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NOAA: Use Of Lethal Force To Stop Protected Sea Lions From Eating Protected Salmon Has Been Approved
Silver Spring, Maryland - Mar 16, 2012 19:35 EST

NOAA's Fisheries Service said today it was authorizing Idaho, Oregon and Washington to permanently remove the specific California sea lions eating the imperiled salmon and steelhead that congregate below Bonneville Dam as they head up the Columbia River to spawn....
 
Giant Squids' Giant Eyes: The Better To See Hungry Whales With; 'Eyes Are Expensive To Build And Maintain'
Lund, Scania - Mar 16, 2012 19:29 EST

It's no surprise that giant and colossal squid are big, but it's their eyes that are the real standouts when it comes to size, with diameters measuring two or three times that of any other animal. Now, researchers reporting online...
 
Clash Of The Crayfish: Why The Americans Are Winning
Leeds, U.K. - Mar 15, 2012 20:29 EST

Aggressive American signal crayfish are threatening Yorkshire's native white-clawed crayfish populations because they have better resistance to parasites and are less fussy about what they eat. The native crayfish suffers from two parasites; plague, which is carried by the American...
 
Researchers Find Link Between Iron And Biological Productivity Of Ancient Pacific Ocean
Boston, Massachusetts - Mar 15, 2012 19:55 EST

A team of researchers has just published a new paper, lead authored by Boston University Professor of Earth Sciences Richard W. Murray, that provides compelling evidence from marine sediment that supports the theory that iron in the Earth's oceans has...
 
New Study Lowers Estimate Of Ancient Sea-Level Rise: 20 To 43 Feet
New York, New York - Mar 14, 2012 20:07 EST

The seas are creeping higher as the planet warms. But how high will they go? Projections for the year 2100 range from inches to several feet, or more. The sub-tropical islands of Bermuda and the Bahamas contain important sites where...
 
Suba: New 'Intelligent' BCD Aims To Automatically Stabilize Divers, Eliminate The Bends
Lausanne, Switzerland - Mar 13, 2012 10:36 EST

The Suba system aims to become to diving what the automatic pilot is to flying. Developed by a student from EPFL, it will be released to the market by his start-up company: Pandora Underwater Equipment, starting from April 2012. When a...
 
First As Researchers Find Fish Use Sounds, Smells And Visual Cues To Navigate Reefs
Bristol, U.K - Mar 12, 2012 20:16 EST

Young coral reef fish use sounds, smells and visual cues to find their nursery grounds, according to new research from the University of Bristol, published today in Ecology. Ever had to find your friend in a crowd? Imagine at...
 
Scientists Document First Consumption Of Abundant Life Form, Archaea
Corvalis, Oregon - Mar 12, 2012 18:51 EST

A team of scientists has documented for the first time that animals can and do consume Archaea a type of single-celled microorganism thought to be among the most abundant life forms on Earth. Archaea that consume the greenhouse gas methane...
 
Research: Chumming, Ecotourism Does Not Impact Shark Behavior
Miami, Florida - Mar 9, 2012 19:31 EST

Ecotourism activities that use food to attract and concentrate wildlife for viewing have become a controversial topic in ecological studies. This debate is best exemplified by the shark dive tourism industry, a highly lucrative and booming global market. Use of...
 
Gannet Study Reveals Perils Of High-Speed Diving; Fatal Collisions Injuries Common
Palmerston North, New Zealand - Mar 9, 2012 19:14 EST

Gannets may be among the fastest and most agile seabird hunters around, but they risk dying of fatal neck and head injuries from accidental collisions in the water when diving for fish at breakneck speeds, a Massey biology researcher has...
 
'Chum Cam' Underwater Video Survey Shows That Reef Sharks Thrive In Marine Reserves
Stony Brook, New York - Mar 8, 2012 22:43 EST

A team of scientists, led by the Institute for Ocean Conservation Science at Stony Brook University, used video cameras to count Caribbean reef sharks (Carcharhinus perezi) inside and outside marine reserves on the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef in the Caribbean Sea....
 
Hydrothermal Seep: Hot Meets Cold At New Deep-Sea Ecosystem; 'We Need To Re-Think The Boundary'
La Jolla, California - Mar 8, 2012 15:22 EST

Decades ago, marine scientists made a startling discovery in the deep sea. They found environments known as hydrothermal vents, where hot water surges from the seafloor and life thrives without sunlight. Then they found equally unique, sunless habitats in cold areas...
 
Deadly Expansion Of Shark, Swordfish Fishery Planned For California Sea Turtle Protected Area
Sacramento, California - Mar 6, 2012 21:15 EST

The federal Pacific Fishery Management Council voted on Saturday to pursue the expansion of California's devastating drift gillnet fishery for swordfish and sharks into an area that is currently off-limits to that fishing to protect critically endangered Pacific leatherback sea...
 
Florida Keys Coral Expert Ken Nedimyer Named CNN Hero; 'I Had To Pinch Myself'
Florida Keys, Florida - Mar 2, 2012 19:39 EST

A Florida Keys coral restoration expert has been named a CNN Hero for his pioneering efforts to develop techniques to preserve coral reefs and motivate public support for a cause that attracts environmentally conscious vacationers. The honor for Ken Nedimyer, founder...
 
Study: Law That Regulates Shark Fishery Is Too Liberal; 'It Does Not Prevent Waste Or Overfishing'
Vancouver, British Columbia - Mar 2, 2012 19:30 EST

Shark fins are worth more than other parts of the shark and are often removed from the body, which gets thrown back into the sea. To curtail this wasteful practice, many countries allow the fins to be landed detached from...
 
What Makes A Robot Fish Attractive? Hint: It's In The Moves
New York, New York - Mar 1, 2012 19:45 EST

Probing the largely unexplored question of what characteristics make a leader among schooling fish, researchers have discovered that by mimicking nature, a robotic fish can transform into a leader of live ones. Through a series of experiments, researchers from Polytechnic Institute...
 
Scientists: Diverse Catches Are Better For Fishery Ecosystems; 'Balanced Harvest'
Clayton, Victoria - Mar 1, 2012 19:26 EST

Fishing for a 'balanced harvest' can achieve productive fisheries as well as environmental conservation, an international scientific team reports today in the journal Science. In contrast, increasing fishing selectivity to catch a small group of species and sizes neither maximizes production...
 
Study: Ocean Acidification Rate May Be Unprecedented; Few Parallels In 300-Million-Yr Geologic Record
Palisades, New York - Mar 1, 2012 19:15 EST

More catastrophic events have shaken earth before, but perhaps not as quickly. The study finds two other times of potential ocean acidification: the extinctions triggered by massive volcanism at the end of the Permian and Triassic eras, about 252 million...
 
Study: Dust Linked To Increased Glacier Melting, Ocean Productivity; 'Absorbs Solar Radiation'
Miami, Florida - Mar 1, 2012 19:06 EST

A University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science-led study shows a link between large dust storms on Iceland and glacial melting. The dust is both accelerating glacial melting and contributing important nutrients to the surrounding North...
 
Unlocking The Secrets Of Sea Turtle Migration; 'Bermuda Is A Place Where Young Turtles Go To Grow Up'
St. Petersburg, Florida - Feb 29, 2012 18:45 EST

Sea turtles have long and complex lives; they can live into their 70s or 80s and they famously return to their birthplace to nest. But new research suggests this isn't the only big migration in a sea turtle's life. "We're starting...
 
Say Again: Blue Whale Behavior Affected By Man-Made Noise
San Diego, California - Feb 29, 2012 18:24 EST

Blue whale vocal behavior is affected by man-made noise, even when that noise does not overlap the frequencies the whales use for communication, according to new research published Feb. 29 in the open access journal PLoS ONE. The whales were...
 
Phosphorus And Groundwater: Scientists Establish Links Between Agricultural Use And Transport To Streams
Sacramento, California - Feb 29, 2012 17:49 EST

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey have, for the first time, demonstrated how aquifer composition can affect how excessive levels of phosphorous (an essential nutrient contained in fertilizers) can be carried from fertilized agricultural fields via groundwater to streams and...
 
Scientists: Plants, Nuts And Coastal Microalgae Support Bottom Fish In Hawaiian Submarine Canyons
Manoa, Hawaii - Feb 28, 2012 18:40 EST

Scientists from the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) at the University of Hawaii Manoa (UHM) and colleagues recently discovered that land-based plant material and coastal macroalgae indirectly support the increased abundances of bottom fish in...
 
Researchers: Sharks Blamed As Number Of Dead Sea Otters Recovered Hits High; 'Taste-Tests' Take Toll
Santa Cruz, California - Feb 24, 2012 19:24 EST

The California or southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) appears to be experiencing an unprecedented increase in mortality from attacks by sharks, according to federal and state scientists. Since 1968, biologists and veterinarians at the U.S. Geological Survey and California...
 
Researchers, Google Collaborate On 'Virtual' Exploration Of The Great Barrier Reef
Brisbane, Australia - Feb 24, 2012 18:37 EST

A pioneering scientific expedition that will document the health of coral on the Great Barrier Reef will be undertaken as a joint venture between global technology giant Google, the UQ Global Change Institute, not-for-profit organization Underwater Earth and insurance company...
 
Neurotoxins In Shark Fins: A Human Health Concern; 'It Is Likely Harmful To People'
Miami, Florida - Feb 23, 2012 19:23 EST

Sharks are among the most threatened of marine species worldwide due to unsustainable overfishing. They are primarily killed for their fins to fuel the growing demand for shark fin soup, which is an Asia delicacy. A new study by University...
 
For Fish, Fear Smells Like Sugar; Mysterious 'Schreckstoff' Puzzle Solved After 70 Years
Cambridge, Massachusetts - Feb 23, 2012 19:02 EST

When one fish gets injured, the rest of the school takes off in fear, tipped off by a mysterious substance known as "Schreckstoff" (meaning "scary stuff" in German). Now, researchers reporting online on February 23 in the Cell Press journal...
 
Researchers: Even In Winter, Life Persists In Arctic Seas; 'The Zooplankton Community Seemed To Be Quite Active'
Arlington, Virginia - Feb 22, 2012 18:47 EST

Despite brutal cold and lingering darkness, life in the frigid waters off Alaska does not grind to a halt in the winter as scientists previously suspected. According to preliminary results from a National Science Foundation- (NSF) funded research cruise, microscopic...
 
Research: Humans Greater Threat To Groundwater Than 'Climate Change'
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan - Feb 22, 2012 18:25 EST

Human activity is likely a greater threat to coastal groundwater used for drinking water supplies than rising sea levels from climate change, according to a study conducted by geoscientists from the University of Saskatchewan and McGill University in Montreal. Grant Ferguson...
 
Is It Radioactive? Tsunami Disaster Debris Arriving On U.S. Shores From Japan Bring Questions
Corvallis, Oregon - Feb 22, 2012 18:20 EST

The first anniversary is approaching of the March, 2011, earthquake and tsunami that devastated Fukushima, Japan, and later this year debris from that event should begin to wash up on U.S. shores and one question many have asked is...
 
Climate Change Study Warns Against One-Off Experiments; Warming May Produce More Copepods
Aberdeen, Scotland - Feb 21, 2012 19:35 EST

Scientists examined how different climate change scenarios affected one of the most important organisms in our ocean - tiny marine crustaceans called copepods, which are the preferred prey of cod and herring larvae. Understanding how copepods are affected by climate change...
 
Researchers Use Deep-Ocean 'Gliders' To Track A Current From The Tasman Sea To The Indian Ocean
Sydney, Australia - Feb 21, 2012 18:57 EST

Deployed in 2010 and 2011, the gliders have also profiled a 200-meter tall wall of water at the core of long-lived ocean eddies formed from the East Australian Current. The study, by University of Technology Sydney and CSIRO oceanographers, revealed the...
 
Researchers: Iconic Marine Mammals Are 'Swimming In Sick Seas' Of Terrestrial Pathogens
Vancouver, Canada - Feb 20, 2012 19:30 EST

Parasites and pathogens infecting humans, pets and farm animals are increasingly being detected in marine mammals such as sea otters, porpoises, harbor seals and killer whales along the Pacific coast of the U.S. and Canada, and better surveillance is required...
 
Staghorn Coral Transplanted On Florida Reef; 'Northernmost Location On The Planet'
Hollywood, California - Feb 18, 2012 18:42 EST

In a delicate operation at sea, healthy staghorn coral were transplanted Friday to a threatened reef off the Broward County coast by researchers at Nova Southeastern University's Oceanographic Center and its internal National Coral Reef Institute (NCRI). "This is the northernmost...
 
Scientists: Mother Of Pearl Tells A Tale Of Ocean Temperature, Depth
Madison, Wisconsin - Feb 16, 2012 18:48 EST

Nacre -- or mother of pearl, scientists and artisans know, is one of nature's amazing utilitarian materials. Produced by a multitude of mollusk species, nacre is widely used in jewelry and art. It is inlaid into musical instruments, furniture and...
 
Marine Scientists Awarded Grant To Study Ciguatera Fish Poisoning; 'There's A Lot We Don't Know'
Austin, Texas - Feb 15, 2012 20:44 EST

Marine scientist Deana Erdner is part of an international team of researchers awarded an anticipated five-year, $4 million grant to study the causes of ciguatera fish poisoning, the most common form of algal toxin-induced seafood poisoning in the world. The study...
 
Researchers: Ocean Microbe Communities Changing, But Long-Term Environmental Impact Is Unclear
Corvallis, Oregon - Feb 14, 2012 17:58 EST

As oceans warm due to climate change, water layers will mix less and affect the microbes and plankton that pump carbon out of the atmosphere but researchers say it's still unclear whether these processes will further increase global warming...
 
Florida Keys 'Wreck Trek' Program's Prize Winners Announced
Key West, Florida - Feb 14, 2012 00:25 EST

Several thousand divers visit the Florida Keys annually to dive the island chain's shipwreck trail. More than 100 of them completed a series of nine wreck dives to be eligible to win one of several dive and lodging packages and...
 
Scientists: Big Fish Shelter Choice Could Have Impact On Ability To Survive Climate Change
Townsville, Queensland - Feb 13, 2012 23:45 EST

When it comes to choosing a place to hang out, big reef fish like coral trout, snappers and sweetlips have strong architectural preferences. The choices big fish make on where to shelter could have a major influence on their ability to...
 
'Anti-Freeze' Fish Of Antarctica Threatened By Climate Change; 'So Well Adapted To Water At Freezing Temperatures'
New Haven, Connecticut - Feb 13, 2012 23:16 EST

A Yale-led study of the evolutionary history of Antarctic fish and their "anti-freeze" proteins illustrates how tens of millions of years ago a lineage of fish adapted to newly formed polar conditions and how today they are endangered by...
 


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