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Group: National Geographic's New TV Show 'Wicked Tuna' Trivializes Plight Of Disappearing Bluefin Tuna
San Francisco, California - Mar 30, 2012 18:41 EST

A new National Geographic Channel show, Wicked Tuna, focuses on a group of fishermen trying to catch one of ocean's most majestic and imperiled fish, the bluefin tuna. The program comes at a time when key fisheries for bluefin tuna...
 
Superstopper: Containing A Tunnel Flood With An Inflatable Plug; 'No One's Ever Done This Before'
Washington, D.C. - Mar 29, 2012 20:35 EST

Twenty years ago in Chicago, a small leak in an unused freight tunnel expanded beneath the Windy City and started a flood which eventually gushed through the entire tunnel system. A quarter-million people were evacuated from the buildings above, nearly...
 
WHOI Team Uses Advanced Imaging Data To Bring A New View Of Titanic To The World
Wood Hole, Massachusetts - Mar 29, 2012 19:42 EST

Newly released images of the Titanic wreck site provide the first unrestricted view of the world's most notable maritime heritage site. These new images add to the already unprecedented collection of images published in the April 2012 issue of National...
 
Guy Harvey Gambles On Florida Reef Conservation With New Lottery Scratch-off Tickets
Fort Launderdale, Florida - Mar 29, 2012 10:15 EST

For fans of marine wildlife artist and conservationist Guy Harvey there's a new collector's artwork series that will be available starting on April 3rd—priced at just $2. Dr. Harvey and the Florida Lottery are officially launching the GUY HARVEY® Scratch-Off game...
 
Size Matters: Large Marine Protected Areas Work For Dolphins
North Dunedin, New Zealand - Mar 27, 2012 18:50 EST

Ecologists in New Zealand have shown for the first time that Marine Protected Areas – long advocated as a way of protecting threatened marine mammals – actually work. Their study, based on 21 years' monitoring and published today in the...
 
Hammerhead Double Whammy: 'Look-Alike' Species May Muddy The Water For The Endangered Shark
Fort Launderdale, Florida - Mar 26, 2012 20:17 EST

Identity confusion between a new, yet unnamed shark species, originally discovered off the eastern United States by Nova Southeastern University Oceanographic Center (NSU-OC) researchers, and its look-alike cousin—the endangered scalloped hammerhead shark—may threaten the survival of both species. According to an...
 
Excrete Science: Radioactive Medicine Being Tracked Through Rivers
Newark, Deleware - Mar 26, 2012 20:09 EST

A University of Delaware oceanographer has stumbled upon an unusual aid for studying local waterways: radioactive iodine. Trace amounts of the contaminant, which is used in medical treatments, are entering waterways via wastewater treatment systems and providing a new way...
 
Seismic Survey At The Mariana Trench Will Follow Water Dragged Down Into The Earth's Mantle
St. Louis, Missouri - Mar 23, 2012 18:58 EST

Last month, Doug Wiens, PhD, professor of earth and planetary science at Washington University in St. Louis, and two WUSTL students were cruising the tropical waters of the western Pacific above the Mariana trench aboard the research vessel Thomas G....
 
Study: Ancient Civilizations Reveal Ways To Manage Fisheries For Sustainability; 'Management Matters'
Palo Alto, California - Mar 23, 2012 18:20 EST

In the search for sustainability of the ocean's fisheries, solutions can be found in a surprising place: the ancient past. In a study published on March 23 in the journal Fish and Fisheries, a team of marine scientists reconstructed fisheries...
 
Research: Waters Rising, But Venice Also Continues To Slowly Sink; 'It's A Small Effect'
San Diego, California - Mar 22, 2012 18:49 EST

The water flowing through Venice's famous canals laps at buildings a little higher every year – and not only because of a rising sea level. Although previous studies had found that Venice has stabilized, new measurements indicate that the historic...
 
U.S. Scientist Helps Lead International Study Of Ocean Value; Oceans 'Victim Of A Massive Market Failure'
Gloucester Point, Virginia. - Mar 22, 2012 18:45 EST

Professor Robert Diaz of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, is a co-editor of "Valuing the Ocean" a major new study by an international team of scientists and economists that attempts to measure the ocean's...
 
Researcher: Australian Saltwater Crocs Are World's Most Powerful Biters; 'Astounding' Power
Tallahassee, Florida - Mar 22, 2012 18:19 EST

In Greg Erickson's lab at Florida State University, crocodiles and alligators rule. Skeletal snouts and toothy grins adorn window ledges and tables — all donated specimens that are scrutinized by researchers and students alike. Lately, Erickson, a Florida State biology professor, and...
 
Researchers To Examine The Effects Of Year-Old NOAA West Coast 'Catch Shares' Program
Santa Barbara, California - Mar 21, 2012 18:50 EST

UC Santa Barbara resource economists Christopher Costello and Robert Deacon will be examining the ongoing effects of a fisheries management system implemented by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in January 2011. Their effort is funded as part of...
 
Scientists: Amount Of Coldest Antarctic Water Near Ocean Floor Decreasing For Decades
Silver Spring, Maryland - Mar 20, 2012 19:50 EST

Scientists have found a large reduction in the amount of the coldest deep ocean water, called Antarctic Bottom Water, all around the Southern Ocean using data collected from 1980 to 2011. These findings, in a study now online, will likely...
 
Bradley And Carr Catch Their Limits On Potomac, But Finish Mid-Pack; 'It Was Definitely A Slugfest'
Marbury, Maryland - Mar 18, 2012 17:27 EST

GEICO anglers Christiana Bradley and Teddy Carr didn't have much luck in Saturday's Toyota Tundra Bassmaster Weekend Series event on the Potomac River. Fishing in the opener of Division 21 (Maryland) of the Weekend Series, Bradley placed 57th and Carr 64th...
 
Study: Marine Protected Areas Defenseless Against Global Warming; 'Not An Effective General Solution'
Chapel Hill, North Carolina - Mar 17, 2012 19:06 EST

Special conservation zones known as marine protected areas provide many direct benefits to fisheries and coral reefs. However, such zones appear to offer limited help to corals in their battle against global warming, according to a new study. To protect coral...
 
NOAA: Use Of Lethal Force To Stop Protected Sea Lions From Eating Protected Salmon Has Been Approved
Silver Spring, Maryland - Mar 16, 2012 19:35 EST

NOAA's Fisheries Service said today it was authorizing Idaho, Oregon and Washington to permanently remove the specific California sea lions eating the imperiled salmon and steelhead that congregate below Bonneville Dam as they head up the Columbia River to spawn....
 
Giant Squids' Giant Eyes: The Better To See Hungry Whales With; 'Eyes Are Expensive To Build And Maintain'
Lund, Scania - Mar 16, 2012 19:29 EST

It's no surprise that giant and colossal squid are big, but it's their eyes that are the real standouts when it comes to size, with diameters measuring two or three times that of any other animal. Now, researchers reporting online...
 
Clash Of The Crayfish: Why The Americans Are Winning
Leeds, U.K. - Mar 15, 2012 20:29 EST

Aggressive American signal crayfish are threatening Yorkshire's native white-clawed crayfish populations because they have better resistance to parasites and are less fussy about what they eat. The native crayfish suffers from two parasites; plague, which is carried by the American...
 
Researchers Find Link Between Iron And Biological Productivity Of Ancient Pacific Ocean
Boston, Massachusetts - Mar 15, 2012 19:55 EST

A team of researchers has just published a new paper, lead authored by Boston University Professor of Earth Sciences Richard W. Murray, that provides compelling evidence from marine sediment that supports the theory that iron in the Earth's oceans has...
 
New Study Lowers Estimate Of Ancient Sea-Level Rise: 20 To 43 Feet
New York, New York - Mar 14, 2012 20:07 EST

The seas are creeping higher as the planet warms. But how high will they go? Projections for the year 2100 range from inches to several feet, or more. The sub-tropical islands of Bermuda and the Bahamas contain important sites where...
 
Suba: New 'Intelligent' BCD Aims To Automatically Stabilize Divers, Eliminate The Bends
Lausanne, Switzerland - Mar 13, 2012 10:36 EST

The Suba system aims to become to diving what the automatic pilot is to flying. Developed by a student from EPFL, it will be released to the market by his start-up company: Pandora Underwater Equipment, starting from April 2012. When a...
 
First As Researchers Find Fish Use Sounds, Smells And Visual Cues To Navigate Reefs
Bristol, U.K - Mar 12, 2012 20:16 EST

Young coral reef fish use sounds, smells and visual cues to find their nursery grounds, according to new research from the University of Bristol, published today in Ecology. Ever had to find your friend in a crowd? Imagine at...
 
Scientists Document First Consumption Of Abundant Life Form, Archaea
Corvalis, Oregon - Mar 12, 2012 18:51 EST

A team of scientists has documented for the first time that animals can and do consume Archaea – a type of single-celled microorganism thought to be among the most abundant life forms on Earth. Archaea that consume the greenhouse gas methane...
 
Research: Chumming, Ecotourism Does Not Impact Shark Behavior
Miami, Florida - Mar 9, 2012 19:31 EST

Ecotourism activities that use food to attract and concentrate wildlife for viewing have become a controversial topic in ecological studies. This debate is best exemplified by the shark dive tourism industry, a highly lucrative and booming global market. Use of...
 
Gannet Study Reveals Perils Of High-Speed Diving; Fatal Collisions Injuries Common
Palmerston North, New Zealand - Mar 9, 2012 19:14 EST

Gannets may be among the fastest and most agile seabird hunters around, but they risk dying of fatal neck and head injuries from accidental collisions in the water when diving for fish at breakneck speeds, a Massey biology researcher has...
 
'Chum Cam' Underwater Video Survey Shows That Reef Sharks Thrive In Marine Reserves
Stony Brook, New York - Mar 8, 2012 22:43 EST

A team of scientists, led by the Institute for Ocean Conservation Science at Stony Brook University, used video cameras to count Caribbean reef sharks (Carcharhinus perezi) inside and outside marine reserves on the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef in the Caribbean Sea....
 
Hydrothermal Seep: Hot Meets Cold At New Deep-Sea Ecosystem; 'We Need To Re-Think The Boundary'
La Jolla, California - Mar 8, 2012 15:22 EST

Decades ago, marine scientists made a startling discovery in the deep sea. They found environments known as hydrothermal vents, where hot water surges from the seafloor and life thrives without sunlight. Then they found equally unique, sunless habitats in cold areas...
 
Deadly Expansion Of Shark, Swordfish Fishery Planned For California Sea Turtle Protected Area
Sacramento, California - Mar 6, 2012 21:15 EST

The federal Pacific Fishery Management Council voted on Saturday to pursue the expansion of California's devastating drift gillnet fishery for swordfish and sharks into an area that is currently off-limits to that fishing to protect critically endangered Pacific leatherback sea...
 
Florida Keys Coral Expert Ken Nedimyer Named CNN Hero; 'I Had To Pinch Myself'
Florida Keys, Florida - Mar 2, 2012 19:39 EST

A Florida Keys coral restoration expert has been named a CNN Hero for his pioneering efforts to develop techniques to preserve coral reefs and motivate public support for a cause that attracts environmentally conscious vacationers. The honor for Ken Nedimyer, founder...
 
Study: Law That Regulates Shark Fishery Is Too Liberal; 'It Does Not Prevent Waste Or Overfishing'
Vancouver, British Columbia - Mar 2, 2012 19:30 EST

Shark fins are worth more than other parts of the shark and are often removed from the body, which gets thrown back into the sea. To curtail this wasteful practice, many countries allow the fins to be landed detached from...
 
What Makes A Robot Fish Attractive? Hint: It's In The Moves
New York, New York - Mar 1, 2012 19:45 EST

Probing the largely unexplored question of what characteristics make a leader among schooling fish, researchers have discovered that by mimicking nature, a robotic fish can transform into a leader of live ones. Through a series of experiments, researchers from Polytechnic Institute...
 
Scientists: Diverse Catches Are Better For Fishery Ecosystems; 'Balanced Harvest'
Clayton, Victoria - Mar 1, 2012 19:26 EST

Fishing for a 'balanced harvest' can achieve productive fisheries as well as environmental conservation, an international scientific team reports today in the journal Science. In contrast, increasing fishing selectivity to catch a small group of species and sizes neither maximizes production...
 
Study: Ocean Acidification Rate May Be Unprecedented; Few Parallels In 300-Million-Yr Geologic Record
Palisades, New York - Mar 1, 2012 19:15 EST

More catastrophic events have shaken earth before, but perhaps not as quickly. The study finds two other times of potential ocean acidification: the extinctions triggered by massive volcanism at the end of the Permian and Triassic eras, about 252 million...
 
Study: Dust Linked To Increased Glacier Melting, Ocean Productivity; 'Absorbs Solar Radiation'
Miami, Florida - Mar 1, 2012 19:06 EST

A University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science-led study shows a link between large dust storms on Iceland and glacial melting. The dust is both accelerating glacial melting and contributing important nutrients to the surrounding North...
 
Unlocking The Secrets Of Sea Turtle Migration; 'Bermuda Is A Place Where Young Turtles Go To Grow Up'
St. Petersburg, Florida - Feb 29, 2012 18:45 EST

Sea turtles have long and complex lives; they can live into their 70s or 80s and they famously return to their birthplace to nest. But new research suggests this isn't the only big migration in a sea turtle's life. "We're starting...
 
Say Again: Blue Whale Behavior Affected By Man-Made Noise
San Diego, California - Feb 29, 2012 18:24 EST

Blue whale vocal behavior is affected by man-made noise, even when that noise does not overlap the frequencies the whales use for communication, according to new research published Feb. 29 in the open access journal PLoS ONE. The whales were...
 
Phosphorus And Groundwater: Scientists Establish Links Between Agricultural Use And Transport To Streams
Sacramento, California - Feb 29, 2012 17:49 EST

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey have, for the first time, demonstrated how aquifer composition can affect how excessive levels of phosphorous (an essential nutrient contained in fertilizers) can be carried from fertilized agricultural fields via groundwater to streams and...
 
Scientists: Plants, Nuts And Coastal Microalgae Support Bottom Fish In Hawaiian Submarine Canyons
Manoa, Hawaii - Feb 28, 2012 18:40 EST

Scientists from the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) at the University of Hawaii – Manoa (UHM) and colleagues recently discovered that land-based plant material and coastal macroalgae indirectly support the increased abundances of bottom fish in...
 
Researchers: Sharks Blamed As Number Of Dead Sea Otters Recovered Hits High; 'Taste-Tests' Take Toll
Santa Cruz, California - Feb 24, 2012 19:24 EST

The California or southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) appears to be experiencing an unprecedented increase in mortality from attacks by sharks, according to federal and state scientists. Since 1968, biologists and veterinarians at the U.S. Geological Survey and California...
 


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