rainfall and evaporation cycle. In a paper published today in the journal Science, Australian scientists from CSIRO and the Lawrence Livermore...
 
Scientists: Glowing Belly Helps Tiny Shark Hide From Predators
Louvain, Belgium - Apr 26, 2012 20:43 EST

Some sharks deserve a blood curdling reputation, but not the diminutive smalleye pygmy shark (Squaliolus aliae). Reaching a maximum length of only 22cm, the tiny animals are more likely to be on someone else's menu. Silhouetted against weak light penetrating...
 
Rise In Asian Tiger Shrimp Sightings Prompts Scientific Look At Invasion Concerns
Silver Spring, Maryland - Apr 26, 2012 19:11 EST

The recent rise in sightings of non-native Asian tiger shrimp off the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts has government scientists working to determine the cause of the increase and the possible consequences for native fish and seafood in...
 
Research: It's The Bowl That Makes Goldfish Stupid; Fish Brains Adjust To Meet Environmental Needs
Helsinki, Finland - Apr 25, 2012 21:30 EST

A goldfish in a bowl is a stock allegory for stupidity we know for example from Donald Duck. Recent brain research supports this assumption. But it is not the fish that is stupid as such, it is the bowl that...
 
Study: Wind Pushes Plastics Deeper Into Oceans, Driving Trash Estimates Up
Seattle, Washington - Apr 25, 2012 21:04 EST

While working on a research sailboat gliding over glassy seas in the Pacific Ocean, oceanographer Giora Proskurowski noticed something new: The water was littered with confetti-size pieces of plastic debris, until the moment the wind picked up and most of...
 
Study: Warm Ocean Currents Cause Majority Of Ice Loss From Antarctica; 'We See A Clear Pattern'
British Antarctic Survey, Antarctica - Apr 25, 2012 21:00 EST

Reporting this week (Thursday 26 April) in the journal Nature, an international team of scientists led by British Antarctic Survey (BAS) has established that warm ocean currents are the dominant cause of recent ice loss from Antarctica. New techniques have...
 
Researchers: Shark Repellents Work Best If Targeted Against Specific Species
Perth, Australia - Apr 24, 2012 20:36 EST

Shark repellents may work best if they target specific species rather than try to deter all types of sharks, say scientists from the Oceans Institute at The University of Western Australia. Their findings are among six papers published by Oceans Institute...
 
Geophysicists Employ Novel Method To Identify Sources Of Global Sea Level Rise
Toronto, Ontario - Apr 24, 2012 19:47 EST

As the Earth's climate warms, a melting ice sheet produces a distinct and highly non-uniform pattern of sea-level change, with sea level falling close to the melting ice sheet and rising progressively farther away. The pattern for each ice sheet...
 
Research: Fish Larvae Find The Reef By Orienting, The Earlier The Better
Miami, Florida - Apr 23, 2012 21:25 EST

The behavior of marine larvae is central to fully understanding and modeling the pelagic (open ocean) stage for many coastal organisms. For the first time, a numerical study conducted by the University of Miami (UM) incorporates horizontal larval fish navigation...
 
Lawsuit Seeks Protections For Sea Turtles, Polar Bears, Other Rare Wildlife From Oil-Spill Dispersants
San Francisco, California - Apr 18, 2012 20:02 EST

Conservation groups sued the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Coast Guard today for authorizing toxic oil dispersants without ensuring that these chemicals would not harm endangered species or their habitats. The groups want the EPA to immediately study the...
 
Lawsuit Launched To Protect Habitat For Florida's Loggerhead Sea Turtles; 'We Have To Save The Places They Live'
San Francisco, California - Apr 17, 2012 21:05 EST

The Center for Biological Diversity and Turtle Island Restoration Network (seaturtles.org) filed a formal notice of intent to sue the Obama administration today seeking to protect critical habitat for imperiled loggerhead sea turtles on Florida's nesting beaches and marine waters...
 
Auditory Fats: Study Amplifies Understanding Of Hearing In Baleen Whales
Woods Hole, Massachusetts - Apr 17, 2012 20:38 EST

For decades, scientists have known that dolphins and other toothed whales have specialized fats associated with their jaws, which efficiently convey sound waves from the ocean to their ears. But until now, the hearing systems of their toothless grazing cousins,...
 
Scooter: Underwater Grand Prix Racers To Circle Vandenberg Off Key West, Florida
Key West, Florida - Apr 17, 2012 20:01 EST

The world’s second-largest ship ever sunk as an artificial reef is to become an underwater racetrack during the third annual Vandenberg Underwater Grand Prix, set for Friday through Sunday, May 18-20. Participants using diver-propulsion vehicles are to race around the...
 
Study: Manatee Hearing Good Despite Background Noise
Sarasota, Florida - Apr 12, 2012 19:31 EST

A new study on manatee hearing by Mote Marine Laboratory and collaborators shows that these marine mammals can sense a wide range of pitches despite loud background noise. The study, published today in the peer-reviewed Journal of Experimental Biology, demonstrates...
 
Researchers: Ocean Acidification Linked To Larval Oyster Failure; Hatcheries 'Non-Economically Viable'
Corvallis, Oregon - Apr 11, 2012 20:56 EST

Researchers at Oregon State University have definitively linked an increase in ocean acidification to the collapse of oyster seed production at a commercial oyster hatchery in Oregon, where larval growth had declined to a level considered by the owners to...
 
It's In The Algae: Study Shows Adaptive Capacity Of Reef Corals To 'Climate Change' May Be Widespread
Miami, Florida - Apr 11, 2012 20:52 EST

A new study by scientists at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science suggests that many species of reef-building corals may be able to adapt to warming waters by relying on their closest aquatic partners -...
 
Oceanographer Leading Effort To Enlist Commercial Ships To Collect Ocean Data
Kingston, Rhode island - Apr 5, 2012 17:57 EST

A University of Rhode Island oceanographer is leading an effort to partner with the global shipping industry to systematically collect detailed data about the world's oceans using equipment installed on commercial vessels. H. Thomas Rossby, a professor at the Graduate School...
 
New iPad, iPhone App Helps Mariners Avoid Endangered Right Whales
Silver Spring, Maryland - Apr 4, 2012 18:57 EST

Mariners along the U.S. east coast can now download a new iPad and iPhone application that warns them when they enter areas of high risk of collision with critically endangered North Atlantic right whales. The free Whale Alert app provides...
 
Research: Baltic Gray Seals Consume As Much Fish As The Fishing Industry Catches; 'Competition'
Gothenburg, Sweden - Apr 2, 2012 19:49 EST

The grey seals in the Baltic Sea compete for fish with the fishing industry. The seals locally eat about the same quantities of cod, common whitefish, salmon, sea trout and eel as those taken by fishermen. This is the conclusion...
 
Expert Task Force Recommends Halving Global Fishing For Crucial Prey Species; 'Small But Significant'
Washington, D.C. - Apr 2, 2012 19:33 EST

Fishing for herring, anchovy, and other "forage fish" in general should be cut in half globally to account for their critical role as food for larger species, recommends an expert group of marine scientists in a report released today. The...
 
Study: Ocean Temperatures On Upward Trend Over Last 100 Years
San Diego, California - Apr 1, 2012 17:16 EST

A new study contrasting ocean temperature readings of the 1870s with temperatures of the modern seas reveals an upward trend of global ocean warming spanning at least 100 years. The research led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego...
 
Some Corals Like It Hot: Scientists Discover Heat Stress May Help Coral Reefs Survive 'Climate Change'
Vancouver, British Columbia - Apr 1, 2012 17:13 EST

A team of international scientists working in the central Pacific have discovered that coral which has survived heat stress in the past is more likely to survive it in the future. The study, published today in the journal PLoS ONE, paves...
 
Study: Declines In Caribbean Coral Reefs Pre-Date Damage Resulting From 'Climate Change'
San Diego, California - Apr 1, 2012 17:10 EST

The decline of Caribbean coral reefs has been linked to the recent effects of human-induced climate change. However, new research led by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego suggests an even earlier cause. The bad news...
 
Group: National Geographic's New TV Show 'Wicked Tuna' Trivializes Plight Of Disappearing Bluefin Tuna
San Francisco, California - Mar 30, 2012 18:41 EST

A new National Geographic Channel show, Wicked Tuna, focuses on a group of fishermen trying to catch one of ocean's most majestic and imperiled fish, the bluefin tuna. The program comes at a time when key fisheries for bluefin tuna...
 


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